LESSON PLANS APRIL 24-28, 2017

LESSON PLANS
8.00-8.45                                                  PE
8:50-9:50                                              MATH

MATH
Practice C / Fraction of a Whole

Objectives: Practice converting money between dollars and cents. Practice multiplying and dividing money. Practice word problems involving multiplication and division.

Recognize and name fraction of a whole.

Make a whole a fraction

Teaching Strategies : Have students do Textbook p. 82, Practice C

Write a fraction on the board. An example is shown on the right. Ask students to draw a picture to show what this means. They may draw any shape, such as a square, rectangle, or a circle and divide that into 4 parts.

Practice: Have students do Textbook p. 82, Practice C, Workbook Exercise 1, p. 90-95
Comparing and Ordering Fractions

Objectives: Understand the terms numerator and denominator. Compare and order fractions with a common numerator. Compare and order fractions with a common denominator.

Teaching Strategies: Draw on the board a large fraction bar divided into sevenths, as shown on the right. Ask students what fraction of the bar is shaded. Tell students that 3 sevenths is shaded.

Practice: Workbook Exercise 2, p. 96-97
Instant activity: Geometry Problem on the board 10mins

Session: Review Problems 15mins

Independent work: 15mins

Review & Check: 10mins

Small Group: 30mins

Competition: Around the World end of class

Math  Review (Division, Fractions, Time)

Division Review: Objectives: Find the quotient of tens, hundreds or thousands by a 1 digit number using estimation.

Write “356 divided by 3 equals” on the whiteboard. Remind the students that it is always a good idea to estimate the answer in advance so that they know whether their actual answer makes sense. Ask students for the estimate of 356 divided by 3. Tell students to round 356 first. Ask students how they would round 356. They may round it to the nearest hundred.

Write “ 400 divided by 3 equals”? On the whiteboard. Ask students if there will be a remainder. (yes) Tell students since they cannot round it to the nearest hundred, 00, they can try rounding it to the nearest ten. Ask students which ten they should round it to. Tell students they can look at 330 or 360 as such numbers are divisible by 3.
Consider 330 divided by 3 and 360 divided by 4, which is better estimate? Write the above equations on the whiteboard. Tell students that 356 is nearer to 360 than to 330, so 330 divided by 3 is a better estimate. Ask students for the estimated quotient. Tell them that the estimated quotient is 120. Have students to workout the actual quotient. Give students ample time to work out the answer. Then tell them the answer is 8 R 2. So the actual answer is reasonable.

Asses: Have students do tasks 9-11, TB p. 136

Practice: WB exercise 5, p. 91-92

Extra practice: Exercise 5,p. 91-92

9:50- 10:30                                      CKLA EXTENIONS

Small Group: Remediation and Enrichment

• When having students work in small groups, please remember to

choose activities that fit students’ needs at the time.

›. Small Group 1: Work with these students on any weak areas

that were exhibited on the assessment. You may wish to use the

Assessment and Remediation Guide and/or worksheets found in the

Pausing Point with these students.

›. Small Group 2: Ask these students to read a chapter or two of their

choice from The Age of Exploration or More Classic Tales.

10:30-11:00                                COMPASS LEARNING
11:00 -11:45                                   CKLA/LL DOMAIN 11 LESSON 1
Introducing the Read-Aloud

Domain Introduction

Essential Background

Information or Terms

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Animals and Their Habitats

Image Cards 1–5 map of North America

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions 15

Word Work: Tolerant 5

Show image 1A-5: Ecosystems of species

Ask students to describe what they see in the image. Guide them to

discuss all of the living things they can see. Tell students that all over the

world, from areas as wide as the ocean to areas as small as a puddle

on the sidewalk, life exists. Explain that some forms of life are easy to

see—for example, humans or flowers—whereas other forms of life can

only be viewed by using a microscope—for example, bacteria or some

types of plankton. Tell students that each life form is suited to live in a

certain place. For example, fish have gills that allow them to breathe

and live in water. Ask students, “Who remembers the name for the place

where an animal or plant is specially suited to live and grow?” (habitat)

Tell students that they are going to learn more about the different types

of habitats.

Tell students that for the next several days, they will hear about the

different places where both living and nonliving things exist and how they interact with one another. Share with students that they will also learn

more about the feeding relationships between living organisms, and how

humans can take better care of the earth.

Essential Background Information or Terms

Tell students that they will learn about something called “the balance of

nature.” Ask students, “If something is balanced, what does that mean?”

(It is in harmony; all parts have an equal amount.) Ask students to recall

the groups of people they learned about recently who tried to live in

“long-term” balance with nature. (the Native Americans)

Tell students that at times, the balance of nature is thrown off by different

events. Ask students to think about what types of things might throw

off the balance of nature. Remind students that the titles of stories can

often give us clues as to what the content is about. Read students the

titles of Read-Alouds 5 and 6—“Natural Changes to the Environment,”

and “Human Changes to the Environment”—and tell students that both

nature and humans are responsible at times for throwing off the balance

of nature.

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully to learn more about animals and their

homes. Tell students to listen for the main ideas, or the most important

points, of this read-aloud, and let them know you will ask them to

summarize these main ideas after they hear the read-aloud.

Comprehension Questions

If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent

passages of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. If students

give one-word answers and/or fail to use read-aloud or domain vocabulary

in their responses, acknowledge correct responses by expanding the

students’ responses using richer and more complex language 1. Literal If someone studies the field of science called ecology, what

do they examine? (the relationships between living things and their

environment) What is this person called? (an ecologist)

2. Literal What is a habitat? (the special home of a certain species) What

are some examples of habitats that you heard in the read-aloud? (soil,

low-lying branches, trees, etc.)

3. Literal What makes up an ecosystem? (animals’ habitats, including

living and nonliving things) What are some examples of ecosystems

that you heard in the read-aloud? (tundra, forests, oceans, streams,

ponds, lakes, savannas, deserts, etc.)

4. Compare and contrast ecosystems and habitats. (They

are alike because they are both homes for living things; they are

different because a habitat is the preferred, usually smaller, home of

a plant or animal, but an ecosystem includes an entire community,

usually larger, of both living organisms and nonliving things.

Interactions between living and nonliving things are the important part

in an ecosystem, rather than just a place that provides a home.)

