LESSON PLANS APRIL 3RD-7TH ,2017

Monday April 3rd -7th ,2017

8:00-8:45 Specials PE

8:50-9:50 MATH

MATH/ Adding and Subtracting Meters and Centimeters in Compound Units

Objectives: Add and subtract meters and centimeters in compound units.

Teaching strategies: Write in the board ‘2 m 60 cm + 25 cm= Ask students how they get the answer. Tell students that since there are no meters in front of 25 cm, they can just add the centimeters. The sum of 60 cm and 25 cm is 85 cm. Write on the board ‘2 m 60 cm +25 – 2 m 85 cm’

Assess: Have students do tasks 14-15, TB p.12

Practice: Exercise 1,p. 113-114

Extra Practice: 1, p. 113-114

Tests: 1A and 1B,p. 1-6

6.2 Introduction to Kilometers

Objectives: Understand the kilometer as a unit of measurement. Convert a measurement in kilometers and meters and vice versa

Materials: Map of buildings around school, Map of cities closest to school

Teaching Strategies: Have students look at TB p.13. Bring to their attention that a bus is about 10 m long. Tell students to imagine 10 meter sticks lying end to end. Say that the total length of the stick is 10 m. Tell students that to get 1 kilometer, imagine 100 such buses parked front to end. Or, they can imagine 1000 meter sticks placed end to end. A kilometer is little more than half a mile. Write “ on the board” 1 km=1000 m

Use a familiar landmark near the school that is about 1 km away. Draw a roughly scaled map on the board showing the school the landmark and indicate the distance of 1 km . Using the map or list, ask students how far it is to ___ from_______ in meters. Tell students that sometimes they may get mixed up between centimeters and kilometers. Here’s a way to help them remember. The prefix centi means ‘a hundred. For an example, a centipede has 100 legs. There are 100 cents in a dollar. 100 centimeters= 1 meter. The prefix ‘kilo-’ means thousand. 1 kilometer= 1000 meters.

Assess: Have students do tasks 1-6, TB p. 14-15

Practice: WB Exercise 4,p. 11-14

Word Problems / Practice B

Objectives : Solve word problems involving the subtraction of money.

Practice adding and subtracting money.

Practice word problems involving addition and subtraction of money

Teaching Strategies: Have student work on tasks 10 and 11 on their own before discussing their answer. You can also call upon a student to present the solution.

Call some students to explain how they solved the problems and if their answers are reasonable. Provide any reteaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Practice: Workbook Exercise 5, p.77-80, Exercise 3, p. 159-162

9:50- 10:30 CKLA EXTENSIONS

Riddles for Core Content

Ask students riddles such as the following to review core content:

• I am the location known as the “Lost Colony,” where the English tried

to establish the first colony in North America, although both attempts

failed. What am I? (Roanoke Island)

• We are two Englishmen who attempted to settle on Roanoke Island.

Who are we? (Sir Walter Raleigh and John White)

• We are the three colonial regions that each have unique geography,

climate, industries, and cultures. What are we? (New England, Middle

Atlantic, Southern) We are the three ships on which the English sailed to America to

start the first permanent English colony. What are we? (the Discovery,

Susan Constant, and Godspeed) Which one of us means “Good

Luck”? (Godspeed)

• I am the king who chartered the colony of Jamestown. Who am I?

(King James I)

• We are the Native American chiefdom that was living in the area the

English called Jamestown. Who are we? (the Powhatan)

• I didn’t beat around the bush, but instead came up with a plan to help

save Jamestown. Who am I? (John Smith)

• My passage to North America was paid for by someone else, and

now I must work for them for seven years. What am I? (an indentured

servant)

• I was forced to come to North America from Africa to work for free

and denied the freedom to decide how to live my life. What am I? (an

enslaved African)

• We are the three cash crops grown in the Southern colonies. What

are we? (rice, tobacco, indigo)

Venn Diagram

Materials: Instructional Master PP1-1; chart paper, chalkboard, or

whiteboard

Tell students that together you are going to compare and contrast two

things or people they have learned about during Colonial America by

asking how they are similar and how they are different.

Copy Instructional Master PP1-1 onto chart paper, a chalkboard, or a

whiteboard. List two things at the top of the diagram, and then capture

information provided by students. Choose from the following list, or

create a pair of your own:

• the Southern and New England regions

• Roanoke and Jamestown

• Virginia and the Carolinas

• Maryland and Georgia

• indentured servants and enslaved laborers

• tobacco and indigo Pilgrims and Puritans

• the baptism of Virginia Dare and the first Thanksgiving

• Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson

• the Powhatan and the Wampanoag

Writing Prompts

Students may be given an additional writing prompt such as the

following:

• The most interesting thing I’ve learned thus far is because . . .

• If I could choose to live in one of the Southern or New England

colonies, I would choose because . . .

• The saying “beat around the bush” relates to John Smith and the

Jamestown colony because . . .

• The saying “beggars can’t be choosers” relates to British debtors and

the colony of Georgia because . . .Colony Travel Brochure

Materials: Drawing paper, drawing tools

Have students choose a colony and write a travel brochure to describe it.

Have students include information about the geography, climate, foliage,

activities, industries, sights to see, etc. Encourage students to be as

descriptive as possible, and to remember that the purpose of a travel

brochure is to entice visitors to come experience a place for themselves.

Have students add a descriptive illustration to their brochure.

Rereading and Retelling the Read-Aloud

Materials: Index cards

Reread excerpts from the read-aloud in Lesson 7, “Religious Dissent and

the New England Colonies.” Have students retell the read-aloud from the

point of view of three key people: John Winthrop, Roger Williams, and

Anne Hutchinson. Place students in three groups to discuss the following

about each key person:

• Why did this person come to the “New World”?

• To which colony did s/he go?

• What happened in his/her life?

• What contributions did s/he make?

10:30-11:00 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00 -11:45 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 LESSON 8

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned?

Timeline of the Americas;

Poster 1 (Regional Map of

Colonial America)

Where Are We? Poster 1;

any Image Card

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud The Middle Colonies Poster 1; Poster 2 (Royal

Portrait Gallery)

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Image Cards 16, 17;

Timeline of the Americas

Word Work: Dependence

What Have We Already Learned?

Review the information covered thus far on the Timeline of the Americas,

highlighting the sequence of events. Briefly review with students the

information they heard in previous read-alouds. To guide the review, you

may wish to use images from the read-alouds

Where Are We?

Ask students to point to the region they have not yet learned about.

(Middle colonies) Ask students to name any colonies they can that

are in the Middle Atlantic region. Point out any they missed, so that all

the Middle colonies are identified on Poster 1: Delaware, New Jersey,

Pennsylvania, and New York

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen to find out more about the Middle colonies and to

find out whether their predictions are correct Comprehension Questions 15 minutes

1. Literal Which two Middle colonies did you hear about today? (New

York and New Jersey)

2. Inferential How did the Dutch acquire Manhattan Island, which

is part of New York City today? (In 1624, Peter Minuit thought he

“purchased” the land from the Munsee Native Americans.) Were the

Native Americans in agreement about the nature of this exchange?

(Historians believe that the Native Americans may have been intending

to build a long-term exchange relationship with the Dutch, rather than

handing over the land to them for so few goods. Historians suspect

that both groups misunderstood the nature of the exchange.)

