LESSON PLANS APRIL 17-21,2017

Monday April 17th, 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials                                        PE

8:50-9:50                                                 Math

MATH

MATH/ Adding and Subtracting Meters and Centimeters in Compound Units

Objectives: Add and subtract meters and centimeters in compound units.

Teaching strategies: Write in the board ‘2 m 60 cm + 25 cm= Ask students how they get the answer. Tell students that since there are no meters in front of 25 cm, they can just add the centimeters. The sum of 60 cm and 25 cm is 85 cm. Write on the board ‘2 m 60 cm +25 – 2 m 85 cm’
Assess: Have students do tasks 14-15, TB p.12

Practice: Exercise 1,p. 113-114

Extra Practice: 1, p. 113-114

Tests: 1A and 1B,p. 1-6
6.2 Introduction to Kilometers

Objectives: Understand the kilometer as a unit of measurement. Convert a measurement in kilometers and meters and vice versa

Materials: Map of buildings around school, Map of cities closest to school

Teaching Strategies: Have students look at TB p.13. Bring to their attention that a bus is about 10 m long. Tell students to imagine 10 meter sticks lying end to end. Say that the total length of the stick is 10 m. Tell students that to get 1 kilometer, imagine 100 such buses parked front to end. Or, they can imagine 1000 meter sticks placed end to end. A kilometer is little more than half a mile. Write “ on the board” 1 km=1000 m

Use a familiar landmark near the school that is about 1 km away. Draw a roughly scaled map on the board showing the school the landmark and indicate the distance of 1 km . Using the map or list, ask students how far it is to ___ from_______ in meters. Tell students that sometimes they may get mixed up between centimeters and kilometers. Here’s a way to help them remember. The prefix centi means ‘a hundred. For an example, a centipede has 100 legs. There are 100 cents in a dollar. 100 centimeters= 1  meter. The prefix ‘kilo-’ means thousand. 1 kilometer= 1000 meters.

Assess:  Have students do tasks 1-6, TB p. 14-15

Practice: WB Exercise 4,p. 11-14
Word Problems / Practice B

Objectives : Solve word problems involving the subtraction of money.

Practice adding and subtracting money.

Practice word problems involving addition and subtraction of money

Teaching Strategies: Have student work on tasks 10 and 11 on their own before discussing their answer. You can also call upon a student to present the solution.

Call some students to explain how they solved the problems and if their answers are reasonable. Provide any reteaching  of concepts that may be necessary.

Practice: Workbook Exercise 5, p.77-80, Exercise 3, p. 159-162

9:50- 10:30                                      CKLA EXTENSIONS

Thirteen Colonies and Colonial America Review

As you conduct this review of what students have learned about the

thirteen colonies and their regions, have students reference and add to

the graphic organizers for each colony in their Colonial America notebook

or folder as applicable. Have them also review and/or add to the Colonial

America Acrostics you started in Lesson 1, using words, phrases, and/or

sentences from their worksheets. You may wish to do this as a class, or

have students work in groups or with a partner.

For any categories that are still not complete on the graphic organizers,

you may wish to assign certain students or groups a question to research

and share with the class. This may also be done during the Pausing

Point.

Using Poster 1 (Regional Map of Colonial America), point to each region,

and have students identify some of the unique characteristics of the

Southern, New England, and Middle Atlantic colonies. For each region,

have students describe the geography, climate, and culture of that region

(e.g., the ways colonists supported themselves, the crops colonists

grew, reasons why colonists settled in the specific region, etc.). Possible

discussion points are listed below.

• The Southern colonies had a warm climate and were primarily

agricultural. Southern colonies had many small farms and large

plantations. Their main crops were tobacco, rice, and indigo. These

were called cash crops. The Southern colonies were reliant on

slavery to support their labor needs. Colonists moved to Maryland for

religious reasons, but most others settled in the Southern colonies for

economic reasons. Important cities in the South included Jamestown,

Savannah, and Charleston (Charles Town).

• The New England colonies were colder and had a shorter growing

season than the Southern colonies. Also, the soil was rockier and

therefore not as good for farming. Because the New England colonies

had a lot of trees, they exported timber to England, the West Indies, and to other colonial regions. Shipbuilding and fishing were big

industries, as was fur trading. The colonists who first settled in the

New England colonies did so primarily for religious reasons. Pilgrims

and Puritans were the first settlers of the New England colonies. The

colonists in New England did not depend heavily on slavery, although

there were enslaved Africans working in some towns. Important cities

in New England included Boston and Plymouth.

• The Middle colonies had a somewhat mild climate and were

primarily agricultural. Their main crop was wheat. They became “the

breadbasket” of the colonies because of the large amount of flour

they were able to produce in mills and export to England and the

West Indies. Because of high immigration to the Middle colonies,

Quaker opposition, and smaller farms, slavery did not develop there

to the same extent as it did in the Southern colonies. Colonists

moved to the Middle colonies for both religious and economic

reasons. The Dutch were the first settlers of New York, once called

New Amsterdam, but this area was eventually taken over by the

English. Quakers were the first large group of settlers in Pennsylvania.

Important cities in the Middle colonies included Philadelphia and New

York City.

Colonial Pen Pals

Divide the class into three groups. Assign one colonial region to each

group: Southern, New England, and Middle Atlantic. Within each region,

allow students to choose a colony. Next, have students from different

regions/colonies pair up and exchange pen pal letters as if they were

living in those colonies. In their letters, have students describe their

everyday life in the colony, including their name and age, where they live,

whether or not they have a trade, if he or she goes to school, etc. Have

students ask each other questions about his or her colony. You may wish

to have students reference the index cards they discussed in the Think

Pair Share. As time allows, have students write responses to each other.

This may also be done during the Pausing Point.

Note: The additional thirty minutes for Domain Writing begins in this

lesson. In addition to the writing activities in the Extensions, there

are also several writing opportunities in the Pausing Points. Time

may also be devoted to researching more information about certain

colonies. Refer to the schedule in the Introduction to help guide the

remaining five days of this domain.

10:30-11:00                                  COMPASS LEARNING
11:00-11:45                                   CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 LESSON 11
Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned? Timeline of the Americas;

Instructional Master 11A-1;

red, white, and blue colored pencils

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud The Road to Revolution, Part I U.S. map 20

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Image Card 20

Word Work: Uninhabited drawing paper, drawing tools

What Have We Already Learned? (Instructional Master 11A-1)

Give each student a copy of Instructional Master 11A-1. Tell students that

they are going to use the Timeline of the Americas and what they have

learned to list the thirteen colonies in order of settlement on the stripes of

the colonial flag. Have students write the dates of establishment beside

Jamestown (Virginia) and Plymouth (Massachusetts) colonies. If you

have written dates for all colonies on the timeline, you may wish to have

students transcribe dates for all.

As time allows, you may also wish to have students color the colonial

flag with white stars on a blue background, with alternating red and white

stripes (beginning with red at the top). This may also be done during the

Pausing Point..

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully to hear about many conflicts that arose

among the British, French, Spanish, and Native Americans after the

establishment of the thirteen colonies. Tell them to listen to find out more

about the trail of events that led the colonists to feel less and less like

Europeans and to eventually fight for their freedom from Britain. Comprehension Questions 15 minutes

1. Why were conflicts increasing among the Spanish,

French, and English? (They each had settlements in the Americas and

were land hungry; they clashed over the areas of North America they

wanted for themselves; however, these areas were not uninhabited.)

How were the Native Americans involved? (They were distressed;

many of them had moved westward to escape the influx of colonists,

and now the English were beginning to enter that area as well.)