5. We know that organisms become tolerant of their

habitats through adaptation. One example of this is algae clinging to

rocks so it won’t wash away. Name other examples of these kinds of

adaptations you heard about in the read-aloud. (Answers may vary,

but may include succulents storing water in their stems, allowing them

to live in the arid desert; the arctic fox having a short, round body

and lots of fur, allowing it to survive in extreme cold; the antelope

migrating and running very fast, allowing it to survive in the grassland.)

6. How would you summarize the main ideas of today’s

read-aloud? (Ecology is the study of the environments of living things.

Animals have adapted in ways that make them well-suited to live in

certain habitats. Habitats are homes which make up ecosystems;

ecosystems include living and nonliving things. All living and nonliving

things in habitats and ecosystems are interconnected.)

I am going to ask you a question. I will give you a minute to think about

the question, and then I will ask you to turn to your neighbor and discuss

the question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you

discussed with your partner.

7. Think Pair Share: Today you heard that both living and

nonliving things are part of an ecosystem. Can you think of a way in

which nonliving things, such as rocks or sand, help animals survive?

(Answers may vary, but may include that rocks provide shade, the

sand is a place an animal could burrow in to hide, etc.)

8. After hearing today’s read-aloud and comprehension questions and

answers, do you have any remaining questions?

You may wish to allow time for individual, group, or class research of

the text and/or other resources to answer any remaining questions.

11:45-12:15                                        RECESS
12:15-1:00                                           LUNCH

• Remind students that the suffixes –er and –est are added to

adjectives to show comparison.

• Remind students that the words more or most are added to some

adjectives to show comparison.

• Have students fill in the blanks orally as you read the following

sentences.

Pausing 1:00-2:00            CKLA SKILLS  UNIT 9 LESSON 14
Grammar Introduce Irregular Comparative

and Superlative Adjectives Worksheet 14.1

Spelling Assessment
Advance Preparation

Display the comparative and superlative adjectives poster:

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparative adjectives compare two nouns to show that one is

greater or more. The suffix –er is added to adjectives.

Superlative adjectives compare more than two nouns to show that

one is greatest or most. The suffix –est is added to adjectives.

Instead of the suffixes –er and –est, use the words more and most

when forming comparative and superlative adjectives that end with

the suffixes –ful, –less, –ing, –ed, –ous or that have three or more

syllables.

Create and cover a poster entitled “Irregular Comparative and

Superlative Adjectives” for use during the Grammar lesson:

Irregular Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Word Comparative Superlative

good better best

bad worse worst

much more most

little less least

is away than that! The distance we drive is to my

cousin’s school, which is in a different city. (far, farther, farthest)

6. (many) How pieces of candy did you get in your bag? My

bag is bigger so I think I got pieces of candy than you did.

Look at our teacher’s bag! She must have gotten the of

all! (many, more, most)

 
2:00-2:50                                     MATH/READING- Small group
Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story tfar farther farthest

many more most

Introduce Irregular Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Worksheet 14.1

• Direct students’ attention to the comparative and superlative

adjectives poster you displayed in advance and review it with them.

Point Worksheet PP5.

1. (quiet) Tom is a quiet boy but his brother is a boy. (quieter,

comparative)

2. (few) Of all of my sisters in my family, I have the number

of dolls. (fewest, superlative)

3. ( jolly) My uncle is a person than my aunt. ( jollier,

comparative)

4. (adorable) That brand new puppy is the animal in the

whole pet shop! (most adorable, superlative) Have students fill in the blanks as you read the following sentences,

using the words on the poster.

1. (good) My sister makes spaghetti. My mom

makes spaghetti than my sister. My grandmother makes

the spaghetti of all. (good, better, best)

2. (bad) Wendy had a day at school, that got by noon

when she began to feel sick. The thing that happened that

day was that she had to go home early and she missed the class

birthday party. (bad, worse, worst)

3. (much) How soup would you like? I have finished my first

bowl of soup and would like , please. My big brother ate

the soup of all of us. (much, more, most)

4. (little) How water can you drink in a day? I bet I can drink

even than that! Our friend drinks the amount of

water of anyone I know. (little, less, least)

5. (far) How away is your school from your house? My school

o read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions

(READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal                         Classroom Clean up

Tuesday,April 25th, 2017

8:00-8:45                                           ART
8:50-9:50                                           MATH

Mathematics

 

Adding and Subtracting Meters and Centimeters in Compound Units

Objectives: Add and subtract meters and centimeters in compound units.

Teaching strategies: Write in the board ‘2 m 60 cm + 25 cm= Ask students how they get the answer. Tell students that since there are no meters in front of 25 cm, they can just add the centimeters. The sum of 60 cm and 25 cm is 85 cm. Write on the board ‘2 m 60 cm +25 – 2 m 85 cm’
Assess: Have students do tasks 14-15, TB p.12

Practice: Exercise 1,p. 113-114

Extra Practice: 1, p. 113-114

Tests: 1A and 1B,p. 1-6
6.2 Introduction to Kilometers

Objectives: Understand the kilometer as a unit of measurement. Convert a measurement in kilometers and meters and vice versa

Materials: Map of buildings around school, Map of cities closest to school

Teaching Strategies: Have students look at TB p.13. Bring to their attention that a bus is about 10 m long. Tell students to imagine 10 meter sticks lying end to end. Say that the total length of the stick is 10 m. Tell students that to get 1 kilometer, imagine 100 such buses parked front to end. Or, they can imagine 1000 meter sticks placed end to end. A kilometer is little more than half a mile. Write “ on the board” 1 km=1000 m

Use a familiar landmark near the school that is about 1 km away. Draw a roughly scaled map on the board showing the school the landmark and indicate the distance of 1 km . Using the map or list, ask students how far it is to ___ from_______ in meters. Tell students that sometimes they may get mixed up between centimeters and kilometers. Here’s a way to help them remember. The prefix centi means ‘a hundred. For an example, a centipede has 100 legs. There are 100 cents in a dollar. 100 centimeters= 1  meter. The prefix ‘kilo-’ means thousand. 1 kilometer= 1000 meters.

Assess:  Have students do tasks 1-6, TB p. 14-15

Practice: WB Exercise 4,p. 11-14
Word Problems / Practice B

Objectives : Solve word problems involving the subtraction of money

Practice adding and subtracting money.