3. Inferential How did the English acquire the Dutch colony of New

Netherlands and all of its settlements, including New Amsterdam?

(Charles II put his brother, James, the Duke of York, in charge of

taking New Netherlands from the Dutch. In 1664, the Duke of York

sent a number of warships, and the Dutch surrendered.) What did

the English ultimately rename the colony? (In honor of the Duke of

York, New Netherlands became the colony of New York, and New

Amsterdam became New York City.)

4. Aside from farming, what were some of the other

occupations in the Middle colonies? Why was slavery not as

concentrated in the Middle colonies as in the Southern colonies?

(Other occupations were sailor, trapper, lumberman, merchant,

craftsman, and shipbuilder. Unlike the Southern colonies, the

population grew more rapidly in the Middle colonies, and the people

in the Middle colonies hired paid workers rather than using enslaved

laborers.)

5. What were some of the reasons the Dutch, as well as

the English, wanted colonies in the New World? (to exercise religious

freedom; to take advantage of rich farmland; to pursue commercial

opportunities in the fur trade; etc.)

6. Describe other factors that shaped life in the Middle

colonies. (Fertile soil and a temperate climate allows for plentiful

agriculture; good harbors and long, wide rivers facilitated immigration

and trade; religious tolerance attracted people from many countries

and resulted in a diverse culture; etc.)

7. Inferential How was the colony of New Jersey founded? (The Duke

of York gave the southern part of the colony of New York to his two

good friends, George Carteret and John Berkeley. They named this

area New Jersey after the Isle of Jersey in the English Channel.)

8. Why were the Middle colonies called “the breadbasket”?

(Because of the Middle colonies’ favorable climate, they grew a lot of

wheat and were able to supply flour to England, as well as to other

English colonies, including the West Indies.)

9. Literal Were the colonies of New York and New Jersey founded

before or after New Hampshire? (before) [Have a volunteer place

Image Cards 16 (New York) and 17 (New Jersey) on the timeline

before New Hampshire and directly after North and South Carolina.

You may wish to write “1664” beneath the two cards, as they were

founded at approximately the same time.]

11:45-12:15 RECESS

12:15-1:00 LUNCH

1:00-2:00 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9

Lesson Number 7

Required Materials:The Age of Exploration; Vocabulary Cards;Worksheet 7.1board or chart paper; Worksheets 7.2, 8.4 Worksheets 7.3, 7.4 Worksheet 7.5

Objectives:

Reading Time Small Group: “John Cabot”

Grammar Build Sentences with Linking

Words for example

Extension Multiple Meanings of Words

Take-Home Material “John Cabot”

Advance Preparation:NONE

Instruction/Procedure:Small Group Silent: “John Cabot”

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students the name of today’s chapter is “John Cabot.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter and

then turn to the first page of the chapter

Build Sentences with Linking Words for example

• Tell students you will read two sentences aloud. Have them listen

first and then vote for the sentence they feel is more interesting and

informative.

• Tell students they should raise one hand to vote for the first sentence

and two hands to vote for the second sentence.

• Read the following sentences aloud:

• Sentence #1: The bird flew.

• Sentence #2: The happy-go-lucky bird flew high over the tree tops

in search of some sort of nibble, for example, a seed, a nut, or a

tasty morsel of bread

Multiple Meanings of Words

• Remind students that words can have multiple definitions or meanings.

• Say, “I can bat the ball with my baseball bat.”

• Ask, “What is the definition of the word bat as it is used first in the

sentence?” (the act of hitting a ball with a bat)

• Ask, “What is the part of speech for bat in this case?” (verb)

• Ask, “What is the definition of the word bat as it is used last in the

sentence?” (the wooden tool used in baseball to hit the ball)

• Ask, “What is the part of speech for bat in this case?” (noun)

• Point out to students that vocabulary words in the Reader can also

have multiple definitions or meanings as well as different parts of

speech.

• Tell students that today, they will receive a copy of a dictionary

page (Worksheet 7.3) that includes vocabulary words from The

Age of Exploration and they will notice that each word has multiple

definitions. They will also receive a sheet numbered 1–4 that they will

cut apart so they can use the numbers to show which definition they

have chosen during an oral activity (Worksheet 7.4).

• Say, “I will read eight sentences, each including one of the vocabulary

words from the dictionary page and you will determine which

definition matches the usage of the vocabulary word. If you think the

usage matches definition 1, you will hold up number 1, etc. You will

also read what part of speech your choice is.”

Supplemental Materials:NONE

2:00-2:50 MATH/READING- Small group

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions

(READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Tuesday,April 4th, 2017

8:00-8:45 ART

8:50-9:50 MATH

Lesson 10.2 a Writing Fractions

Objectives

Understand fractional notation.

Identify and write different fractions of a whole.

Name unit fractions up to 1/12.

Materials

Fractions discs/strips

Connect-a-Cubes

Teaching Strategies- Writing Fractions

Illustrate fractions, fractional notation and fractions of a whole using fraction circles. Display a whole circle to the class and tell the students that this is one whole. Next divide the circle into 3 equal parts or thirds, and place them together to form a whole. Ask students how many parts there are. Show students how to form the fraction by first removing two of the pieces. Tell the class that the remaining piece is one part out of three equal parts. Write ⅓ and tell students that this means one out of three equal parts. It is read as “one third”.

Add another third to the circle and ask students how many thirds there are now. Tell them this is 2 part out of the three equal parts that make the whole. Write on the board, ⅔= ⅓+⅓ . Add the last third to the circle. Ask students how many thirds there are. Guide the class to tell you how many thirds there are in the whole. Next, write on the board, ⅓+⅓+⅓ =3/3=1 whole. Repeat this with another fraction, such as ⅙, using a different shape for the whole,such as a fraction square or fraction strip. Add one sixth at a time,writing the new fraction as a sum of sixths.

Reading fractions- Write some fractions up to 12/12 on the board, ask students to name them. Apart from halves, we read the top number as a regular counting number, and the bottom as a ordinal number( third, fourth, fifth). Therefore, ⅗ is “ three fifths”. A four as the denominator can be either fourths or quarters. ¾ can be either “ three fourths or three quarters”.

Fractions of a whole- Illustrate fractions using other shapes. Draw another shape such as a bar on the board and divide it into fractions, such as eighths. Color several non-contiguous parts of it. Ask students what fraction of the whole is colored, and write down the fraction. Guide the class to see that the number on top represents the part that are colored and the number at the bottom is the total number of parts. Make sure students don’t make the mistake of writing the number of the uncolored parts for the bottom number in the fraction notation. write down the fraction.Color in a few other sections and ask students to tell y

.ou the fraction that is colored. Finally ask students to tell you how many more equal parts need to be colored for the entire bar or whole to be colored.

Assess- Have students do Tasks 1-4, Textbook p. 65-66.

Practice- WB Exercise 2-3 p.94-99

Practice C / Fraction of a Whole

Objectives: Practice converting money between dollars and cents. Practice multiplying and dividing money. Practice word problems involving multiplication and division.

Recognize and name fraction of a whole.

Make a whole a fraction

Teaching Strategies : Have students do Textbook p. 82, Practice C

Write a fraction on the board. An example is shown on the right. Ask students to draw a picture to show what this means. They may draw any shape, such as a square, rectangle, or a circle and divide that into 4 parts.