2. What war broke out in 1675 between the Native

Americans and the English in New England? (King Philip’s War, led

by Chief Metacom of the Wampanoag, son of Chief Massasoit) What

was the result? (The English won, and destroyed even more of the

Wampanoag homes.)

Show image 11A-3: French and Indian War battle scene

3. Inferential Describe what you see in this image. What was the name

of this war between the French and English, which involved Native

Americans fighting on both sides? (French and Indian War) Where was

this war fought? (in the forests of North America) Where was another

war occurring between France and England? (in other parts of the

world where the French and the British competed for land, such as

Europe, the West Indies, and India) How did the French and Indian

War end? (The British captured Quebec, the French capital, and won

the war. The French and English signed a peace treaty.) Did the Native

Americans sign a peace treaty? (no)

4. Literal Did the French and Indian War occur before or after the

thirteen colonies were established? (after) [Have a volunteer place

Image Card 20 (French and Indian War) on the timeline after the

colony of Georgia. You may wish to write “1754” beneath the card.]

5. Inferential Because the Native Americans did not sign a peace treaty,

which conflict occurred next between the British and Chief Pontiac

of the Ottawa tribe, who led about thirteen united groups against

the British? (Pontiac’s Rebellion) What was the result? (The British

realized it would be impossible to defend this land, or the settlers on

it. King George III issued a proclamation stating that settlers could not

live on land west of the Appalachian Mountains.)

6. How did all of these battles affect colonial life? (To recover from the cost of these battles, the Parliament of Britain decided that taxing the colonists was a good way to help pay for the

wars.) Do you think this was a just or unjust decision? Why? (Answers

may vary.)

7.  What were the three acts passed by Parliament that

taxed the colonists? (Sugar Act, Stamp Act, and Quartering Act)

Compare and contrast these three taxes. In other words, how were

they similar, and how were they different? (Similarities—They were

all imposed by Britain on the colonists without representation; they

all cost the colonists money; they were created to help pay for the

war debt; etc. Differences—the Sugar and Stamp Acts were taxes on

products the colonists used every day, but the Sugar Act was on food

and other household goods, whereas the Stamp Act was on printed

reading materials, such as newspapers and cards. The Quartering

Act was very different as it required colonists to provide supplies and

lodging to British soldiers.) How did the outspoken colonists react

to all of these taxes? What was the saying used to describe how

they felt? (They felt distressed and that it was unjust; they said, “No

taxation without representation!” They steeled themselves for a fight

against Britain.)

I am going to ask a question. I will give you a minute to think about the

question, and then I will ask you to turn to your neighbor and discuss the

question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you discussed

with your partner.

8. Think Pair Share: Why do you think the colonists began

to feel less and less like Europeans?

11:45-12:15                               RECESS
12:15-1:00                                      LUNCH

1:00-2:00                         CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9 LESSON 10
Spelling Spelling Assessment Worksheet 10.1; optional pens 25

Reading Time Whole Group Silent: “A History

of People in North America”

The Age of Exploration;

Vocabulary Cards;

Worksheet 10.2

Grammar Practice Comparative and

Superlative Adjectives Using

Suffixes –er and –est

Worksheet 10.3

Spelling Practice Dictionary Skills

dictionaries; copies of Word

Meanings page, if needed;

Worksheet 10.4

Advance Preparation

Make sure to erase the spelling table from the board and/or turn the table

over so that students cannot refer to it during the assessment.

Display the following comparative and superlative adjectives poster:

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparative adjectives compare two nouns to show that one is

greater or more. The suffix –er is added to adjectives.

Superlative adjectives compare more than two nouns to show that

one is greatest or most. The suffix –est is added to adjectives.

Write the following sentence on the board or chart paper for use during

the second Spelling lesson and keep it covered until the lesson:

Who would be more gregarious, a clown or a loner?

If there are not enough print or online dictionaries, photocopy the Word

Meanings on the next page for use with Worksheet 10.4.

Word Meanings

gregarious—adjective: sociable; liking companionship (gregariously, gregariousness)

flapjack—noun: pancake (flapjacks)

subside—verb: to sink to a lower level (subsided, subsiding, subsides)

offhand—adjective: without previous thought or preparation (offhanded)

marquee—noun: a roof-like structure over a theater that usually posts the name of the

movie currently playing

Spelling Assessment

Worksheet 10.1

• Have students turn to Worksheet 10.1 for the spelling assessment.

• If you would like for students to have pens, this is the time to pass

them out.

• Tell students that for this assessment, they will write the words under

the header to which they belong. For example, if you call out the word

news they would write that word under the header ‘ew’ > /ue/.

Whole Group Silent: “A History of People in North America”

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that the title of today’s chapter is “A History of People in

North America”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter

Practice Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Using Suffixes –er and –est

Worksheet 10.3

• Direct students’ attention to the comparative and superlative

adjectives poster you prepared and displayed earlier.

Practice Dictionary Skills

Worksheet 10.4

Note to Teacher

Pair up students to discuss word meanings and share a print or online

dictionary

• Remind students of the dictionary activity in Lesson 5 and tell them

that today, they will follow the same procedure.

• Tell students that you will ask them a question.

• Say, “Sometimes you are asked a question and you don’t understand

the meaning of all the words, so it is hard to answer.”

Wrap-Up

• Ask students to turn to Worksheet 10.2 and complete it as a teacherguided

activity.
2:00-2:50                                      MATH/READING-Small group
Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions

(READING A TO Z BOOK )

2.50 -3:00 Dismissal                         Classroom Clean up
Tuesday,April 18th, 2017

8:00-8:45                                           ART
8:50- 9.50                                              MATH
Math/Estimating and Measuring Lengths in Meters and Centimeters

Objectives: Review meters and centimeters as units of length. Find there number of centimeters in a meter. Convert a measurement in meters and centimeters to centimeters and vice versa.

Materials: Meter Sticks, Measuring Tape, Ruler and WB/TB

Divide the students into groups of 2-4. Provide each group with a meter stick and blank record sheets. Tell students that they are going to find out the lengths of several items in the classroom. Have students estimate the length of the board. Tell them to write “Height of board” in the first column of the paper and their estimate in the column next to it. Tell students to estimate the height of the door, the length and height of a cupboard, the length and height of a student’s desk, and the  length of the teacher’s table. Use the meter sticks to find out the length of these items. Write their measurements to the nearest meter in the next column under the heading ‘Measurement”. Instead of using meter sticks, you can also use the string or cardboard strips of a meter length. Write on the board, height of the door, length of the cupboard, height of the cupboard , length of my desk, height of my desk and length and height of the teachers table. Give students ample time to measure the items. Ask students if they found it difficult to measure height and length. Tell students that the meter stick will not show the exact length or height of the items as the stick goes by the meter. They can use the word ‘abit’ to describe the length of the items rounding to the nearest meter.

Assess: Have students work in pairs to do task 5, TB p.9 WB Exercise 1,p. 7

6.1 b Subtracting Meters and Centimeters

Have students do tasks 1113, TB p.11

Challenge: Have students work in pairs and write down as many bonds of 100 as they can, one at a time. Time limit is 5 minutes. The student pair with the greatest number of number bond wins.

Practice:  WB Exercise 2, p.8

9.50-10.30                             CKLA EXTENIONS

A Ship by Any Other Name

Show image 7A-2: Ship laden with supplies

Ask students to describe what they see in the image. Ask them what role

ships played in the establishment of the English colonies. Guide students

to discuss the importance of ships in allowing people to journey across

the Atlantic Ocean to the New World—not only the English colonists,

but also the European explorers they have heard about. Discuss others

whose lives were influenced by ships, such as the pirate buccaneers,

trade merchants, English navy, fishermen, and shipbuilders. Remind

students that shipbuilding was a crucial part of the economy of the New

England colonies.