Practice word problems involving addition and subtraction of money

Teaching Strategies: Have student work on tasks 10 and 11 on their own before discussing their answer. You can also call upon a student to present the solution.

Call some students to explain how they solved the problems and if their answers are reasonable. Provide any reteaching  of concepts that may be necessary.

Practice: Workbook Exercise 5, p.77-80, Exercise 3, p. 159-162

9:50- 10:30                                CKLA EXTENIONS

Which Ecosystem Am I?

Explain to students that you will read clues to them about the

ecosystems they have heard about today. Once they have listened to the

clues, ask students to predict which ecosystem you are describing. After

students have made their predictions, show them the relevant images

below. Have them explain how the clues you have read described this

ecosystem. Encourage students to share other adaptations of plants and

animals in each.

1. This ecosystem can vary greatly according to where it is located in

the world.

It may receive a lot of rain, it may have trees with pine cones, or it

may have deciduous trees that drop their leaves.

Animals living here may have characteristics or adaptations that allow

them to balance on or climb trees, such as having claws; birds may

have beaks that are well designed for opening seeds or sipping nectar.

What is the name of this ecosystem? (forest)

§§ Show image 1A-8 and Image Card 1 (Temperate Deciduous and

Tropical Rainforest)

2. This ecosystem is arid and receives very little rainfall. In North

America, it includes plateaus, mesas, and buttes.

Plants have adapted in various ways, such as storing water in their

stems, having long root systems to get water from a distance, and

being spaced apart to avoid competing for water.

Some animals have adapted to the arid climate by having waxy

bodies, whereas others can store water, enabling them to go without

it for relatively long periods of time.

What is the name of this ecosystem? (desert) Show image 1A-9 and Image Card 2 (Sonoran Desert)

3. In this ecosystem, there are few trees.

The amount of rainfall and the types of grasses vary.

There are few places for animals to hide from their enemies, so some

animals have adapted by being able to run very quickly.

This ecosystem can also be referred to as grasslands.

What is the name of this ecosystem? (savanna)

§§ Show image 1A-10 and Image Card 3 (East African Savanna)

4. This ecosystem has shrubs but does not have trees.

It is located near the North Pole, and it is cold for most of the year.

During the winter, it is dark all the time, and very little vegetation

exists.

One animal that is well adapted for this ecosystem is the arctic fox;

it has thick fur, and little skin is exposed to the cold. The caribou

migrates from this region in the winter.

What is the name of this ecosystem? (tundra)

§§ Show image 1A-11 and Image Card 4 (Arctic Tundra)

5. This ecosystem may have fresh water, or it may have salt water.

It can cover a huge amount of space, or take up a very little amount of

space.

One characteristic of animals living here is the presence of gills to

breathe under water.

What is the name of this ecosystem? (Several different answers are

acceptable, including freshwater, saltwater, oceans, lakes, ponds,

rivers, streams, aquatic, etc.)

§§ Show image 1A-12 and Image Card 5 (Freshwater and Saltwater

Habitats)

Where Do I Belong?

Display Image Cards 1–5 in columns on the wall or spread them out on

a table. Guide students in placing Image Cards 6–27 under the correct

ecosystem. Some animals, such as the insects and millipedes, will apply

to more than one ecosystem and may be placed in their own column.

10:30- 11:00                             COMPASS LEARNING
11:00- 11:45                                     CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 LESSON 2

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned? Image Cards 1–5

What Do We Know? chart paper, chalkboard, or

whiteboard

Making Predictions About the

Read-Aloud

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Food Chains, Part I

Image Cards 27–29;

chart paper, chalkboard, or

whiteboard

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions

Word Work: Producers

What Have We Already Learned?

Review with students what was learned in the previous read-aloud. You

may wish to ask the following questions:

• What do we call the field of science that studies the households of

animals and plants? (ecology) What is an ecologist? (a person who

studies ecology)

• What is a habitat? (an animal’s home that provides food, water,

shelter, and space)

• What is an ecosystem? (a community of living and nonliving things

interacting and living in multiple habitats)

• [Show Image Cards 1–5 and review the types of ecosystems.] What

are some habitats within these ecosystems? What types of animals

are well adapted to live in these ecosystems?

What Do We Know?

Tell students that the title of today’s read-aloud is “Food Chains, Part I.”

Ask students, “Who can share what a food chain is?” (a relationship of

living things as food sources for other living things) Draw a simple food

chain on chart paper, a chalkboard, or a whiteboard, such as wheat >

mouse > cat. Explain that first the wheat is a food source for the mouse,

and then the mouse is a food source for the cat. Ask students to provide

one or two of their own simple food chains.

Making Predictions About the Read-Aloud

Remind students that at the end of the last read-aloud, Zeke the

ecologist asked them to think about how they are connected to an ant

or a bee. Tell students that they will find out whether their predictions are

correct after the read-aloud.

 

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS

1. Evaluative Were your predictions about how you might be

connected to an ant or a bee correct? Why or why not? (Answers

may vary; guide students in providing simple food chains

demonstrating how they could be connected to these two insects,

e.g., plant>ant>fish>human; flower>nectar>bee>bird>human;

flower>nectar>bee>honey>human)

2. Today you heard that organisms in an ecosystem are

interdependent. What does it mean for things to be interdependent?

(They depend on each other for their survival.) What things might a

mouse be dependent on in its ecosystem? (grains, nuts, etc.) What

animal might be dependent on mice for food? (owls, wild cats, etc.)

§§ Show image 2A-9: Caterpillar food chain

3. How would you describe this illustration? (It’s an

ecosystem in which a food chain has formed among the leaf, the

caterpillar, the small bird, the large bird, and the decomposers.) What

is a food chain? (a relationship of living things as food sources for

other living things)

4. What are trophic levels? (connecting steps in a food chain)

What is the smallest number of trophic levels in a food chain? (two)

What is an example of a food chain with at least three living things?

(Answers may vary.)

5. What are three essential parts of a food chain? What

does each of these parts do? (Producers make their own food

and nutrients through photosynthesis; consumers eat other plants

and animals for food and nutrients; decomposers break down

dead plants and animals.) Why do we say producers, consumers,

and decomposers operate in a circular fashion? (First, energy is

transferred from a producer to a consumer, then to another consumer,

and finally back again to the soil where the decomposers break it

down and help new producers grow.)