Practice: Have students do Textbook p. 82, Practice C, Workbook Exercise 1, p. 90-95

9:50- 10:30 CKLA EXTENSIONS

Thirteen Colonies Organizer (Instructional Masters 6B-1, 7B-1,

7B-2, and 7B-3)

Give each student a copy of Instructional Master 6B-1. Tell them they will

use what they have learned about the Massachusetts Bay colony to add

to the graphic organizer.

Give students copies of Instructional Masters 7B-1, 7B-2, and 7B-3. Tell

them they are going to record what they have learned about Connecticut,

Rhode Island, and New Hampshire in these graphic organizers to help

them remember the information.

Have students fill out the categories on each worksheet as they apply.

Remind them that many of these factors together make up the culture of

a place. Emphasize that students may not yet have enough information

to fill out every category completely, but that by the end of the domain

they will have captured the necessary information. (The colonies of New

Hampshire, New Jersey, and Delaware are not emphasized as much in

this domain as are the other colonies; you may wish to allow students

time to conduct research to learn more about these colonies.)

Have students draw a picture on the back of each worksheet to depict

one of the main ideas about each colony. Students may also write more

information on the back. Ask a few students to share their writing and

drawings with the class. Have students keep their worksheets in their

Colonial America notebook or folder to update and reference throughout

the domain.

10:30- 11:00 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00- 11:45 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 LESSON 9

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned? Timeline of the Americas

Where Are We? 10 Poster 1 (Regional Map of

Colonial America)

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Pennsylvania and the Quakers Poster 1; Poster 2 (Royal

Portrait Gallery)

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Image Cards 18, 19 15

Word Work: Founding

What Have We Already Learned?

Review the information covered thus far on the Timeline of the Americas,

highlighting the sequence of events. Briefly review with students the

information they heard in the previous read-aloud. To guide the review,

you may wish to use images from the read-alouds and/or the following

questions:

• What groups of people had already settled in the area of Manhattan

Island before the English colonized that area? (the Native Americans

and the Dutch)

• How did the Dutch acquire Manhattan Island, which is part of New

York City today? (In 1624, Peter Minuit thought he purchased the land

from the Munsee Native Americans.) Were the Native Americans in

agreement about the nature of this exchange? (Historians believe that

the Native Americans were intending to build a long-term exchange

relationship with the Dutch, rather than handing over the land to them

for so few goods. Historians suspect that both groups misunderstood

the nature of the exchange.)

• How was the colony of New York founded? (Charles II put his brother,

James, the Duke of York, in charge of taking New Netherlands from

the Dutch. In 1664, the Duke of York sent a number of warships, and

the Dutch surrendered.)

Where Are We?

Have students list the three colonial regions. (Southern, New England,

and Middle Atlantic) Using Poster 1 (Regional Map of Colonial America),

choose three students to individually locate and point to each of these

regions. Next, have students identify the colonies within the Middle

Atlantic region. (New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and Pennsylvania)

Have a volunteer point to the colony of Pennsylvania. Tell students that

Pennsylvania is the main topic of today’s read-aloud.

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen to learn more about the Middle colonies of

Delaware and Pennsylvania, and to predict how Pennsylvania received its

name.

Comprehension Questions

1. Literal Which colonies did you hear about in today’s read-aloud?

(Pennsylvania and Delaware) In which region were they located?

(Middle Atlantic) [Using Poster 1 (Regional Map of Colonial America),

have a volunteer point to the Middle Atlantic region, and then locate the

colony of Pennsylvania. Then have another volunteer point to Delaware.]

2. How was the colony of Pennsylvania founded? (King

Charles II gave William Penn, the son of Admiral Sir William Penn, the

land of Pennsylvania to repay his debts to the Penn family.) What does

Pennsylvania mean? (Penn’s woods)

3. Literal What city in Pennsylvania is called “the City of Brotherly Love”?

(Philadelphia) [Using Poster 1, have a volunteer locate Philadelphia.]

4. What were William Penn’s goals for founding

Pennsylvania? (Penn wanted to create a colony that would be a “holy

experiment.” He planned to welcome people of all faiths and from all

countries.) 5. Recount some of the important things that William

Penn did in Pennsylvania. (Penn planned the city of Philadelphia,

the first English settlement to be planned before it was built; made

a treaty with the Lenni-Lenape, also known today as the Delaware

Native Americans to purchase land in Pennsylvania; drafted some

of the colony’s first laws, such as the First Frame of Government

and the Charter of Privileges; promoted religious tolerance in

Pennsylvania; made it possible for Protestant men who were not

wealthy to be elected to government; made public education available

to all children; instituted trial by jury; reformed prisons by building

workhouses instead; was accused of treason in England; went to jail

twice—once for treason and once for unpaid debts; was released

both times; died in England.)

6. Inferential How did Philadelphia become an important center of

commerce, leading Pennsylvania to become one of the fastest growing

colonies? (Many people of different religions and nationalities

made their homes there because of religious tolerance. People even

moved from other English colonies to Philadelphia. Because there

were many employment opportunities there, as well as available land

and access to a harbor, the city of Philadelphia grew quickly.)

7. Who are the Quakers, and what influences did they

have on the colony of Pennsylvania? (Quakers are a Protestant group

that still exists today. They believe that people of all races, religions,

and genders are equal. They allowed women to speak up in Quaker

meetings, which during the colonial era was considered outrageous

by many. Quakers do not believe in war and refuse to fight in a war.

Quakers believe it is not necessary to go to church to worship God,

and they believe that people can pray to God directly and therefore

do not need priests or pastors to help them. The Quakers opposed

slavery and later fought against it.)

8. How would you compare and contrast the Pilgrims,

Puritans, and Quakers? (Answers may vary, but may include that

all three groups were seeking religious freedom. The Pilgrims and

Puritans were both initially a part of the Anglican Church of England.

The Pilgrims separated from it, whereas the Puritans sought to stay in

it and purify it. Quakers believed that all people are equal, can pray to

God directly, refused to support the Church of England; their religious

views were considered shocking at the time.)

11:45-12:15 RECESS

12:15-1:00 LUNCH

1:00- 2:00 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9

Lesson Number:8

Reading Time Whole Group Silent: “Henry

Hudson”

The Age of Exploration;

Vocabulary Cards;

Worksheet 8.1

Morphology Suffix Review: –ish, –ness, –able,

and –ible

Worksheet 8.2 25

Grammar Match Me if You Can Worksheets 8.3, 8.4; dice;

game markers

Spelling Blank Busters Worksheet 8.5 15

Take-Home Material “Henry Hudson” Worksheet 8.6

Whole Group Silent: “Henry Hudson”

Worksheet 8.1

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that the title of today’s chapter is “Henry Hudson.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter.

Review: –ish, –ness, –able, and –ible

For additional

practice, see Pausing

Point Worksheet PP7.

Worksheet 8.2

• Tell students that today, they will review the suffixes –ish, –ness,

– able, and –ible.

• Write the word fool on the board.

• Ask students to read the word. Discuss its meaning and ask students

to name the part of speech. (someone who is ridiculous and acts

without good sense or judgment; noun)

• Add the suffix –ish to fool and have students read the new word.

• Ask students what foolish means and what part of speech it is.

(having the characteristics of or like someone who is ridiculous and

acts without good sense or judgment; adjective) Match Me if You Can

Worksheets 8.3, 8.4

• Tell students today they will play Match Me if You Can.

• They will practice sentences that compare and sentences that

contrast.