Ask students to list some of the names of the ships they have heard

about in the read-alouds. Review the people, events, and significant

dates surrounding the ships. (Captain Newport and his men sailed to

Jamestown in 1606 on the Discovery, Susan Constant, and Godspeed,

and arrived about five months later in 1607. Later, the Patience and

Deliverance were sent to Jamestown colony laden with supplies, but by

the time they arrived—and they barely made it—the ships were almost

out of supplies. The Pilgrims and others sailed to Plymouth in 1620 on

the Mayflower. William Penn sailed to Pennsylvania on the Welcome.)

Ask students to think about what type of ship they would like to design

and/or command as a captain. Have them write a paragraph about their

ship, including its name and the reason for its name, its purpose and/or

destination, what it looks like, and what types of people would travel on

it. Have students illustrate their ship. Allow a few students to share their

writing and drawings with the class.

You may also wish to show others images of ships from the domain, such

as image 6A-4 of the Mayflower in a turbulent storm, and have students

respond to the image in a writing prompt to describe the setting and

event depicted. As students work, model and encourage students to use

domain-related vocabulary. American Revolution Acrostic

In two columns, write the letters of the words American Revolution

vertically on chart paper, a chalkboard, or a whiteboard. As a class, use

the letters of both words to create words, phrases, and/or sentences

about key events and people involved in this time. Encourage use of core

vocabulary and geography terms. Some examples follow (with examples

to add later in Lesson 12). You may also wish to complete/update this

activity in the Pausing Point.

• A—Acts were imposed on colonists by British; (Attucks)

• M—Metacom, Massasoit’s son, led King Philip’s war; (massacre;

Minutemen)

• E—England had become known as Great Britain, or the United

Kingdom; (“endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights”)

• R—rivals fought in the French and Indian War; (Revere’s ride)

• I—influx of settlers to North America; (issues to resolve;

independence)

• C—Colonists felt less and less like Europeans; (Continental Congress;

Concord)

• A—Appalachian Mountains; (Adams)

• N—Native American groups fought for both French and English

• R—rebellion led by Pontiac; (repealed Sugar Act)

• E—English had become known as British

• V—Virginia House of Burgesses; (very well-known speech)

• O—Ohio River Valley

• L—land disputes (Lexington)

• U—United groups of Native Americans attacked colonists; (unjust

acts; United States)

• T—taxes; (tea thrown into sea; “the shot heard round the world”)

• I—interests of colonists not represented in Parliament (Intolerable

Acts)

• O—outspoken colonists; (“One, if by land, and two, if by sea”)

• N—“No taxation without representation!” (new nation forming)

Have students create their own acrostics. You may also wish to

assign groups to create acrostics based on the many names given to

this war: American War for Independence; American Revolution; and

American Revolutionary War, or Revolutionary War.
10:30- 11:00                             COMPASS LEARNING
11:00- 11:45                                     CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 LESSON 12
Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned? Timeline of the Americas

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud The Road to Revolution, Part II U.S. map 20

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions U.S. flag 15

Word Work: Independence chart paper,

What Have We Already Learned?

Review with students what was learned in the previous lesson. You

may wish to show images from the read-aloud and/or ask the following

questions:

• What were the three conflicts called between the Native Americans

and colonists over land? (King Philip’s War, Pontiac’s Rebellion, and

French & Indian War)

• Who won these conflicts? (The English won the first war against the

Wampanoag; the Native Americans managed to keep the colonists

away from their land for a time after the thirteen united groups fought

them in the second war.)

• [Point to the Timeline of the Americas.] Did the French and Indian War

occur before or after the thirteen colonies were established? (after)

• Who fought in the French and Indian War? (the English, French, and

Native American groups on both sides)

• What were the three acts passed by Parliament that taxed the

colonists? (Sugar Act, Stamp Act, and Quartering Act)

• Why were these acts passed? (Britain was trying to find ways to raise

money to help pay their war debts.)

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully to hear more about the trail of events that

led the colonists to feel less and less like Europeans and to fight for their

freedom from Britain.

Comprehension Questions

1. Which outspoken Patriot did you hear about who

was a lawyer from Virginia? (Patrick Henry) What did he do, and

what famous quote is he known for today? (He spoke out against

what many colonists felt were Britain’s unjust and intolerable acts

by standing behind the saying “no taxation without representation!”

Henry is known for the saying “give me liberty, or give me death!”)

You heard about another Patriot, Samuel Adams. What was the name

of the group of Patriots he organized? (the Sons of Liberty)

2. Why did the colonists boycott products from Britain,

such as tea, wool, paper, and silk? (Because Britain was taxing the

colonists on these items, the colonists refused to buy them.) How did

the colonists replace these items? (They started producing their own

products, such as “liberty tea.”)

Show image 12A-3: Boston Massacre; Crispus Attucks

3. Describe what is happening in this image. (In the

Boston Massacre, a fight broke out between the colonists and British

soldiers. The soldiers fired their guns into the crowd and killed five

colonists. The colonists were horrified, and tensions grew between

them and Britain. Crispus Attucks was the first one killed and became

a hero to the colonists for standing up for what he believed in.)

Show image 12A-4: Boston Tea Party

4. Describe what is happening in this image. (The Sons of

Liberty dressed up in part like Native Americans and dumped British

tea into the Boston harbor, an event known today as the Boston Tea

Party.) Why did they do this? (These Patriots were not only boycotting

the tea, they were also sending a message with their act of destroying

the tea that they would not tolerate the injustice of the British taxes.)
11:45-12:15                                      RECESS
12:15-1:00                                       LUNCH
1:00- 2:00                                  CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9 LESSON 11

Reading Time Whole Group Silent: “Caribbean

Words”

The Age of Exploration;

Vocabulary Cards;

Worksheet 11.1

Spelling Introduce Spelling Words Worksheet 11.2 25

Take-Home Material

Family Letter; “A History of

People in North America;”

“Caribbean Words”

Worksheets 11.2–11.4

 

Whole Group Silent: “Caribbean Words”

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that the title of today’s chapter is “Caribbean Words.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter.

Previewing the Vocabulary

• Following your established procedures, preview the vocabulary as

well as assist students who need help with decoding. Since students

will be reading silently, make sure to display the image for the chapter

and preview the vocabulary words before they begin reading.

Vocabulary for “Caribbean Words”

1. steer—to control the direction of (106)

2. cheap—does not cost much (112)

3. popular—liked by many people (112)

 

Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

• ‘f’ is the most common spelling for the /f/ sound. It is used in the initial

position (fun, fig), in the final position (leaf, deaf), in the initial consonant

clusters fl– and fr– (flop, fresh), in the final consonant clusters –ft, –fth,

and –lf (lift, fifth, elf), and with separated digraphs (safe, life).

• Only ‘f’ and ‘ph’ are used at the beginning of words and syllables.

• ‘f’, ‘ff’, and ‘ph’ are used at the end of words and syllables.

• ‘ff’ is commonly found after “short” vowels written with single-letter

spellings; thus we write stiff but deaf.

• ‘ph’ is used mainly to spell words borrowed from Greek. It is used in

the consonant cluster –mph (lymph

Introduce Spelling Words

Worksheet 11.2

• Tell students that this week, they will review words with the sound of

/f/ spelled ‘f’, ‘ff’, ‘ph’, and ‘gh’.

• As you introduce each spelling word, write it on the board,

pronouncing each word as you write it.

1. phony

2. identify

3. spherical

4. laughing

5. stuffing

6. affect

7. fairest

8. phrase

9. tougher

10. fare

11. enough

12. elephant

13. trophy

14. giraffe

15. funnel

16. phases

17. roughly

18. Challenge Word: probably

19. Challenge Word: weather

20. Challenge Word: whether

2:00-2:50                                      MATH/READING- Small group

 

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions  (READING A TO Z BOOK )Remind students that they have learned two parts of speech—nouns and

verbs—and review them. (A noun names a person, place, or thing. A verb can

show action.)