6. What is a food web? (complex, interconnected network of

food chains)

7. Evaluative How are food chains, food webs, human body systems,

and road systems similar? What two words can be used to describe

them? (They are all interconnected networks.)

8. Inferential Algae is one example of a producer; what are two more

examples? (moss, trees, plants, lichen, grasses, etc.) What is an

example of a consumer, and a decomposer? (Answers may vary,

but may include examples from the read-aloud such as a mouse,

boar, and wolf for consumer and worms, slugs, snails, beetles, other

insects, fungi, and microscopic bacteria for decomposers.)

9. What are the three types of consumers? (herbivores, carnivores, and

omnivores) Compare and contrast these three types of consumers.

(compare—living organisms, animals, need food to live, etc.;

contrast—herbivores mainly eat producers, whereas carnivores and

omnivores eat other consumers; etc.)

I am going to ask you a question. I will give you a minute to think about

the question, and then I will ask you to turn to your neighbor and discuss

the question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you

discussed with your partner.

10. Think Pair Share: Are you a producer, consumer,

or decomposer? How do you know? (We are consumers; humans

cannot make our own food through photosynthesis as plants do; we

eat plants and/or animals for food.)
11:45-12:15                                      RECESS
12:15-1:00                                       LUNCH
1:00- 2:00                                  CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9 LESSON 14
Reading Time Small Group: Remediation and

Enrichment

The Age of Exploration; More

Classic Tales

Grammar Introduce Irregular Comparative

and Superlative Adjectives Worksheet 14.1

Advance Preparation

Display the comparative and superlative adjectives poster:

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparative adjectives compare two nouns to show that one is

greater or more. The suffix –er is added to adjectives.

Superlative adjectives compare more than two nouns to show that

one is greatest or most. The suffix –est is added to adjectives.

Instead of the suffixes –er and –est, use the words more and most

when forming comparative and superlative adjectives that end with

the suffixes –ful, –less, –ing, –ed, –ous or that have three or more

syllables.

99 Form and use comparative and superlative

adjectives (

Small Group: Remediation and Enrichment

• When having students work in small groups, please remember to

choose activities that fit students’ needs at the time.

›. Small Group 1: Work with these students on any weak areas

that were exhibited on the assessment. You may wish to use the

Assessment and Remediation Guide and/or worksheets found in the

Pausing Point with these students.

›. Small Group 2: Ask these students to read a chapter or two of their

choice from The Age of Exploration or More Classic Tales.

Introduce Irregular Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Worksheet 14.1

 

Instruction on comparative and superlative adjectives continues in the

next unit.

• Direct students’ attention to the comparative and superlative

adjectives poster you displayed in advance and review it with them.

• Remind students that the suffixes –er and –est are added to

adjectives to show comparison.

• Remind students that the words more or most are added to some

adjectives to show comparison.
2:00-2:50                                      MATH/READING- Small group

 

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions  (READING A TO Z BOOK )Remind students that they have learned two parts of speech—nouns and

verbs—and review them.
3:00 Dismissal                      Classroom Clean up
Wednesday April 26th , 2017

8:00-8:45                                          MATH

Math/ Adding and Subtracting Compound Units

Objectives: Find the duration of a time interval without using a clock face.

Find the end time when given the start time and the time interval.

Find the start time when given the end time and the time interval.

Add or subtract time in compound units.

Write on board as shown on right. Ask students how many minutes to the next hour it is. Tell students that they can count by 5 min. 3:40 to 3:45 is the 1st 5 min; 3:45 to 3:50 is the 2nd 5 min; 3:50 to 3:55 is the 3rd 5 min; 3:55 to 4:00 is the 4th 5 min. Tell students that they may want to use their fingers to help them remember the numbers of five min intervals when they move from one time to the other. Tell students that as there are four 5 min intervals, so it is a total of 20 min. Write on board as shown on right. Ask students how many minutes to the next hour 3:42. What is the next hour? Tell students that the next hour is 4:00. Write on the board as shown on the right. Tell students that it’s easier to count by tens and ones in this case.

Assess: Have students do tasks 14-18, TB p. 118-119

Practice: WB Exercise 5,p. 131-132

Objectives: Practice finding duration

Practice adding and subtracting time.

Practice solving word problems involving addition and subtraction of time.
Have students do Practice A, TB p.120

Call on some students to explain how they solved the problems. Provide any reteaching of concepts that may be necessary.
Extra Practice: Exercise 1A and 1B,p. 197-204

Tests: Test 1A and 1B,p. 201-208 MATH/Months and Years

Objectives: Convert between years and months in compound units

Materials: Calendar, The day’s newspaper
Teaching Strategies: Show students a calendar. Ask students how many months]

there are in a year. What are they called? How many days are in  a year? Tell students that there are 12 months in a year. Jan, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, June, Jul, August, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec. there are 365 day in a year.

Write on board 1 yr =12 months Ask students how many months there are in 2 years, 3 yr and 4 years. As your students supply you with the answer, note it down on the board. Tell students that they can multiply the years by 12 to get the number of months. It is actually the multiplication facts by 12. They can count by 12 by adding one ten and two ones.

Ask students how many months are in 4 years 6 months. Write on board 4 yr 6 mon=?

Tell students that they should multiply the years by 12 months, and then add the months. 4 times 12 is 48, add it to 6, they will get 54 months.

Assess: Have students do task 4, TBp. 123
9:50- 10:30                              CKLA EXTENSIONS

Producer, Consumer, Decomposer Sort

Display Image Cards 6–29. Guide students in sorting the cards into

groups of producers, consumers, and decomposers.

You may choose to have students further classify the consumers into

herbivores, carnivores, and omnivores.

Food Chain Graphic Organizer (Instructional Master 2B-1)

Note: Show students images 2A-6, 2A-7, and/or 2A-8 as they

participate in this extension.

Have students look at Instructional Master 2B-1. Explain that they will

write a sentence about how each part of the food chain receives food and

nutrients. Remind students to write in complete sentences. Guide students

to use temporal words such as first, next, then, and finally to describe

the food chain cycle. Hear is one possible response: “First, the producer

makes its own food through the process of photosynthesis. Next, the first

consumer eats the producer. Then, another consumer eats that consumer.

Finally, the decomposer(s) eat the consumer and transfer energy back to

the ground (producer).” Students will also write one sentence providing an

example of a producer, a consumer, and a decomposer.