• Pair up students.

• Have the partners shuffle together both sets of cards from Worksheet

8.4 that they cut apart in Lesson 7. If students have not cut apart the

cards, have them do so now.

• Have students place the game cards face down on the desk near the

game board.

• Have students follow these rules to play:

1. Begin at ‘Start’.

2. Roll a die, move your marker, and take a card.

3. Read the sentence aloud and state whether the sentence

compares or contrasts.

4. If the sentence on the card (compares or contrasts) matches

the space your marker is on (marked compare or contrast),

keep the card.

5. If the sentence on the card does not match the space your

marker is on, turn the card face down and place it on the

bottom of the pile.

6. Continue in this fashion until all cards are gone.

7. The player with the most cards wins.

• Move around the room, offering assistance if necessary.

• If time remains, have students reshuffle the cards and play the game

again.

Blank Busters

Worksheet 8.5

• Tell students that they will practice writing their spelling words for the

week.

• Tell students to turn to Worksheet 8.5. Note for students that some

sentences have two blanks.

• Point out to students that the spelling words are listed in the box on

the worksheet and on the board. Students may also have to add an

appropriate suffix to have the sentence make sense: –s, –ed, –ing,

– er, –es, or –ly.

• Ask students to read the statement in number 1 silently and fill in the

blank. When students have completed number 1, call on one student

to read number 1 aloud with the spelling word in the blank.

Wrap-Up

• Use the following questions to promote a discussion.

Discussion Questions on “Henry Hudson”

1. Literal What was the biggest barrier that Henry Hudson

encountered in trying to find the Northwest Passage? (ice) Justify

your answer with text evidence. (Answers may vary.)

2. Evaluative It may seem cruel that Henry Hudson was left behind.

Explain the crew’s actions from their point of view. (Answers may

vary.)

• Ask students to turn to Worksheet 8.1 and complete it independently

2:00-2:50 MATH/READING- Small group

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )Remind students that they have learned two parts of speech—nouns and

verbs—and review them. (A noun names a person, place, or thing. A verb can

show action.)

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Wednesday April 5th, 2017

8:00- 9.50 MATH

Review

Measurement

Math/Estimating and Measuring Lengths in Meters and Centimeters

Objectives: Review meters and centimeters as units of length. Find there number of centimeters in a meter. Convert a measurement in meters and centimeters to centimeters and vice versa.

Materials: Meter Sticks, Measuring Tape, Ruler and WB/TB

Assess: Have students work in pairs to do task 5, TB p.9 WB Exercise 1,p. 7

6.1 b Subtracting Meters and Centimeters

Have students do tasks 1113, TB p.11

Challenge: Have students work in pairs and write down as many bonds of 100 as they can, one at a time. Time limit is 5 minutes. The student pair with the greatest number of number bond wins.

Practice: WB Exercise 2, p.8

Division

Objectives: Divide tens, hundreds or thousands by a 1-digit number.

Materials: Number discs

Appendix 4.5b

Teaching Strategies: Draw or display 8 ones. Tell students the discs are going to be divided into two groups. Ask them how many disc will there be in group. (4) Separate the disc into 2 groups. Tell students that there are 4 ones in a group. Write “8 ones divided by 2=4 ones” and “8 divided by 2=4” on the whiteboard. Draw or display 8 tens. Tell students the discs are going to be divided into two groups. Ask the them how many discs will there be in each groups. (40) Separate the discs in two groups. Tell students that there are 4 tens in a group. Write b”8 tens divided by 2=4 tens” and “80 divided by 2=40” on the whiteboard. Show 8 hundreds. Tell students the discs are going to be divided into two groups. Ask them how many discs will there be in each group. Separate discs into 2 groups. Tell students that there are 4 hundreds in a group. Write “8 hundreds divided by 2 =4 hundreds” and “800 divided by 2=400” on the whiteboard. Tell students that 8 thousands will be divided into 2 groups. Ask them how many will be in a group. (400) Tell students that there will be 4 thousands in a group. Write “8 thousands divided by 2=4 thousands” and 8000 divided by 2 = 4000 on the whiteboard. Have students study the above equations. Ask them if they observed any pattern. Tell students that they need simply divide 8 by 2 and then add the correct number of 0’s.

Assess: Have students do tasks 6-8, TB p. 135

Practice: WB Exercise 19,p. 152-153

Review

Objectives: Review concepts learned in Unit 4

Teaching Strategies: Have students do Review 4, TB p. 137-139

This review can be done in class. H

Ave students do the problems one at a time on individual marker board or paper and share their answer. Provide re-teaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Practice Problem Solving: WB Review 4,p. 155-161

Tests: Units 1-4, Cumulative Tests A and B,p. 183-19

9:50- 10:30 CKLA EXTENIONS

City Planner

Have students think about the Think Pair Share discussion from earlier.

Ask them again, “If you could design your own city like William Penn

did for Philadelphia, what would be similar to or different from how

he planned the “City of Brotherly Love”? Would it be similar to John

Winthrop’s “city on a hill”? Would it be like Roger Williams’ safe haven?

Why or why not? Which region would it be in? What would it look like,

and what would you want the people who lived there to do? What would

you name your city? Does the name have a special meaning?”

Have each student write a paragraph about his/her city and draw a map

showing how it would look. Allow a few students to share their work with

the class.

Note: You may wish to complete this activity as a class, or have

students work with a partner or in a group

Thirteen Colonies Organizer (Instructional Masters 9B-1 and

9B-2)

Give each student copies of Instructional Masters 9B-1 and 9B-2. Tell

them they are going to record what they have learned about Pennsylvania

and Delaware on these graphic organizers.

Have students fill out the categories on each worksheet as they apply.

Remind them that many of these factors together make up the culture of

a place. Emphasize that students may not yet have enough information

to fill out every category completely, but that by the end of the domain

they will have captured the necessary information. (The colonies of

Connecticut, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Delaware are not

emphasized as much in this domain as are the other colonies; you may

wish to allow students to conduct research to learn more about these

colonies.)

Have students draw a picture on the back of the worksheet to depict

one of the main ideas about each colony. Students may also write more

information on the back. Ask a few students to share their writing and

drawings with the class. Have students keep their worksheets in their

Colonial America notebook or folder to update and reference throughout

the domain.

10:30-11:00 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:45 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 LESSON 10

nce

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned?

Timeline of the Americas

Where Are We?

Poster 1 (Regional Map of

Colonial America);

Making Predictions About the

Read-Aloud

chart paper, chalkboard, or

whiteboard

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Colonial Life

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions;

Poster 1

Word Work: Compulsory

What Have We Already Learned?

Note: You will need to remove the Image Cards from the Timeline of

the Americas in preparation for this exercise.

Display the nineteen Image Cards you have removed from the timeline

on a large table. Have students help to arrange them in the correct order.

Select a volunteer to affix each Image Card onto the timeline you created

as a class.

Review the events, key people, and important dates relative to each

colony as you recreate the timeline. You may wish to review the

mnemonic for remembering the order of colonial settlement if you

created one in Lesson 2.

Where Are We?

Use sticky notes, or something similar, to cover the names of the regions,

colonies, and cities on Poster 1 (Regional Map of Colonial America).

Have students uncover the notes as they locate each of the three colonial

regions, the thirteen colonies, and the important cities.