3:00 Dismissal                      Classroom Clean up

Wednesday April  19th, 2017

8:00- 9.50                                       Math REVIEW
MATH /Geometry

Ch 1: Angles

Objectives: Identify angles in the environment, relate size of angle to the degree of turning, relate the number of angles to the number of sides in a polygon.

Materials: Stiff cards, folding meter, geo strips

Resources: TB: p. 127-129

WB: p. 146-147

Tests: p. 227-234

Math/Geometry /Angles

Objectives: Identify angles in the environment/ relate size of angle to the degree of turning, relate the number of angles to the number of sides in a polygon.

Materials: Stiff Cards/folding meter sticks/ geostrips

Teaching Strategies: Hand each student a stiff card or two geostrips attached at one end or a folding stick meter . Tell students to make an angle with their cards, folding meter stick, geo strips. Open the folding meter stick a little and trace the angle on the board. Tell students that an angle is formed when two straight lines meet at a point. Have students do problem in TB p. 127 Have students  look around the class to find angles to measure. Give students ample time to do so. Ask students to  name some other objects outside the classroom that contains angles. Have students refer to task 1 TB p. 128, for some examples of angles of objects outside the class.  Ask students what have they noticed about the angles as they pull one side of the folding meter stick or geo strip apart. Tell students that the larger the angle, the more one side has to be turned away from the other side. Have students to work in pairs to locate angles in the class. Hand each pair a sheet Appendix 12.1A Draw or display on the board afterwards 1 rectangle, i triangle, 1 octagon, 1 hexagon, and 1 pentagon. Sk students to name these shapes. Ask students supply the answer, write it down below each shape. Tell students to draw 3 polygons on their own. Remind them that the figures must be closed and the lines must be straight and they meet to form angles. Give students ample time to draw and have them share their shapes with the class.

Assess: Have students do tasks 2-6, TB p. 128-129

Practice: WB Exercise 1,.p. 211-212

Ch2: Right Angles

Objectives: Identify right angles, classify angles as less than, equal to, greater than.

Materials: Rough paper, index cards, geostrips, clock

Resources: TB: p. 131

WB: p. 148-150

EP: p. 213-214

Tests: p. 235-242

Ch3: Quadrilaterals

Objectives: Recognize parallel lines and intersecting lines. Recognize and identify squares, rectangles, parallelogram, rhombus, equilateral, isosceles, and scalene triangles.

Resources: TB: p. 132-134

WB: p. 151-152
Instant activity: Geometry Problem on the board 10mins

Session: Review Problems 15mins

Independent work: 15mins

Review & Check: 10mins

Small Group: 30mins

Competition: Around the World end of class

Exit Ticket:5mins

 
9:50- 10:30                              CKLA EXTENIONS
Sayings and Phrases: Actions Speak Louder Than Words 5 minutes

Proverbs are short, traditional sayings that have been passed along orally

from generation to generation. These sayings usually express general

truths based on experiences and observations of everyday life. Whereas

some proverbs do have literal meanings—that is, they mean exactly what

they say—many proverbs have a richer meaning beyond the literal level. It

is important to help your students understand the difference between the

literal meanings of the words and their implied or figurative meanings.

Ask students if they have ever heard anyone say “actions speak louder

than words.” (If students have heard the Grade 3 Light and Sound

domain, you may wish to review the use of the saying in that story.)

Reread the following excerpts from the read-aloud:

In 1773, three British trade ships loaded with tea appeared in the

Boston Harbor. The Sons of Liberty took action. Wearing elements of

Native American war clothing, they threw all of the tea into the water!

The very first shots of the American Revolution [or the shot heard

round the world] were fired in Lexington on April 19, 1775, as the

British soldiers were on their way to Concord.

Ask students what actions performed in these excerpts “spoke” or

delivered a message. (First action—The colonists threw the tea into the

water to send the message to England that they would not tolerate unjust

taxes. This action was more effective in getting the king’s attention than

their words of protest had been. Second action—The “shot heard round

the world” was the first shot fired that started the American Revolution. It

sent the message to the world that there would be war between England

and America, and it has had far-reaching impacts around the world and

throughout history.

Ask students if they ever faced a situation in which someone’s actions

made an impression on them more powerfully than any words that could

have been said. You may wish to discuss the effects of certain actions in a classroom that “speak” loudly. Give students an opportunity to share

their experiences, and encourage them to use the saying. Try to find

other opportunities to use this saying in the classroom.

Timeline of the Americas

Ask students the following, and have them place the correct cards on the

timeline:

• Did the Boston Massacre and Boston Tea Party occur before or after

the French and Indian War?” (after) [Have a volunteer place Image

Cards 21 (Boston Massacre) and 22 (Boston Tea Party) on the timeline

after the French and Indian War. You may wish to write “1770” and

“1773” beneath the cards, respectively.]

• Did the Continental Congress meet before or after the Boston

Massacre and Boston Tea Party?” (after) [Have a volunteer place

Image Card 23 (Continental Congress) on the timeline after the Boston

Tea Party. You may wish to write “1774” beneath the card. Remind

students that this was the first meeting of the Continental Congress,

and that they met again the following year.]

• Did Paul Revere ride to warn the colonists that the English were

coming to seize their weapons before or after the first meeting of the

Continental Congress?” (after) [Have a volunteer place Image Card 24

(Paul Revere’s Ride) on the timeline after the Continental Congress.

You may wish to write “1775” beneath the card.]

• Did the Founding Fathers of the Second Continental Congress draft,

approve, and later sign the Declaration of Independence before or

after Paul Revere’s ride?” (after) [Have a volunteer place the final card,

Image Card 25 (Declaration of Independence), on the timeline after

Paul Revere’s ride. Write “July 4, 1776” beneath the card, and tell

students that this is the final date they will need to memorize.]

Tell students that you have now finished creating the timeline. Point back

to the following four cards, and remind students that they will need to

remember these four dates:

• The first English colony was established in Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607.

• The first-known African laborers were brought to the colonies in 1619.

• The Pilgrims landed in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1620.

• The Declaration of Independence was approved on July 4, 1776.

Colonial America 12B | The Road to Revolution, Part II 213

Revolutionary Sayings; American Revolution Acrostic

Review with students the four sayings they have heard relative to the

Revolutionary War, or American Revolution:

• “No taxation without representation!”

• “One, if by land, and two, if by sea”

• “the shot heard round the world”

• “Give me liberty, or give me death!”

Have students choose one saying and write a paragraph about its

meaning, including a description of the person who said it and the

surrounding events.