On the back of the page, students should draw a food chain with at least

three trophic levels—one producer, one consumer, and one decomposer.

Encourage students to try to include two consumers. Ask students

to draw arrows to demonstrate the circular nature of the food chain.

Encourage students to reference Image Cards 6–29 which were used

in the previous sorting activity, to help them formulate their answers.

Allow students to share their drawings and sentences as time permits,

encouraging the use of domain vocabulary and temporal language

10:30- 11:00                             COMPASS LEARNING
11:00- 11:45                                     CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 LESSON 3
Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned?

Essential Background

Information or Terms

chart paper, chalkboard, or

whiteboard

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Food Chains, Part II Image Card 29 20

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions

Word Work: Tier

What Have We Already Learned?

Review with students what they have already learned about food chains.

You may wish to guide the discussion by asking the following questions:

• What is an ecosystem? (a community of living organisms, including

plants and animals, all interacting with one another and their physical

environments)

• What is a habitat? (a home within an ecosystem)

• What are trophic levels? (connecting steps in a food chain) At least

how many trophic levels exist in a food chain? (two)

§§ Show image 2A-8: Full cycle completed

• In this illustration, which organism is a producer? (the berry bush)

How does a producer get its food? (makes its own food through

photosynthesis) In this illustration, which organisms are the consumers?

(the boar, mouse, and wolf) How does a consumer get its food? (eats

other plants and/or animals) In this illustration, which organisms are

the decomposers? (worms, snail, and beetle) What is the role of a

decomposer in a food chain? (breaks down dead plants and animals)

Remind students that at the end of the last read-aloud, Zeke asked them

to look for food chains in their neighborhood. Ask students to share any

food chains they identified. Encourage students to identify the parts of

their food chains as a consumer, producer, or decomposer.

Essential Background Information or Terms

Tell students that today they will be looking at different ways that we

organize information about feeding relationships in nature. Tell students

that when we have a lot of information on one topic, it is helpful to

organize that information on paper in certain ways. Tell students that

there is more than one way they can organize information on paper. Ask

students, “How did we organize all the information we learned about

the classification of animals?” (in a chart) When the information was in a chart, students could then see possible patterns and differences among

the various classifications of animals. Review with students other visual

ways they have organized information before, such as KWL (Know-

Wonder-Learn) charts, T-charts, Venn diagrams, the Native Americans

Regions and Cultures Organizer, brainstorming links, etc.

Ask students, “What is one way that you have already seen the feeding

relationships in ecosystems organized?” (food chain) Remind students

that at the end of the last lesson, they heard that they will learn more

about food webs, which are overlapping food chains. Tell students that

they will see one additional way to organize information about the feeding

relationships in ecosystems: an energy pyramid. Tell students that the

energy pyramid shows the trophic levels (feeding levels) in a food chain. It

also illustrates the amount of energy available to the different organisms.

Draw a simple pyramid on chart paper or on the board and ask students,

“Which part of a pyramid is the widest, the base or the top?” (base)

Producers, organisms that have the most energy, are shown at the base

of the pyramid. Remind students that with sunshine and water, producers

are able to make their own food, so they have the most energy available

for themselves.

Tell students that they will hear about these three types of organizers

today: energy pyramids, food chains, and food webs. All three of these

things help us to understand and view patterns of feeding relationships

within an ecosystem.

Note: If your students learned about the former food pyramid, you

may wish to discuss this graphic organizer with them in order to

compare the two organizers. Explain that the food pyramid was once

used to show how much of each type of food (grains, dairy, fruits,

vegetables, meats, fats, and sugars) a person should eat each day.

At the widest point of the food pyramid, there were grains, meaning

it was recommended that people have more grains than the other

foods each day. Sugar, in contrast, was at the top, meaning that sugar

was what people should have the least of each day. Tell students that

the food pyramid is very different from the energy pyramid, but that

they will soon see why a pyramid is an effective tool to show different

amounts of energy.

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully to learn more about food chains, food

webs, and energy pyramids.

Comprehension Questions

1. Inferential What is an ecosystem? (a community of plants and animals,

all interacting with one another and their physical environments) What

specific ecosystems did you hear about today in the read-aloud?

(Sonoran Desert, Florida Everglades, Amazon Rainforest)

2. Inferential What is a habitat? (an animal’s home in an ecosystem)

What is an example of a habitat that you saw today in the read-aloud?

(Answers may vary; you may wish to show students an image from

the read-aloud to help them identify a habitat, such as a tree, rock,

seabed, etc.)

3. Evaluative You heard in the read-aloud that in different ecosystems

there is diverse plant and animal life. Explain how this diversity

impacts the variety of food chain possibilities. (This diversity creates a

greater number of possibilities of energy interactions.)

4. l What happens in a food chain? (One living thing serves

as a food source for another living thing.)

5. Inferential How would you describe a food web? (multiple,

interconnected food chains that overlap and form complicated

patterns)

6. You heard in the read-aloud about the energy pyramid.

First, explain on which tier each group is placed. Then describe how

the pyramid shows the amount of energy within the producers and

consumers. (Producers are on the bottom; consumers are on the

second and third tiers. The widest tier at the bottom shows the most

energy; the narrowest tier at the top shows the least energy.)

Show image 3A-6: Sonoran Desert food web

7. In this food web of the Sonoran Desert, who can

identify one food chain? (Answers may vary; refer to the section

under image 3A-5 for possible food chains, such as plant>ant>

scorpion>rat>hawk>beetles/fungi>soil>new producers.) Which

organism is a producer? A consumer? A decomposer? (producers:

cacti and shrubs; consumers: ant, rat, turtle, scorpion, lizard, birds,

snake, kit fox, coyote, etc; scavenger: vulture; decomposers: beetle,

other insects, fungi, bacteria)

11:45-12:15                                      RECESS
12:15-1:00                                       LUNCH
1:00- 2:00                                  CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9 LESSON 15

Spelling Spelling Assessment Worksheet 15.1; optional pens 25

Reading Time Small Group: Remediation and

Enrichment

The Age of Exploration; More

Classic Tales

Spelling Assessment

Worksheet 15.1

• Have students turn to Worksheet 15.1 for the spelling assessment.

• If you would like for students to have pens, this is the time to pass

them out.

• Tell students that for this assessment, they will write the words under

the header to which they belong. For example, if you call out the word

famous they would write that word under the header ‘f’ > /f/.