Making Predictions About the Read-Aloud

Have students draw conclusions from what they have heard so far and

make predictions about how people lived in the 1600s and 1700s in each

of the colonial regions. Have students think about the following questions:

• How did the people of the colonial era support themselves? What did

they manufacture, or make?

• Where did they live, and what were their houses like?

• How did they dress?

• What did they eat?

• What were their schools like? How else were children educated?

• How did they travel and communicate with others?

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen to learn more about everyday colonial life,

especially to hear about specific colonies and cities so they can add

information to their worksheets. Also tell students to also listen to find out

whether their predictions are correct.

Comprehension Questions

1. Were your predictions correct about everyday life in

colonial America? Why or why not? (Answers may vary.) [You may

wish to revisit the list created earlier to adjust and/or add to it.]

2. [Show Poster 1 (Regional Map of Colonial America).]

Who can locate the major cities of Philadelphia, Boston, New York,

and Charles Town? [Have a volunteer point to these cities.] Why did

these areas develop into important cities in colonial America? (These

cities are located on good harbors and in proximity to agricultural

areas. As a result, they developed into market centers and ultimately

into thriving cities. There was potential to do well in these cities.

These large, thriving cities still exist today.) Who can locate three other

important locations—Jamestown, Plymouth, and Savannah? [Have a

volunteer point to these locations on Poster 1.]

3. Compare and contrast the different ways boys and

girls were educated—both in their studies and in their occupations—

in colonial America and today. (Answers may vary. In colonial days,

children were taught at home, in private schools, in public schools,

in apprenticeships, and later, in colleges. In the beginning, only

boys went to school. All children, however, were taught how to

read. Children learned the skills they would need when they grew

up and had to support their own families. Boys were taught as

apprentices to be shoemakers, blacksmiths, carpenters, shipbuilders,

printers, surveyors, millers, glassmakers, and merchants. Boys

could also become lawyers, doctors, and teachers. Girls were

more limited; some were allowed to learn dressmaking. Most girls

had to learn household skills such as cooking, keeping a vegetable

garden, sewing, making candles, and raising children. Today, most

children attend compulsory K–12 private and public schools. Both

boys and girls are provided the same education. Some children

are homeschooled or are privately tutored. Many students finish

elementary and secondary schooling to attend a college or university.

Some learn a trade instead. Many men and women also obtain postgraduate

professional or academic degrees.)

4. What role did religion play in many of the colonies?

(The people who went to Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New

Hampshire were Pilgrims, Puritans, and others who wanted to

establish either a “city on a hill”—the ideal religious community—

or a place for religious freedom. In some of these communities,

attending church was compulsory. Pennsylvania and Maryland were

also established for religious reasons, namely for religious tolerance;

Roman Catholics established Maryland, and Quakers established

Pennsylvania.)

5 What did the colonists like to eat? (Colonists grew fruits

and vegetables. Corn, also known as maize, was used in a lot of

different ways, such as in corn bread, corn cake, boiled and fried

corn, corn soup, and corn on the cob. The colonists also hunted and

fished. Colonists had a sweet tooth. They loved to eat hard candy,

pies, and puddings.)

At a Glance Exercise Materials

11:45-12:15 RECESS

12 12:15 – 1:00 LUNCH

12: 1:00 – 2:00 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9 LESSON 9

Reading Time

Whole Group Silent: “The

Fur Trade and Samuel de

Champlain”

The Age of Exploration;

Vocabulary Cards;

Worksheet 9.1

Grammar Introduce Comparative and

Superlative Adjectives Using

Suffixes –er and –est

Worksheet 9.2 25

Morphology Prefix Review: pro– and anti– Worksheet 9.3

Spelling Word Sort Worksheet 9.4

Take-Home Material “The Fur Trade and Samuel de

Champlain”

Advance Preparation

Prepare and display the following comparative and superlative adjectives

poster: Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparative adjectives compare two nouns to show that one is

greater or more. The suffix –er is added to adjectives.

Superlative adjectives compare more than two nouns to show that

one is greatest or most. The suffix –est is added to adjectives.

Whole Group Silent: “The Fur Trade and Samuel de Champlain”

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students the title of today’s chapter is “The Fur Trade and Samuel

de Champlain.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter.

Previewing the Vocabulary

• Following your established procedures, preview the vocabulary as

well as assist students who need help with decoding. Since students

will be reading silently, make sure to display the image for the chapter

and preview both the vocabulary words and alternate forms of the

vocabulary words used in the chapter before they begin reading.

Introduce Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Using

Suffixes –er and –est

• Remind students that adjectives are descriptive words that describe

nouns or pronouns.

• Tell students that sometimes adjectives are used to compare nouns.

• Draw students’ attention to the comparative and superlative

adjectives poster you created in advance.

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparative adjectives compare two nouns to show that one is

greater or more. The suffix –er is added to adjectives.

Superlative adjectives compare more than two nouns to show

that one is greatest or most. The suffix –est is added to adjectives.

• Ask students to fill in the blank in the following sentence:

If Fred is 9 years old and Sam is 8 years old, Fred is than

Sam.

Prefix Review: pro– and anti–

• Tell students that you will read a sentence to them. The sentence

contains a word with either the prefix pro– or anti–. Students must

determine if the sentence demonstrates the meaning of the word. If

so, students should say “Yes.” If not, students should say “No.”

• Read the following sentence aloud to students:

We can project light onto the wall and use different items to make

shadows.

Word Sort

• Tell students they will sort words with the sound /oo/ spelled ‘oo’, ‘ew,

and ‘o’ and ‘o_e’.

• Have students turn to Worksheet 9.4.

• Ask students to identify the vowel patterns. (‘oo’ > /oo/, ‘ew’ > /oo/,

‘o’ > /oo/, and ‘o_e’ > /oo/)

Wrap-Up

Discussion Questions on “The Fur Trade and Samuel

de Champlain”

1. Literal Why were beaver hats popular in the 1600s and 1700s?

(They were very warm and helped people stay warm in cold

climates.)

2. Literal What were some of the things that the native people

wanted to trade for pelts? (Answers may vary but could include

hooks, knives, ax blades, kettles, wool blankets, tobacco, guns,

gunpowder, or glass beads from Europe.)

3. Literal How did the French traders make money? (They sent the

pelts back to Europe, where they were sold for a lot of money.)

rcise Materials Minute

2:00-2:50 MATH/READING- Small group

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Thursday, April 6th , 2017

8:00-8:45 PE

P

8:50-9:50 MATH

MATH/ Adding and Subtracting Meters and Centimeters in Compound Units

Objectives: Add and subtract meters and centimeters in compound units.