You may also update and/or have students reference the American

Revolution acrostic started in Lesson 11. Have a few students share

their paragraphs and/or acrostics with the class as time allows. These

activities may also be done during the Pausing Point
10:30-11:00                           COMPASS LEARNING
11:00-11:45                               CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 PAUSING POINT 2

Core Content Objectives Addressed in this Domain

Students will:

Describe the impact Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Dutch

exploration and conquest in the Americas had on the English and

their decision to settle parts of North America

List and locate the three colonial regions: New England, Middle

Atlantic, and Southern

Locate the thirteen colonies of colonial America and identify each by

region

Locate and identify Charleston, Boston, New York, and Philadelphia

as important colonial cities, and explain why they flourished

Locate Roanoke Island in the Southern region and identify it as a

failed English colonization attempt

Explain why Roanoke is known as the “Lost Colony” Describe some of the reasons people came to North America from

England and other countries

Explain some of the early challenges faced by the English in

establishing colonies in North America

Describe the industries and other characteristics of the three colonial

regions

Describe how everyday life and economic industries in the three

colonial regions were shaped by geography and climate

Describe the relationship between the colonists and Native Americans

Describe the role of slavery in the colonial time period and why the

Southern colonies relied so much more heavily upon enslaved labor

than the Middle and New England colonies

Identify some of the key people relative to the settlement of each

colony

Identify Jamestown as the first permanently settled English colony in

North America, and recall that it was established in 1607

Identify the Discovery, Susan Constant, and Godspeed as the three

ships that brought the English settlers to Jamestown

Explain the term “starving time” as it relates to the Jamestown colony

Identify the three cash crops and their importance in the Southern

colonies: tobacco, rice, and indigo

Compare and contrast indentured servants and enslaved laborers

Identify 1619 as the year the first-known African laborers were brought

to the colonies

Explain that the first Africans in the English colonies came to

Jamestown as indentured servants, not enslaved laborers

Identify the three points of the triangular trading route—Europe, West

Africa, and North America—and the leg known as the Middle Passage

Compare and contrast the Pilgrims and the Puritans

Identify 1620 as the year the Pilgrims came to Plymouth on the

Mayflower

Explain why Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson were considered

religious dissenters Recall that John Cabot and Henry Hudson had previously explored

North America for England and the Netherlands, respectively

Explain why the Middle colonies were called “the breadbasket”

Explain that the Lower Counties of Pennsylvania became the colony

of Delaware

Provide reasons why the Middle Atlantic became one of the fastest

growing regions in colonial America

Describe everyday life in the colonies

Compare and contrast colonial life with the present day

Describe the many conflicts among the French, English, and Native

Americans

Describe why the colonists began to feel less and less like Europeans

Describe some of the events that led to the American Revolution

Explain the statements “no taxation without representation”; “one, if

by land, and two, if by sea”; “the shot heard round the world”; and

“give me liberty, or give me death!”

Identify some of the colonial leaders, and explain why they became

known as the “Founding Fathers” of the United States

Identify July 4, 1776, as the date the Founding Fathers approved the

Declaration of Independence

Activities

Image Review

Show the Flip Book images from any read-aloud again, and have

students retell the read-aloud using the images.

Image Card Review

Materials: Image Cards 1–25

In your hand, hold Image Cards 1–25 fanned out like a deck of cards. Ask

a student to choose a card but to not show it to anyone else in the class.

The student must then give a clue about the picture s/he is holding. For

example, for Paul Revere’s ride, a student may say, “I rode all night to

warn the colonists that the British were coming!” The rest of the class will

guess what or who is being described. Proceed to another card when the

correct answer has been given Acrostics Review

Materials: Thirteen Colonies Instructional Masters; class and/or

student acrostics

Have students review the regional and/or American Revolution acrostics

created as a class and/or individually. Have them use their worksheets

about the thirteen colonies to fill in any gaps they may still have in their

regional acrostics. You may wish to have students create new acrostics

based on what they have learned about the three colonial regions—the

Southern, New England, and Middle Atlantic—and the events leading up

to the American Revolution.

European Exploration Review

Show image 1A-1: European exploration of the Americas

Have students identify the continents displayed. Then have them identify

the countries in the key and the land areas each country explored and

settled between the 1500s and 1700s.

Remind students that Native Americans were living in North, Central, and

South America for many years before explorers from European countries

arrived, and that many Native Americans remained in some of these

areas.

Multiple-Meaning Word Activity:

Taxing

Show image 12A-2: Sons of Liberty protesting

1. What do you see in this image? [Remind students that in the image,

a group of colonists called the Sons of Liberty were protesting the

taxes that the king of Great Britian was forcing them to pay.]

2. In the read-aloud, you heard the word taxing in the sentence, “‘How

about taxing the colonists?’ [George Grenville] thought to himself.”

Remember, Grenville was the prime minister of Britain who was

trying to find a way for the king to come up with money to pay for the

French and Indian War. The king liked this idea and began taxing the

colonists. The word taxing here is a verb, and it means demanding

people to pay the government extra money for goods purchased

or money earned. This verb can also have the forms tax, taxes, and

taxed, such as in this example: “The king unfairly taxed the colonists.”

11:45-12:15                                        RECESS
12   12:15 – 1:00                                       LUNCH

12:1:00 – 2:00                                   CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9 LESSON 12

Extension

Respond to an Excerpt from

“A History of People in North

America”

Worksheet 12.1

Grammar Introduce Comparative and

Superlative Adjectives Using

more or most

Worksheet 12.2

Advance Preparation

Write the following sentences on the board or chart paper for use during

the Extension:

• Using the stars to navigate was a new idea long ago.

• Using a compass to navigate was a newer idea.

• However, using the stars and compass together was the newest

idea.

Display the comparative and superlative adjective poster:

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparative adjectives compare two nouns to show that one is

greater or more. The suffix –er is added to adjectives.

Superlative adjectives compare more than two nouns to show that

one is greatest or most. The suffix –est is added to adjectives.

Add the following to the poster:

Instead of the suffixes –er and –est, use the words more and most

when forming comparative and superlative adjectives that end with the

suffixes –ful, –less, –ing, –ed, –ous or that have three or more syllables. Place the following words on the board or chart paper and cover them

until the Grammar lesson:

peaceful

careless

tempting

interested

delicious

Respond to an Excerpt from “A History of People in North

America”

Worksheet 12.1

• Ask students to recall facts they have learned about explorers,

explorations, and settlements in North America. Answers may include:

• Many explorations happened between the 1400s and 1600s.

• Explorers searched for many valuable items during their

explorations, like spices, gold, and fur.

• Spanish and French settlements were built in different parts of

North America and fur trade developed between the French and

Native Americans.

• Sailing was not fun in those days and there wasn’t much to eat on

a ship.

• Many explorers went through hardships and some explorers died

during their travels. Ask students, “What is a superlative adjective?” (A superlative

adjective compares more than two nouns to show that one is greatest

or most. The suffix –est is added to adjectives.) Say, “For example,

a cat is a smart animal. A dog is a smarter animal. A human is the

smartest animal. Which word is the superlative adjective?” (smartest)

• Point to the first sentence you wrote on the board in advance and

read it aloud.

Using the stars to navigate was a new idea long ago.

• Ask students if there are comparative or superlative adjectives in this

sentence. (no)

• Tell students that in today’s lesson, they will read an excerpt from “A

History of People in North America” and respond to a writing prompt

related to the excerpt.

• Tell students that in writing a response, they may want to use

comparative and superlative adjectives to compare two or more

nouns.

• Ask students, “What is a comparative adjective?” (A comparative

adjective compares two nouns to show that one is greater or more.

The suffix –er is added to adjectives.) Say, “For example, a cat

is a smart animal. A dog is a smarter animal. Which word is the

comparative adjective?” (smarter)

Introduce Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Using more

or most

• Direct students’ attention to the comparative and superlative

adjectives poster you created and displayed in advance and read it

with them.

• Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

• Comparative adjectives compare two nouns to show that one is

greater or more. The suffix –er is added to adjectives.

• Superlative adjectives compare more than two nouns to show that

one is greatest or most. The suffix –est is added to adjectives.

• Ask students to give examples of comparative and superlative

adjectives they created in earlier lessons.

• Note for students that the examples they have practiced in previous

lessons have been adjectives with just one syllable, such as big,

deep, cute, and thin before adding the suffixes –er and –est.

• Remind students that when using two-syllable adjectives that end

with the letter ‘y’, the ‘y’ changes to an ‘i’ and then the suffixes –er or

–est are added.

• Tell students that in some cases, when forming comparative and

superlative adjectives, the suffixes –er and –est are not used but

rather the words more and most.