• Tell students that they may not have to use all the lines under each

header. Using the chart below, call out the words using the following format:

say the word, use it in a sentence, and say the word once more.

1. elephant

2. phases

3. fairest

4. laughing

5. trophy

6. tougher

7. giraffe

8. phony

9. spherical

10. roughly

11. fare

12. stuffing

13. funnel

14. identify

15. affect

16. phrase

17. enough

18. Challenge Word: probably

19. Challenge Word: weather

20. Challenge Word: whether

Content Word: expedition

Small Group: Remediation and Enrichment

When having students work in small groups, please remember to choose

activities that fit the needs of your students at the time.

›. Small Group 1: Work with these students on any weak areas

that were exhibited on the assessment. You may wish to use the

Assessment and Remediation Guide and/or worksheets found in the

Pausing Point with these students.

›. Small Group 2: Ask these students to read a chapter or two of their

choice from The Age of Exploration or More Classic Tales.

2:00-2:50                                      MATH/READING- Small group

 

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions  (READING A TO Z BOOK )Remind students that they have learned two parts of speech—nouns and

verbs—and review them. (A noun names a person, place, or thing. A verb can

show action.)

3:00 Dismissal                      Classroom Clean up
Thursday April 27th,, 2017

8:00- 8:45                                             ART

8:50 -9:50                                           MATH
Practice B

Objectives: Practice converting between hours, minutes, seconds, years, months, weeks, and days

Practice solving word problems involving addition and subtraction of time.
Teaching Strategies:

Practice: Have students do Practice B, TB p. 124

Call on students to explain how they solved the problems. Provide any reteaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Extra Practice: Exercise 2,.p. 205-206

Tests: 2A and 2B,.p. 209-214

Review 11

Objectives: Review concepts learned in Units 1-11

Materials: Cards with years and months and corresponding number of months and likewise for weeks and days

Teaching Strategies:  Review: Have students do Review 11, TB p. 125-126

You can do this as a class having students do the problems one at a time on individual marker boards and sharing their answers. Provide any reteaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Activity: Version 1 Convert between years and months.
Use 10-20 pair of cards for each group, one card in each pair with the years and months and the other with the corresponding number of months.

Version 2: Convert between weeks and days. Use 10-20 pairs of cards for each group, one card in each pair with the weeks and days and the other with the corresponding number of days.

Material for each group: 10-20 pairs of cards as described above.

Procedure: Cards are shuffled, placed face down in the middle, and the first one turned over. Students take turns turning over the next card and trying to match it with a faceup card. If there is n o match, they leave it face up on the table.

Problem Solving: Give students copies of Appendix 11.ry or in small groups. Discuss their solutions.

Practice: WB Review 11, p. 141-145.

Tests: Units 1-11, Cumulative Tests A and B,. p. 215-226

 
9:50- 10:30                                   CKLA EXTENIONS

Image Review

Show images 3A-6, 3A-10, and 3A-14 from the read-aloud again, and

have students review possible food webs in these different ecosystems,

just as they did in the read-aloud. Encourage students to use domainrelated

vocabulary such as trophic levels, energy pyramid, food web,

food chain, producer, consumer, decomposer, etc, as well as temporal

words such as first, next, then, and finally.

As time permits, you may also wish to show additional images from the

read-aloud and have students retell key facts from the read-aloud using

the images. Discuss with students the ecosystems shown, and how

each organism is suited to live in the particular environment. You may

also discuss how the nonliving elements, such as rocks, soil, and rainfall,

influence the lives of these organisms.

Create a Food Chain and Web

Show image 3A-4: Sonoran Desert energy pyramid

Tell students that with a partner, they will create a food web based on

the organisms shown in this energy pyramid. Review the names of the

producers, consumers, and decomposers shown. On their own pieces

of paper, each student will work individually and sequence a food chain

of at least three trophic levels. After they have completed their own food

chains, students should compare theirs with their partner’s food chain

to see how the chains may overlap to create a food web. Have students

decide on and make a shared food web, underlining the producers in

green, the consumers in red, and the decomposers in brown. If time

permits, students may illustrate their food webs.

10:30-11:00                           COMPASS LEARNING
11:00-11:45                               CKLA/LL DOMAIN 11 LESSON 4
Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned?

Making Predictions About the

Read-Aloud

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Balance of Nature Image Card 30 20

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions

Word Work: Static

What Have We Already Learned?

Review with students the information about eating and energy patterns

in ecosystems. You may wish to guide the discussion by showing the

following images and asking the following questions:

§§ Show image 3A-14: Amazon Rainforest food web

• What is a food web? (multiple food chains that overlap and form

complicated patterns)

• What are some examples of food chains within this food web?

§§ Show image 3A-2: Energy pyramid

• What are trophic levels? (connecting steps in a food chain or food

web)

• On the energy pyramid, which group has the most energy?

(producers) Which groups have less energy? (consumers) Explain

why.

Making Predictions About the Read-Aloud

Remind students that at the end of the last read-aloud, Zeke told them

that they would learn about changes in ecosystems. Tell students that the

title of today’s read-aloud is “Balance of Nature.” Ask students to predict

why it would be important to have balance in nature and what problems

may occur if there is not a balance in nature.

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully to learn more about the balance of nature

and to find out if their predictions are correct.

 

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS

1. Evaluative Were your predictions correct about why balance in nature

is important and what problems could occur if there is not balance?

Why or why not? (Answers may vary.)

2. Evaluative What does it mean if something is static? (It does not

change.) Are ecosystems and nature static? Why or why not? (No,

animals and plants adapt in response to their environments.)

3. How does the phrase “balance of nature” explain the

natural events that occur in ecosystems? (It means one stable, or

firmly established, condition changes gradually into another stable

condition with very few disruptions to nature’s cycles.)

4. Inferential What are some examples of natural events or cycles that

cause changes in an ecosystem? (living cycles such as the seasons;

nonliving cycles such as the water cycle and the rock-forming cycle)

5. For an ecosystem to maintain equilibrium and for one

stable condition to turn into another stable condition, which is better:

a gradual change or a sudden change? Why? (Gradual changes are

better because they allow ecosystems time to adapt for survival.)