Teaching strategies: Write in the board ‘2 m 60 cm + 25 cm= Ask students how they get the answer. Tell students that since there are no meters in front of 25 cm, they can just add the centimeters. The sum of 60 cm and 25 cm is 85 cm. Write on the board ‘2 m 60 cm +25 – 2 m 85 cm’

Assess: Have students do tasks 14-15, TB p.12

Practice: Exercise 1,p. 113-114

Extra Practice: 1, p. 113-114

Tests: 1A and 1B,p. 1-6

6.2 Introduction to Kilometers

Objectives: Understand the kilometer as a unit of measurement. Convert a measurement in kilometers and meters and vice versa

Materials: Map of buildings around school, Map of cities closest to school

Teaching Strategies: Have students look at TB p.13. Bring to their attention that a bus is about 10 m long. Tell students to imagine 10 meter sticks lying end to end. Say that the total length of the stick is 10 m. Tell students that to get 1 kilometer, imagine 100 such buses parked front to end. Or, they can imagine 1000 meter sticks placed end to end. A kilometer is little more than half a mile. Write “ on the board” 1 km=1000 m

Use a familiar landmark near the school that is about 1 km away. Draw a roughly scaled map on the board showing the school the landmark and indicate the distance of 1 km . Using the map or list, ask students how far it is to ___ from_______ in meters. Tell students that sometimes they may get mixed up between centimeters and kilometers. Here’s a way to help them remember. The prefix centi means ‘a hundred. For an example, a centipede has 100 legs. There are 100 cents in a dollar. 100 centimeters= 1 meter. The prefix ‘kilo-’ means thousand. 1 kilometer= 1000 meters.

Assess: Have students do tasks 1-6, TB p. 14-15

Practice: WB Exercise 4,p. 11-14

Word Problems / Practice B

Objectives : Solve word problems involving the subtraction of money.

Practice adding and subtracting money.

Practice word problems involving addition and subtraction of money

Teaching Strategies: Have student work on tasks 10 and 11 on their own before discussing their answer. You can also call upon a student to present the solution.

Call some students to explain how they solved the problems and if their answers are reasonable. Provide any reteaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Practice: Workbook Exercise 5, p.77-80, Exercise 3, p. 159-162

9:50 – 10:30 CKLA EXTENSIONS

Thirteen Colonies and Colonial America Acrostics Review

As you conduct this review of what students have learned about the

thirteen colonies and their regions, have students reference and add to

the graphic organizers for each colony in their Colonial America notebook

or folder as applicable. Have them also review and/or add to the Colonial

America Acrostics you started in Lesson 1, using words, phrases, and/or

sentences from their worksheets. You may wish to do this as a class, or

have students work in groups or with a partner.

For any categories that are still not complete on the graphic organizers,

you may wish to assign certain students or groups a question to research

and share with the class. This may also be done during the Pausing

Point.

Using Poster 1 (Regional Map of Colonial America), point to each region,

and have students identify some of the unique characteristics of the

Southern, New England, and Middle Atlantic colonies. For each region,

have students describe the geography, climate, and culture of that region

(e.g., the ways colonists supported themselves, the crops colonists

grew, reasons why colonists settled in the specific region, etc.). Possible

discussion points are listed below.

• The Southern colonies had a warm climate and were primarily

agricultural. Southern colonies had many small farms and large

plantations. Their main crops were tobacco, rice, and indigo. These

were called cash crops. The Southern colonies were reliant on

slavery to support their labor needs. Colonists moved to Maryland for

religious reasons, but most others settled in the Southern colonies for

economic reasons. Important cities in the South included Jamestown,

Savannah, and Charleston (Charles Town).

• The New England colonies were colder and had a shorter growing

season than the Southern colonies. Also, the soil was rockier and

therefore not as good for farming. Because the New England colonies

had a lot of trees, they exported timber to England, the West Indies, and to other colonial regions. Shipbuilding and fishing were big

industries, as was fur trading. The colonists who first settled in the

New England colonies did so primarily for religious reasons. Pilgrims

and Puritans were the first settlers of the New England colonies. The

colonists in New England did not depend heavily on slavery, although

there were enslaved Africans working in some towns. Important cities

in New England included Boston and Plymouth.

• The Middle colonies had a somewhat mild climate and were

primarily agricultural. Their main crop was wheat. They became “the

breadbasket” of the colonies because of the large amount of flour

they were able to produce in mills and export to England and the

West Indies. Because of high immigration to the Middle colonies,

Quaker opposition, and smaller farms, slavery did not develop there

to the same extent as it did in the Southern colonies. Colonists

moved to the Middle colonies for both religious and economic

reasons. The Dutch were the first settlers of New York, once called

New Amsterdam, but this area was eventually taken over by the

English. Quakers were the first large group of settlers in Pennsylvania.

Important cities in the Middle colonies included Philadelphia and New

York City.

Colonial Pen Pals

Divide the class into three groups. Assign one colonial region to each

group: Southern, New England, and Middle Atlantic. Within each region,

allow students to choose a colony. Next, have students from different

regions/colonies pair up and exchange pen pal letters as if they were

living in those colonies. In their letters, have students describe their

everyday life in the colony, including their name and age, where they live,

whether or not they have a trade, if he or she goes to school, etc. Have

students ask each other questions about his or her colony. You may wish

to have students reference the index cards they discussed in the Think

Pair Share. As time allows, have students write responses to each other.

This may also be done during the Pausing Point.

Note: The additional thirty minutes for Domain Writing begins in this

lesson. In addition to the writing activities in the Extensions, there

are also several writing opportunities in the Pausing Points. Time

may also be devoted to researching more information about certain

colonies. Refer to the schedule in the Introduction to help guide the

remaining five days of this domain.

10:30-11:00 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:45 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 LESSON 11

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already

Learned?

Timeline of the Americas;

Instructional Master 11A-1;

red, white, and blue colored

pencils (optional)

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud The Road to Revolution, Part I U.S. map 20

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Image Card 20

Word Work: Uninhabited drawing paper, drawing tools

What Have We Already Learned? (Instructional Master 11A-1)

Give each student a copy of Instructional Master 11A-1. Tell students that

they are going to use the Timeline of the Americas and what they have

learned to list the thirteen colonies in order of settlement on the stripes of

the colonial flag. Have students write the dates of establishment beside

Jamestown (Virginia) and Plymouth (Massachusetts) colonies. If you

have written dates for all colonies on the timeline, you may wish to have

students transcribe dates for all.

As time allows, you may also wish to have students color the colonial

flag with white stars on a blue background, with alternating red and white

stripes (beginning with red at the top). This may also be done during the

Pausing Point..

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully to hear about many conflicts that arose

among the British, French, Spanish, and Native Americans after the

establishment of the thirteen colonies. Tell them to listen to find out more

about the trail of events that led the colonists to feel less and less like

Europeans and to eventually fight for their freedom from Britain. Comprehension Questions 15 minutes

1. Why were conflicts increasing among the Spanish,

French, and English? (They each had settlements in the Americas and

were land hungry; they clashed over the areas of North America they

wanted for themselves; however, these areas were not uninhabited.)

How were the Native Americans involved? (They were distressed;

many of them had moved westward to escape the influx of colonists,

and now the English were beginning to enter that area as well.)

2. What war broke out in 1675 between the Native

Americans and the English in New England? (King Philip’s War, led

by Chief Metacom of the Wampanoag, son of Chief Massasoit) What

was the result? (The English won, and destroyed even more of the

Wampanoag homes.)

Show image 11A-3: French and Indian War battle scene

3. Inferential Describe what you see in this image. What was the name

of this war between the French and English, which involved Native

Americans fighting on both sides? (French and Indian War) Where was

this war fought? (in the forests of North America) Where was another

war occurring between France and England? (in other parts of the

world where the French and the British competed for land, such as

Europe, the West Indies, and India) How did the French and Indian

War end? (The British captured Quebec, the French capital, and won

the war. The French and English signed a peace treaty.) Did the Native

Americans sign a peace treaty? (no)

4. Literal Did the French and Indian War occur before or after the

thirteen colonies were established? (after) [Have a volunteer place

Image Card 20 (French and Indian War) on the timeline after the

colony of Georgia. You may wish to write “1754” beneath the card.]