• Tell students that the times when the words more and most are used

are when you begin with some adjectives that have two syllables and

all adjectives that have three or more syllables.

• Uncover the words you placed on the board earlier. Note for students

that these examples are two- or three-syllable adjectives that end
rcise Materials Minute

2:00-2:50                                MATH/READING- Small group

 

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions  (READING A TO Z BOOK )
3:00  Dismissal                    Classroom Clean up

Thursday, April 20th , 2017

8:00-8:45                                                 PE

P
8:50-9:50                                 MATH

MATH/ Adding and Subtracting Meters and Centimeters in Compound Units

Objectives: Add and subtract meters and centimeters in compound units.

Teaching strategies: Write in the board ‘2 m 60 cm + 25 cm= Ask students how they get the answer. Tell students that since there are no meters in front of 25 cm, they can just add the centimeters. The sum of 60 cm and 25 cm is 85 cm. Write on the board ‘2 m 60 cm +25 – 2 m 85 cm’
Assess: Have students do tasks 14-15, TB p.12

Practice: Exercise 1,p. 113-114

Extra Practice: 1, p. 113-114

Tests: 1A and 1B,p. 1-6
6.2 Introduction to Kilometers

Objectives: Understand the kilometer as a unit of measurement. Convert a measurement in kilometers and meters and vice versa

Materials: Map of buildings around school, Map of cities closest to school

Teaching Strategies: Have students look at TB p.13. Bring to their attention that a bus is about 10 m long. Tell students to imagine 10 meter sticks lying end to end. Say that the total length of the stick is 10 m. Tell students that to get 1 kilometer, imagine 100 such buses parked front to end. Or, they can imagine 1000 meter sticks placed end to end. A kilometer is little more than half a mile. Write “ on the board” 1 km=1000 m

Use a familiar landmark near the school that is about 1 km away. Draw a roughly scaled map on the board showing the school the landmark and indicate the distance of 1 km . Using the map or list, ask students how far it is to ___ from_______ in meters. Tell students that sometimes they may get mixed up between centimeters and kilometers. Here’s a way to help them remember. The prefix centi means ‘a hundred. For an example, a centipede has 100 legs. There are 100 cents in a dollar. 100 centimeters= 1  meter. The prefix ‘kilo-’ means thousand. 1 kilometer= 1000 meters.

Assess:  Have students do tasks 1-6, TB p. 14-15

Practice: WB Exercise 4,p. 11-14
Word Problems / Practice B

Objectives : Solve word problems involving the subtraction of money.

Practice adding and subtracting money.

Practice word problems involving addition and subtraction of money

Teaching Strategies: Have student work on tasks 10 and 11 on their own before discussing their answer. You can also call upon a student to present the solution.

Call some students to explain how they solved the problems and if their answers are reasonable. Provide any reteaching  of concepts that may be necessary.

Practice: Workbook Exercise 5, p.77-80, Exercise 3, p. 159-162
9:50 – 10:30                            CKLA EXTENIONS

Riddles for Core Content

Ask students riddles such as the following to review core content:

• We are two groups of people who were already living in the area that

became the colony of New York when the English took it over. Who

are we? (Native Americans and the Dutch)

• I took the land from the Dutch and established the colonies of New

York and New Jersey for England. Who am I? (the Duke of York)

• I am the nickname given to the Middle Atlantic colonies because they

produced so much wheat and flour. What am I? (“the breadbasket”)

• I designed the city of Philadelphia, which means city of brotherly love.

Who am I? (William Penn)

• I am the Founding Father known for the saying “Give me liberty, or

give me death!” Who am I? (Patrick Henry)

• I was approved on July 4, 1776. What am I? (the Declaration of

Independence)

• We are four important colonial cities on harbors that are still thriving

today. What are we? (Charles Town (Charleston), Boston, Philadelphia,

New York City)

• We are the main industries of the New England colonies. What are

we? (timber, fishing, shipbuilding, furs)

Venn Diagram

Materials: Instructional Master PP2-1; chart paper, chalkboard, or

whiteboard

Tell students that together you are going to compare and contrast

two things or people students have learned about during the Colonial

America domain by asking how they are similar and how they are

Different.

Writing Prompts

Students may be given an additional writing prompt such as the

following:

• The most interesting thing I’ve learned thus far is because . . .

• If I could choose to live in one Middle colony, I would

choose because . . .

• The relationship between the colonists and Native American groups

was . . .

• If I were living in the colonial era, I would be a Patriot/Loyalist

because . . .

• The date July 4, 1776, is significant in U.S. history because . . .
10:30-11:00                             COMPASS LEARNING
11:00-11:45                                     CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 ASSESSMENT

 

Domain Assessment

Note: You may wish to have some students do the three parts of

this assessment in two or three sittings. Some students may need

help reading the questions. You may wish to allow some students to

respond orally.

Part I (Instructional Master DA-1)

Directions: Look at the numbers on the map and in the regional key.

Then, look at the words below the map. Write the number on the blank

beside the correct word.

1. (New England)

2. (Boston)

3. (Plymouth)

4. (Middle Atlantic)

5. (New York City)

6. (Philadelphia)

7. (Southern)

8. (Jamestown)

9. (Charles Town)

10. (Savannah

Part II (Instructional Master DA-2)

Directions: Read along as I read the questions and possible answers.

Circle the choice that best answers each question.

1. Which of the following people were not exploring and settling in the

Americas at the time the English started establishing colonies? (A—

Greek)

2. Which of the following was not an important city in colonial America?

(C—Springfield)

3. Which of the following became known as the “Lost Colony”? (D—

Roanoke)

4. In what year did the colonists arrive in Jamestown? (D—1607)

5. In what year were the first-known African laborers brought to the

colonies? (A—1619)

6. In what year did the Pilgrims arrive in Plymouth? (B—1620)

7. On what date did the Founding Fathers approve of the Declaration of

Independence? (C—July 4, 1776)

8. Which of the following colonies was the first to be successfully

settled? (B—Jamestown)

9. Which of the following was not one of the three ships that brought the

English to Jamestown? (B—Mayflower)

10. Which of the following was not a cash crop in the Southern colonies?

(C—wheat) Part III (Instructional Master DA-3)

Note: You may wish to have some students write more sentences or

have some students focus only on responding to one or two questions or

statements.

Directions: Read along as I read each statement. Write two or three

complete sentences to respond to each statement. Some of the

statements give you a choice of topic.

1. Explain some of the reasons people came to North America from

England and other countries, and describe some of the challenges

they faced in the colonies.

2. Choose one colony, and describe some of the people involved in its

settlement.

3. Choose one of the following pairs to compare and contrast: Pilgrims

and Puritans; indentured servants and enslaved laborers; everyday

colonial life and your present-day life.

4. Describe the main industries of the three colonial regions.

5. Describe some of the events that occurred after the thirteen colonies

were established that led to the American Revolution. Include one of

the following statements in your description, and explain its meaning:

“no taxation without representation”; “one, if by land, and two, if by

sea”; “the shot heard round the world”; “give me liberty, or give me

death!”
11:45-12:15                                   RECESS
12:15-1:00                                       LUNCH

1:00 – 2:00                          CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9 LESSON 13
Assessment Student Skills Assessment Worksheet 13.1 50

Optional Assessment of

Fluency

“Christopher Columbus and

John Cabot: Parallel Lives” Worksheet 13.2

Student Skills Assessment

Worksheet 13.1

• Have students tear out Worksheet 13.1.

• Tell students they will read three selections printed on Worksheet

13.1 and answer comprehension, morphology, grammar, and spelling

questions that follow each selection. Tell students that should they feel tired, it’s a good idea to take a short,

personal break. Explain to students that they need to respect the

others in the classroom and stay seated, while quietly looking up to the

ceiling, stretching their shoulders, and taking a deep breath or two.