6 Evaluative You heard that in some areas overpopulation has

become a serious problem with the white-tail deer species. When

they leave the woods and go foraging in gardens, some humans can

become very upset. How did this disequilibrium occur? (Humans

killed the natural enemies of deer and changed their habitats through

logging and building homes.) Was the change in the deer population

caused by a natural or human event? (human)

7 Compare and contrast natural and human disruptions

to the balance of nature. (Examples of natural disruptions would be

change of seasons, change of animal populations, and change of

food availability; humans have no control over these. Examples of

human disruptions would be the farmer shooting predators such as

hawks or coyotes or building too many homes in animal habitats;

humans can control these kinds of disruptions.)
nce

A.

At a Glance Exercise Materials
11:45-12:15                                        RECESS
12   12:15 – 1:00                                       LUNCH

12:  1:00 – 2:00                                   CKLA SKILL UNIT 9  PAUSING POINT
Linking Words in conclusion

• Worksheet PP1

• Add sentences to the end of paragraphs, correctly using the linking

words in conclusion

Build Sentences with Linking Words for example

• Worksheet PP2

• Build sentences by adding adjectives and adverbs and using the

linking words for example

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

• Worksheet PP3

• Write the correct comparative or superlative adjectives in sentences

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Using more and most

• Worksheet PP4

• Write the correct comparative or superlative adjectives in sentences

Irregular Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

• Worksheet PP5

• Write the correct comparative or superlative adjectives in sentences

Morphology

Prefixes pro– and anti–

• Worksheet PP6

• Choose the correct affixed word to complete the sentence; write

sentences using affixed words

Suffix Review: –ish, –ness, –able, and –ible

• Worksheet PP7

• Choose from the root word and affixed word to complete the

sentence; identify the part of speech, root word, and meaning of

affixed words

Prefix Review: pro– and anti–

• Worksheet PP8

• Determine if the sentence demonstrates the meaning of the affixed

word; write sentences that demonstrate the meaning of the affixed

words

rcise Materials Minute

2:00-2:50                                MATH/READING- Small group

 

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions  (READING A TO Z BOOK )
3:00  Dismissal                    Classroom Clean up

Friday April 28th , 2017

8:00-8:45                                   MUSIC/DRAMA

P
8:50-9:50                                  MATH

Math Review

Word Problem Review: Objectives: Review concepts learned in Unit 4

Teaching Strategies: Have students do Review 4, TB p. 137-139

This review can be done in class. Have students do the problems one at a time on individual marker board or paper and share their answer. Provide re-teaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Practice Problem Solving: WB Review 4,p. 155-161

Tests: Units 1-4, Cumulative Tests A and B,p. 183-194

REVIEW

Adding And Subtracting Pounds and Ounces in Compound Units

Objectives: Add or subtract pounds and ounces in compound units

Materials: Appendix 7.3b

Teaching Strategies: Write on board 11 oz + 8 oz=

Ask students how to solve this problem. Tell students that they can add the ounces and then convert to pounds and ounces. Write on the board as shown on the right. Tell students that they can also make a 16 (1pound), taking ounces from one of the numbers of ounces to make 16 with the other number. The remainder is the number in ounces. Tell students that in this example,7 they should take 5 ounces from the 8 ounces to make 16 with the 11 ounces and 8 ounces is 1 pound 3 ounces.
Write on board “3lb 9oz +1lb 14 oz= ____lb____oz

Ask students what strategies they can use to solve this problem here. Tell students that they can add the pounds first, and then add the ounces using strategies already learned.

Have students supply the answer for the task 10(a), Textbook p. 44
Write on board “3lb 5oz-9oz=___lb___oz

Tell students that they can rename one of the pounds as 16 ounces, add that to the 5 ounces giving them 21 ounces and then subtract 9ounces from 21 ounces giving them 12 ounces. Write this on the board.

Tell the students that alternatively, they can rename one of the pounds as 16 oz, subtract 9 oz from it, and add the difference to the remaining pounds and ounces.

Write on board 3lb 9oz-1lb 14oz=___lb___oz Ask students how to solve this problem. Tell students that they can subtract the pounds first, then the ounces, using strategies they have already learned. They can also write these problems vertical,

Have students look at task 13, TB p.45 Aid discussion using the following questions:

-What do they need to find? (Weight of squash)

-What do they know? (Weight of tomato and weight of avocado which is 4 oz more than tomato)

-What else do they know? ( Weight of squash is 2 times that of avocado)

-What model do they use? (Comparison /model)

-How many bars do they draw? (3 bars)

-What is the relative size of each bar?(Tomato is shortest. Avocado is slightly more than 2 times of tomato. Squash is 2 times avocado)

-How do they find the value of the missing part? (Add 3oz and 4 oz together, then multiply by 2)

-What is the answer? (14oz)

Assess: Have students do task 11, 12 and 14, TB p. 45

Practice:WB 6, p. 42-43

9:50 – 10:30                             CKLA EXTENIONS
What Would Happen? (Instructional Master 4B-1)

Read the writing prompt on Instructional Master 4B-1 with students:

Imagine a place where deer and wolves live together in a wooded

ecosystem. The wolves sometimes leave the woods and kill sheep for

food on nearby farms. Some farmers get mad at the wolves, so they

trap and shoot them in large numbers. What do you think will now

happen to this ecosystem? How might the balance of nature change?

You may wish to have students work with a partner to discuss the

question before they being to write their individual responses. Encourage

students to use domain-related vocabulary. If time permits, allow

students to share their responses with the class.

10:30-11:00                             COMPASS LEARNING
11:00-11:45                 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 11 PAUSING POINT 1
Core Content Up to This Pausing Point

Students will:

Describe ecology as the study of relationships between living things

and their environment

Describe and provide an example of a habitat

Explain why certain organisms live in certain habitats and how they

adapt to those habitats

Describe and provide an example of an ecosystem

Describe how organisms in an ecosystem depend on each other and

their environment

Describe what happens in a food chain

Identify the three essential parts of a food chain: producers,

consumers, and decomposers

Sequence a food chain of two or more trophic levels

Classify members of a food chain as producers, consumers, or

decomposers

Provide an example of a food chain in a given food web

Explain why nature and ecosystems are not static but are constantly

changing . Describe the balance of nature in an ecosystem

99 Explain how changes in an ecosystem are caused by natural events

and by humans

Image Review

Show the images from any read-aloud again, and have students retell the

read-aloud using the images.