5. Inferential Because the Native Americans did not sign a peace treaty,

which conflict occurred next between the British and Chief Pontiac

of the Ottawa tribe, who led about thirteen united groups against

the British? (Pontiac’s Rebellion) What was the result? (The British

realized it would be impossible to defend this land, or the settlers on

it. King George III issued a proclamation stating that settlers could not

live on land west of the Appalachian Mountains.) 6. ✍ Inferential How did all of these battles affect colonial life? (To recover from the cost of these battles, the Parliament of Britaindecided that taxing the colonists was a good way to help pay for the

wars.) Do you think this was a just or unjust decision? Why? (Answers

may vary.)

7. What were the three acts passed by Parliament that

taxed the colonists? (Sugar Act, Stamp Act, and Quartering Act)

Compare and contrast these three taxes. In other words, how were

they similar, and how were they different? (Similarities—They were

all imposed by Britain on the colonists without representation; they

all cost the colonists money; they were created to help pay for the

war debt; etc. Differences—the Sugar and Stamp Acts were taxes on

products the colonists used every day, but the Sugar Act was on food

and other household goods, whereas the Stamp Act was on printed

reading materials, such as newspapers and cards. The Quartering

Act was very different as it required colonists to provide supplies and

lodging to British soldiers.) How did the outspoken colonists react

to all of these taxes? What was the saying used to describe how

they felt? (They felt distressed and that it was unjust; they said, “No

taxation without representation!” They steeled themselves for a fight

against Britain.)

I am going to ask a question. I will give you a minute to think about the

question, and then I will ask you to turn to your neighbor and discuss the

question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you discussed

with your partner.

8. Think Pair Share: Why do you think the colonists began

to feel less and less like Europeans? (Answers may vary, but may

11:45-12:15 RECESS

12:15-1:00 LUNCH

1:00 – 2:00 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9 LESSON 10

Spelling Spelling Assessment Worksheet 10.1; optional pens 25

Reading Time Whole Group Silent: “A History

of People in North America”

The Age of Exploration;

Vocabulary Cards;

Worksheet 10.2

Grammar Practice Comparative and

Superlative Adjectives Using

Suffixes –er and –est

Worksheet 10.3

Spelling Practice Dictionary Skills

dictionaries; copies of Word

Meanings page, if needed;

Worksheet 10.4

Advance Preparation

Make sure to erase the spelling table from the board and/or turn the table

over so that students cannot refer to it during the assessment.

Display the following comparative and superlative adjectives poster:

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparative adjectives compare two nouns to show that one is

greater or more. The suffix –er is added to adjectives.

Superlative adjectives compare more than two nouns to show that

one is greatest or most. The suffix –est is added to adjectives.

Write the following sentence on the board or chart paper for use during

the second Spelling lesson and keep it covered until the lesson:

Who would be more gregarious, a clown or a loner?

If there are not enough print or online dictionaries, photocopy the Word

Meanings on the next page for use with Worksheet 10.4.

Word Meanings

gregarious—adjective: sociable; liking companionship (gregariously, gregariousness)

flapjack—noun: pancake (flapjacks)

subside—verb: to sink to a lower level (subsided, subsiding, subsides)

offhand—adjective: without previous thought or preparation (offhanded)

marquee—noun: a roof-like structure over a theater that usually posts the name of the

movie currently playing

Spelling Assessment

Worksheet 10.1

• Have students turn to Worksheet 10.1 for the spelling assessment.

• If you would like for students to have pens, this is the time to pass

them out.

• Tell students that for this assessment, they will write the words under

the header to which they belong. For example, if you call out the word

news they would write that word under the header ‘ew’ > /ue/.

Whole Group Silent: “A History of People in North America”

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that the title of today’s chapter is “A History of People in

North America”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter

Practice Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Using Suffixes –er and –est

Worksheet 10.3

• Direct students’ attention to the comparative and superlative

adjectives poster you prepared and displayed earlier.

Practice Dictionary Skills

Worksheet 10.4

Note to Teacher

Pair up students to discuss word meanings and share a print or online

dictionary

• Remind students of the dictionary activity in Lesson 5 and tell them

that today, they will follow the same procedure.

• Tell students that you will ask them a question.

• Say, “Sometimes you are asked a question and you don’t understand

the meaning of all the words, so it is hard to answer.”

Wrap-Up

• Ask students to turn to Worksheet 10.2 and complete it as a teacherguided

activity.

2:00-2:50 MATH/READING- Small group

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Friday ,April 7th, 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials MUSIC/DRAMA

P

8:50-9:50 MATH

MATH

MATH/ More Division

Objectives: Divide tens, hundreds or thousands by a 1-digit number.

Materials: Number discs

Appendix 4.5b

Teaching Strategies: Draw or display 8 ones. Tell students the discs are going to be divided into two groups. Ask them how many disc will there be in group. (4) Separate the disc into 2 groups. Tell students that there are 4 ones in a group. Write “8 ones divided by 2=4 ones” and “8 divided by 2=4” on the whiteboard. Draw or display 8 tens. Tell students the discs are going to be divided into two groups. Ask the them how many discs will there be in each groups. (40) Separate the discs in two groups. Tell students that there are 4 tens in a group. Write b”8 tens divided by 2=4 tens” and “80 divided by 2=40” on the whiteboard. Show 8 hundreds. Tell students the discs are going to be divided into two groups. Ask them how many discs will there be in each group. Separate discs into 2 groups. Tell students that there are 4 hundreds in a group. Write “8 hundreds divided by 2 =4 hundreds” and “800 divided by 2=400” on the whiteboard. Tell students that 8 thousands will be divided into 2 groups. Ask them how many wil

l be in a group. (400) Tell students that there will be 4 thousands in a group. Write “8 thousands divided by 2=4 thousands” and 8000 divided by 2 = 4000 on the whiteboard. Have students study the above equations. Ask them if they observed any pattern. Tell students that they need simply divide 8 by 2 and then add the correct number of 0’s.

Assess: Have students do tasks 6-8, TB p. 135

Practice: WB Exercise 19,p. 152-153

Review 4

Objectives: Review concepts learned in Unit 4

Teaching Strategies: Have students do Review 4, TB p. 137-139

This review can be done in class. Have students do the problems one at a time on individual marker board or paper and share their answer. Provide re-teaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Practice Problem Solving: WB Review 4,p. 155-161

Tests: Units 1-4, Cumulative Tests A and B,p. 183-194

9:50- 10:30 CKLA EXTENIONS

A Ship by Any Other Name

Show image 7A-2: Ship laden with supplies

Ask students to describe what they see in the image. Ask them what role

ships played in the establishment of the English colonies. Guide students

to discuss the importance of ships in allowing people to journey across

the Atlantic Ocean to the New World—not only the English colonists,

but also the European explorers they have heard about. Discuss others

whose lives were influenced by ships, such as the pirate buccaneers,

trade merchants, English navy, fishermen, and shipbuilders. Remind

students that shipbuilding was a crucial part of the economy of the New

England colonies.