• Tell students they should go right on to the second selection once

they have finished the first and right on to the third selection once

they have finished the second.

• Encourage students to do their best.

• Once students finish all three selections, encourage them to review

their papers, rereading and looking over their answers carefully.

• Again, explain the necessity of respecting that not all classmates

will finish at the same time, and, if they finish and have checked their

papers, they should remain quiet and allow others to finish.

Note to Teacher

When time permits, score these assessments using the guidelines at the

end of this lesson to evaluate each student’s mastery of the skills taught

in this unit.

If additional practice is needed to remediate skills students have not

mastered, materials are available in the Pausing Point. Instructions for Student Fluency Assessment

Turn to the text copy of “Christopher Columbus and John Cabot: Parallel

Lives” at the end of this lesson. This is the text copy students will read

aloud.

Ask the student to remove Worksheet 13.2 from his/her Workbook. You

will use this worksheet to mark as a running record as you listen to the

student read orally.

Tell the student that you are going to ask him or her to read the selection

aloud. Explain that you are going to keep a record of the amount of

time it takes him or her to read the selection. Please also explain to the

student that he/she should not rush but rather read and his/her own

regular pace.

Begin timing when the student reads the first word of the selection. If you

are using a watch, write the exact Start Time, in minutes and seconds, on

your record page. If you are using a stopwatch, you do not need to write

down the start time as the stopwatch will calculate Elapsed Time. As the

student reads the selection, make a running record on the copy with the

student’s name using the following guidelines.

Words read correctly No mark is required.

Omissions Draw a long dash above the word omitted.

Insertions Write a caret (^) at the point where the insertion was made. If you

have time, write down the word that was inserted.

Words read incorrectly Write an “X” above the word.

Substitutions Write the substitution above the word.

Self-corrected errors Replace original error mark with an “SC.”

Teacher-supplied words Write a “T” above the word (counts as an error). When the student finishes reading the chapter, write the exact Finish Time

in minutes and seconds on your record sheet. Alternatively, if you are

using a stopwatch, simply write down the Elapsed Time in minutes and

seconds. If the student does not read to the end, draw a vertical line on

the record sheet to indicate how far he/she read before you stopped him/

her. Also write down either the Finish Time or the Elapsed Time. After the

student finishes reading orally, you may direct him/her to finish reading the

remainder of the selection silently; you may also assess comprehension

by having the student complete the comprehension questions orally.

Oral Comprehension Questions on “Christopher

Columbus and John Cabot: Parallel Lives”

1. Which explorers are compared in the article? (Christopher

Columbus and John Cabot)

2. What are some similarities between Columbus and Cabot? (both

important explorers, lived at the same time, were about the same

age, were Italian, studied maps, went on three voyages)

3. What are some differences? (Columbus was a sailor and Cabot

was a merchant. They had different views on the best way to

reach the Indies. Columbus became famous and Cabot was not.)

4. What did Cabot think was wrong about Columbus’ approach to

exploration? (Cabot felt it would be shorter to go north over the

top of Earth rather than the longer way around the equator.)

5. Why did Columbus end up famous and Cabot did not?

(Columbus met with success in arriving on land that he thought

was the Indies, while Cabot never met with success.)

Repeat this process for additional students. Scoring can be done later,

provided you have kept running records and jotted down either the

Elapsed Time or the Start Time and the Finish Time.

Guidelines for Calculating W.C.P.M. Scores

If the reading was fairly accurate (< 10 uncorrected errors), you can get a

rough (and easy) estimate of a student’s W.C.P.M. score simply by noting

the time and looking at the chart on Worksheet 13.2.

To calculate a student’s exact W.C.P.M. score, use the information you

wrote down on the record sheet and follow the steps below. The steps

are also shown in graphic form on Worksheet 13.2. You will probably find it helpful to have a calculator available.

1. First, complete the Words section of Worksheet 13.2.

2. Count Words Read. This is the total number of words that the

student read or attempted to read, up to the point where he or

she stopped. It includes words that the student read correctly

as well as words that the student read incorrectly or skipped

over. If the student attempted to read the whole selection,

use 467 words total. If the student did not finish the selection,

you will need to count the number of words that the student

actually attempted to read. Write the count for Words Read in

the matching box on Worksheet 13.2.

3. Count the Uncorrected Mistakes noted in your running record.

This includes words read incorrectly, omissions, substitutions,

and words that you had to supply. Write the total in the box

labeled Uncorrected Mistakes on Worksheet 13.2. (A mistake

that is corrected by the student is not counted as a mistake;

the student is penalized for the time he or she lost making the

correction, but not for the initial mistake.)

4. Subtract Uncorrected Mistakes from Words Read to get Words

Correct.

5. Next, complete the Time section of the worksheet.

 
2:00-2:50                                     MATH/READING- Small group
Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions  (READING A TO Z BOOK )
3:00 Dismissal                         Classroom Clean up
Friday April 21st, 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials                             MUSIC/DRAMA

P
8:50-9:50                                              MATH

MATH
Practice C / Fraction of a Whole

Objectives: Practice converting money between dollars and cents. Practice multiplying and dividing money. Practice word problems involving multiplication and division.

Recognize and name fraction of a whole.

Make a whole a fraction

Teaching Strategies : Have students do Textbook p. 82, Practice C

Write a fraction on the board. An example is shown on the right. Ask students to draw a picture to show what this means. They may draw any shape, such as a square, rectangle, or a circle and divide that into 4 parts.

Practice: Have students do Textbook p. 82, Practice C, Workbook Exercise 1, p. 90-95
Comparing and Ordering Fractions

Objectives: Understand the terms numerator and denominator. Compare and order fractions with a common numerator. Compare and order fractions with a common denominator.

Teaching Strategies: Draw on the board a large fraction bar divided into sevenths, as shown on the right. Ask students what fraction of the bar is shaded. Tell students that 3 sevenths is shaded.

Practice: Workbook Exercise 2, p. 96-97
Instant activity: Geometry Problem on the board 10mins

Session: Review Problems 15mins

Independent work: 15mins

Review & Check: 10mins

Small Group: 30mins

Competition: Around the World end of class

Math  Review (Division, Fractions, Time)

Division Review: Objectives: Find the quotient of tens, hundreds or thousands by a 1 digit number using estimation.

Write “356 divided by 3 equals” on the whiteboard. Remind the students that it is always a good idea to estimate the answer in advance so that they know whether their actual answer makes sense. Ask students for the estimate of 356 divided by 3. Tell students to round 356 first. Ask students how they would round 356. They may round it to the nearest hundred.

Write “ 400 divided by 3 equals”? On the whiteboard. Ask students if there will be a remainder. (yes) Tell students since they cannot round it to the nearest hundred, 00, they can try rounding it to the nearest ten. Ask students which ten they should round it to. Tell students they can look at 330 or 360 as such numbers are divisible by 3.
Consider 330 divided by 3 and 360 divided by 4, which is better estimate? Write the above equations on the whiteboard. Tell students that 356 is nearer to 360 than to 330, so 330 divided by 3 is a better estimate. Ask students for the estimated quotient. Tell them that the estimated quotient is 120. Have students to workout the actual quotient. Give students ample time to work out the answer. Then tell them the answer is 8 R 2. So the actual answer is reasonable.

Asses: Have students do tasks 9-11, TB p. 136

Practice: WB exercise 5, p. 91-92

Extra practice: Exercise 5,p. 91-92

9:50- 10:30                                      CKLA EXTENIONS

Small Group: Remediation and Enrichment

• When having students work in small groups, please remember to

choose activities that fit students’ needs at the time.