Image Card Review

Materials: Image Cards 1–29

Hold up Image Cards 1–29. Ask a student to choose a card but not show

it to anyone else in the class. The student must then give clues about the

picture s/he is holding. With each clue, allow for one guess from the rest

of the students. Guide students to choose a particular ecosystem or a

producer/consumer if needed. Encourage students to use domain-related

vocabulary as they give clues and guesses.

Domain-Related Trade Book or Student Choice

Materials: Trade book; chart paper, chalkboard, or whiteboard

Read an additional trade book to review concepts such as ecosystems,

biomes, food chains, food webs, or the balance of nature. Refer to the

books listed in the domain introduction. You may also choose to have the

students select a read-aloud to be heard again.

If students listen to a read-aloud a second time, you may wish to have

them take notes and create an outline to summarize the main idea of

a particular topic in the trade book or read-aloud. Be sure to guide

students in this important method of gathering information. Key Vocabulary Brainstorming

Materials: Chart paper, chalkboard, or whiteboard

Give students a key domain concept or vocabulary word such as

biomes, food chain, or food web. Have them brainstorm everything that

comes to mind when they hear the word, such as rainforests, producers,

consumers, interconnected, etc. Record their responses on a piece of

chart paper, a chalkboard, or a whiteboard for reference.

Multiple Meaning Word Activity: Stable

Materials: Chart paper, chalkboard, or whiteboard; newspaper or

magazine; drawing paper, drawing tools

Display the following definitions of the word stable on a piece of chart

paper, a chalkboard, or a whiteboard. Read each definition to students.

• “A” – not likely to change or move

• “B” – steady emotionally or in personality

• “C” – a building where animals are lodged and fed

• “D” – a group of people or animals under one manager

Students may refer to the letters in their answers, read the definition, or

walk up to the definitions and point to the one that shows the use of the

word you are describing

11:45-12:15                                   RECESS
12:15-1:00                                       LUNCH

1:00 – 2:00                          CKLA SKILLS UNIT 10 LESSON 1

Reading Time

Whole Group: “Introduction to

Living in Colonial America” and

“The First English Colony”

Living in Colonial America;

Vocabulary Cards;

Worksheet 1.1; optional world

map or globe

Spelling Introduce Spelling Words Individual Code Chart;

Worksheet 1.2

Take-Home Material

Family Letter; “Introduction to

Living in Colonial America”; ”The

First English Colony”; Glossary

for Living in Colonial America

Worksheets 1.2–1.4, PP8

Advance Preparation

If you wish, you may draw the following spelling table on the board or

chart paper before beginning this lesson.

/ə/ /ə/ + /l/ /sh/ + /ə/ + /n/ /ue/ /oo/ /f/

During this week, students will review the last five weeks’ spelling

patterns. This includes spelling patterns with /ə/, /ə/ + /l/, /sh/ + /ə/ + /n/,

/ ue/, /oo/, and /f/. Students should be familiar with these spellings as they

were taught in Grade 2 Whole Group: “Introduction to Living in Colonial America”

and “The First English Colony”

Chapter 1

Worksheet 1.1

Introducing the Reader

• Make sure that each student has a copy of the Reader, Living in

Colonial America.

• Read the title of the Reader with students and tell students that

this Reader is historical fiction. Historical fiction has two important

features: the stories and characters are made up but the times and

places were real.

• Have students turn to the Table of Contents.

• Either read several titles from the Table of Contents aloud to students or

have students read them.

• Give students a few moments to flip through the Reader and

comment on the images they see.

• Ask students if they have any predictions about the Reader.

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that the titles of today’s chapters are “Introduction to

Living in Colonial America” and “The First English Colony.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the Introduction,

and then turn to the first page of the Introduction.

Previewing the Vocabulary

• As in previous units, we recommend the use of the provided

Vocabulary Cards. Preview specific Vocabulary Cards immediately

before students are asked to read the page(s) on which they appear.

The page number where the word first appears in “Introduction to Living in Colonial America” and “The First English Colony” is listed

in bold print after the definition. A word in parentheses after the

definition is another form of the vocabulary word that appears in the

chapter. An asterisk after a word indicates the word is also taught in

Listening & Learning.

Wrap-Up

• Reread the questions in the box at the end of page 22 and have

students make predictions.

• Tell students that these questions may be ones that Time Travelers

might ask.

• Tell students to use information and specific details from the chapter

to support their answers.

• Help students look back through the chapter to find sentences that

support their predictions.

Discussion Question on “The First English Colony”

1. Evaluative Do you think the settlers survived? Does the colony

survive? Does Roanoke Island become the first successful

English colony in North America? (Answers may vary but could

include that Sir Walter Raleigh was very determined to succeed

so he would likely do everything possible to help the settlers

survive. Students may also remember that this was a second

attempt to set up a colony as the first was not successful.

Students may wonder what happened to the rest of the first

settlers after hearing of a skeleton being found. Finally, students

may wonder if John White would return in time with food since

they had arrived too late to plant crops.) Introduce Spelling Words

Worksheet 1.2

For additional

practice, see

worksheets in

Sections III-B, IV-H,

IV-I, VI-B, and VII-B

of the Assessment

and Remediation

Guide.

• Tell students that this week, they will review the spellings from the last

five weeks, which include /ə/, /ə/ + /l/, /sh/ + /ə/ + /n/, /ue/, /oo/, and

/f/. As you introduce each of the spelling words, write it on the board,

pronouncing each word as you write it. Briefly explain any word for

which students may not know the meaning and use it in a sentence.

1. movement

2. spherical

3. accuse

4. sentence

5. toothache

6. continue

7. hospital

8. affect

9. occupy

10. whoever

11. addition

12. identify

13. ability

14. shrewd

15. secure

16. vowel

17. tougher

18. wobble

19. Challenge Word: beautiful

20. Challenge Word: definite

Content Word: Powhatan

Family Letter; “Introduction to Living in Colonial America”; ”The

First English Colony”; Glossary for Living in Colonial America

• Have students take home Worksheet 1.2 to share with a family

member, Worksheets 1.3 and 1.4 to read to a family member, and

Worksheet PP8 to use as a reference during this unit.

 
2:00-2:50                                     MATH/READING- Small group
Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions  (READING A TO Z BOOK )
3:00 Dismissal                         Classroom Clean up