Ask students to list some of the names of the ships they have heard

about in the read-alouds. Review the people, events, and significant

dates surrounding the ships. (Captain Newport and his men sailed to

Jamestown in 1606 on the Discovery, Susan Constant, and Godspeed,

and arrived about five months later in 1607. Later, the Patience and

Deliverance were sent to Jamestown colony laden with supplies, but by

the time they arrived—and they barely made it—the ships were almost

out of supplies. The Pilgrims and others sailed to Plymouth in 1620 on

the Mayflower. William Penn sailed to Pennsylvania on the Welcome.)

Ask students to think about what type of ship they would like to design

and/or command as a captain. Have them write a paragraph about their

ship, including its name and the reason for its name, its purpose and/or

destination, what it looks like, and what types of people would travel on

it. Have students illustrate their ship. Allow a few students to share their

writing and drawings with the class.

You may also wish to show others images of ships from the domain, such

as image 6A-4 of the Mayflower in a turbulent storm, and have students

respond to the image in a writing prompt to describe the setting and

event depicted. As students work, model and encourage students to use

domain-related vocabulary.

10:30-11:00 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00 -11:45 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 10 LESSON 12

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned? Timeline of the Americas

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud The Road to Revolution, Part II U.S. map 20

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions U.S. flag

Word Work: Independence chart paper, chalkboard.

What Have We Already Learned?

Review with students what was learned in the previous lesson. You

may wish to show images from the read-aloud and/or ask the following

questions:

• What were the three conflicts called between the Native Americans

and colonists over land? (King Philip’s War, Pontiac’s Rebellion, and

French & Indian War)

• Who won these conflicts? (The English won the first war against the

Wampanoag; the Native Americans managed to keep the colonists

away from their land for a time after the thirteen united groups fought

them in the second war.)

• [Point to the Timeline of the Americas.] Did the French and Indian War

occur before or after the thirteen colonies were established? (after)

• Who fought in the French and Indian War? (the English, French, and

Native American groups on both sides)

• What were the three acts passed by Parliament that taxed the

colonists? (Sugar Act, Stamp Act, and Quartering Act)

• Why were these acts passed? (Britain was trying to find ways to raise

money to help pay their war debts.)

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully to hear more about the trail of events that

led the colonists to feel less and less like Europeans and to fight for their

freedom from Britain. Comprehension Questions 15 minutes

1. Which outspoken Patriot did you hear about who

was a lawyer from Virginia? (Patrick Henry) What did he do, and

what famous quote is he known for today? (He spoke out against

what many colonists felt were Britain’s unjust and intolerable acts

by standing behind the saying “no taxation without representation!”

Henry is known for the saying “give me liberty, or give me death!”)

You heard about another Patriot, Samuel Adams. What was the name

of the group of Patriots he organized? (the Sons of Liberty)

2. Why did the colonists boycott products from Britain,

such as tea, wool, paper, and silk? (Because Britain was taxing the

colonists on these items, the colonists refused to buy them.) How did

the colonists replace these items? (They started producing their own

products, such as “liberty tea.”)

Show image 12A-3: Boston Massacre; Crispus Attucks

3. Describe what is happening in this image. (In the

Boston Massacre, a fight broke out between the colonists and British

soldiers. The soldiers fired their guns into the crowd and killed five

colonists. The colonists were horrified, and tensions grew between

them and Britain. Crispus Attucks was the first one killed and became

a hero to the colonists for standing up for what he believed in.)

Show image 12A-4: Boston Tea Party

4. Describe what is happening in this image. (The Sons of

Liberty dressed up in part like Native Americans and dumped British

tea into the Boston harbor, an event known today as the Boston Tea

Party.) Why did they do this? (These Patriots were not only boycotting

the tea, they were also sending a message with their act of destroying

the tea that they would not tolerate the injustice of the British taxes.)

Describe what is happening in this image, and explain

how the saying “one, if by land, and two, if by sea” is related. (Paul

Revere rode through the night to warn colonists at Concord that the

British were coming to seize their weapons. Later, this line became

part of a famous poem based on this event called “Paul Revere’s

Ride.”)

5What was the significance of Paul Revere’s ride? (Although

Revere was captured, he was first able to warn the colonists, who

then moved their weapons and kept the British from taking them.)

6. Inferential Explain the meaning of the saying “the shot heard round

the world.” (This was a line from a poem written years later about

this event; the first shot that was fired that started the American

Revolution had far-reaching impacts upon all of history and the world.)

7. Who were some of the colonial leaders who met in the

Continental Congress, and who are known today as Founding

Fathers? (George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson,

James Madison, Patrick Henry, Benjamin Franklin, John Hancock)

Which of these was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the colonial

army and later became the first U.S. president? (George Washington)

8. On what date did the Founding Fathers approve the Declaration of

Independence? (July 4, 1776) What did this document signify? (It

stated that the colonists wanted to be free of Britain to create their

own country.)

Show image 12A-8: Declaration of Independence; the Stars and

Stripes colonial flag

9. Compare and contrast the present-day U.S. flag and the Stars and

Stripes flag from the colonial period. (Similarities—Both flags have

thirteen red and white stripes; both flags represent the independent

United States; etc. Differences—The colonial flag only had thirteen

white stars in the corner to represent the thirteen colonies, whereas

the present-day U.S. flag has fifty stars to represent the fifty states;

etc.)

11:45-12:15 RECESS

12:15-1:00 LUNCH

1:00-2:00 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 9 LESSON 11

Reading Time Whole Group Silent: “Caribbean

Words”

The Age of Exploration;

Vocabulary Cards;

Worksheet 11.1

Spelling Introduce Spelling Words Worksheet 11.

Take-Home Material

Family Letter; “A History of

People in North America;”

“Caribbean Words”

Worksheets 11.2–11.4

Advance Preparation

If you wish, you may draw the spelling table on the board or chart paper

before beginning this lesson.

‘f’ > /f/ ‘ff’ > /f/ ‘ph’ > /f/ ‘gh’ > /f/ Whole Group Silent: “Caribbean Words”

Chapter 11

Worksheet 11.1

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that the title of today’s chapter is “Caribbean Words.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter.

Previewing the Vocabulary

• Following your established procedures, preview the vocabulary as

well as assist students who need help with decoding. Since students

will be reading silently, make sure to display the image for the chapter

and preview the vocabulary words before they begin reading.

Vocabulary for “Caribbean Words”

1. steer—to control the direction of (106)

2. cheap—does not cost much (112)

3. popular—liked by many people (112)

Guided Reading Supports and Purpose for Reading

Pages 102–113

• Ask students to turn to Worksheet 11.1.

• Tell students that as they are reading this chapter, they should write

what they think the answer is to each riddle before they turn the page

to see what the answer is.

• As students read silently, you should circulate throughout the room,

lending assistance as needed.

Wrap-Up

• Use Worksheet 11.1 to promote a discussion of the chapter. Introduce Spelling Words

Worksheet 11.2

• Tell students that this week, they will review words with the sound of

/f/ spelled ‘f’, ‘ff’, ‘ph’, and ‘gh’.

• As you introduce each spelling word, write it on the board,

pronouncing each word as you write it.

1. phony

2. identify

3. spherical

4. laughing

5. stuffing

6. affect

7. fairest

8. phrase

9. tougher

10. fare

11. enough

12. elephant

13. trophy

14. giraffe

15. funnel

16. phases

17. roughly

18. Challenge Word: probably

19. Challenge Word: weather

20. Challenge Word: whether

Content Word: expedition

2:00-2:50 MATH/READING- Small group

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions

(READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up