›. Small Group 1: Work with these students on any weak areas

that were exhibited on the assessment. You may wish to use the

Assessment and Remediation Guide and/or worksheets found in the

Pausing Point with these students.

›. Small Group 2: Ask these students to read a chapter or two of their

choice from The Age of Exploration or More Classic Tales.

10:30-11:00                                COMPASS LEARNING
11:00 -11:45                                   CKLA/LL DOMAIN 11 LESSON 1
Introducing the Read-Aloud

Domain Introduction

Essential Background

Information or Terms

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Animals and Their Habitats

Image Cards 1–5 map of North America

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions 15

Word Work: Tolerant 5

Show image 1A-5: Ecosystems of species

Ask students to describe what they see in the image. Guide them to

discuss all of the living things they can see. Tell students that all over the

world, from areas as wide as the ocean to areas as small as a puddle

on the sidewalk, life exists. Explain that some forms of life are easy to

see—for example, humans or flowers—whereas other forms of life can

only be viewed by using a microscope—for example, bacteria or some

types of plankton. Tell students that each life form is suited to live in a

certain place. For example, fish have gills that allow them to breathe

and live in water. Ask students, “Who remembers the name for the place

where an animal or plant is specially suited to live and grow?” (habitat)

Tell students that they are going to learn more about the different types

of habitats.

Tell students that for the next several days, they will hear about the

different places where both living and nonliving things exist and how they interact with one another. Share with students that they will also learn

more about the feeding relationships between living organisms, and how

humans can take better care of the earth.

Essential Background Information or Terms

Tell students that they will learn about something called “the balance of

nature.” Ask students, “If something is balanced, what does that mean?”

(It is in harmony; all parts have an equal amount.) Ask students to recall

the groups of people they learned about recently who tried to live in

“long-term” balance with nature. (the Native Americans)

Tell students that at times, the balance of nature is thrown off by different

events. Ask students to think about what types of things might throw

off the balance of nature. Remind students that the titles of stories can

often give us clues as to what the content is about. Read students the

titles of Read-Alouds 5 and 6—“Natural Changes to the Environment,”

and “Human Changes to the Environment”—and tell students that both

nature and humans are responsible at times for throwing off the balance

of nature.

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully to learn more about animals and their

homes. Tell students to listen for the main ideas, or the most important

points, of this read-aloud, and let them know you will ask them to

summarize these main ideas after they hear the read-aloud.

Comprehension Questions

If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent

passages of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. If students

give one-word answers and/or fail to use read-aloud or domain vocabulary

in their responses, acknowledge correct responses by expanding the

students’ responses using richer and more complex language 1. Literal If someone studies the field of science called ecology, what

do they examine? (the relationships between living things and their

environment) What is this person called? (an ecologist)

2. Literal What is a habitat? (the special home of a certain species) What

are some examples of habitats that you heard in the read-aloud? (soil,

low-lying branches, trees, etc.)

3. Literal What makes up an ecosystem? (animals’ habitats, including

living and nonliving things) What are some examples of ecosystems

that you heard in the read-aloud? (tundra, forests, oceans, streams,

ponds, lakes, savannas, deserts, etc.)

4. Compare and contrast ecosystems and habitats. (They

are alike because they are both homes for living things; they are

different because a habitat is the preferred, usually smaller, home of

a plant or animal, but an ecosystem includes an entire community,

usually larger, of both living organisms and nonliving things.

Interactions between living and nonliving things are the important part

in an ecosystem, rather than just a place that provides a home.)

5. We know that organisms become tolerant of their

habitats through adaptation. One example of this is algae clinging to

rocks so it won’t wash away. Name other examples of these kinds of

adaptations you heard about in the read-aloud. (Answers may vary,

but may include succulents storing water in their stems, allowing them

to live in the arid desert; the arctic fox having a short, round body

and lots of fur, allowing it to survive in extreme cold; the antelope

migrating and running very fast, allowing it to survive in the grassland.)

6. How would you summarize the main ideas of today’s

read-aloud? (Ecology is the study of the environments of living things.

Animals have adapted in ways that make them well-suited to live in

certain habitats. Habitats are homes which make up ecosystems;

ecosystems include living and nonliving things. All living and nonliving

things in habitats and ecosystems are interconnected.)

I am going to ask you a question. I will give you a minute to think about

the question, and then I will ask you to turn to your neighbor and discuss

the question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you

discussed with your partner.

7. Think Pair Share: Today you heard that both living and

nonliving things are part of an ecosystem. Can you think of a way in

which nonliving things, such as rocks or sand, help animals survive?

(Answers may vary, but may include that rocks provide shade, the

sand is a place an animal could burrow in to hide, etc.)

8. After hearing today’s read-aloud and comprehension questions and

answers, do you have any remaining questions?

You may wish to allow time for individual, group, or class research of

the text and/or other resources to answer any remaining questions.

11:45-12:15                                        RECESS
12:15-1:00                                           LUNCH

1:00-2:00                                       CKLA SKILLS  UNIT 9 LESSON 14
Grammar Introduce Irregular Comparative

and Superlative Adjectives Worksheet 14.1

Spelling Assessment

 

Advance Preparation

Display the comparative and superlative adjectives poster:

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparative adjectives compare two nouns to show that one is

greater or more. The suffix –er is added to adjectives.

Superlative adjectives compare more than two nouns to show that

one is greatest or most. The suffix –est is added to adjectives.

Instead of the suffixes –er and –est, use the words more and most

when forming comparative and superlative adjectives that end with

the suffixes –ful, –less, –ing, –ed, –ous or that have three or more

syllables.

Create and cover a poster entitled “Irregular Comparative and

Superlative Adjectives” for use during the Grammar lesson:

Irregular Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Word Comparative Superlative

good better best

bad worse worst

much more most

little less least

far farther farthest

many more most

Introduce Irregular Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Worksheet 14.1

• Direct students’ attention to the comparative and superlative

adjectives poster you displayed in advance and review it with them.

• Remind students that the suffixes –er and –est are added to

adjectives to show comparison.

• Remind students that the words more or most are added to some

adjectives to show comparison.

• Have students fill in the blanks orally as you read the following

sentences.

Pausing Point Worksheet PP5.

1. (quiet) Tom is a quiet boy but his brother is a boy. (quieter,

comparative)

2. (few) Of all of my sisters in my family, I have the number

of dolls. (fewest, superlative)

3. ( jolly) My uncle is a person than my aunt. ( jollier,

comparative)

4. (adorable) That brand new puppy is the animal in the

whole pet shop! (most adorable, superlative) Have students fill in the blanks as you read the following sentences,

using the words on the poster.

1. (good) My sister makes spaghetti. My mom

makes spaghetti than my sister. My grandmother makes

the spaghetti of all. (good, better, best)

2. (bad) Wendy had a day at school, that got by noon

when she began to feel sick. The thing that happened that

day was that she had to go home early and she missed the class

birthday party. (bad, worse, worst)

3. (much) How soup would you like? I have finished my first

bowl of soup and would like , please. My big brother ate

the soup of all of us. (much, more, most)

4. (little) How water can you drink in a day? I bet I can drink

even than that! Our friend drinks the amount of

water of anyone I know. (little, less, least)

5. (far) How away is your school from your house? My school

is away than that! The distance we drive is to my

cousin’s school, which is in a different city. (far, farther, farthest)

6. (many) How pieces of candy did you get in your bag? My

bag is bigger so I think I got pieces of candy than you did.

Look at our teacher’s bag! She must have gotten the of

all! (many, more, most)

 
2:00-2:50                                     MATH/READING- Small group
Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions

(READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal                         Classroom Clean up