LESSON PLANS FEB 06-10 2017

Monday , February 6th , 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials PE/ART

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8:50-9:35 Math/Days and Weeks

Objectives: Convert between weeks and days in compound units

Materials: Calender page

Teaching Strategies: Show students a calendar page. Ask students how many days there are in a week. What are they called? Tell students that there are 7 days in a week. Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs, Fri, Sat and Sun. Write on board 1 week=7 days

Ask students how many days there are inn 2 weeks, 3 weeks, 4 weeks. Have students supply you with a answer. Ask students how many days there are in 4 weeks 6 days. Tell students that they can multiply the number of weeks by 7, and then add the number of days. Multiply 4 by 7, they get 28 days. Add 28 to 6 days. That is the total of 34 days. You may illustrate a few more examples using some of the problems below:

-6 weeks 3 days(45 days)

-3 weeks 6 days(27 days)

-8 weeks 4 days(60 days)

-5 weeks 2 days (37 days)

Ask students how many weeks are there in 21 days. Tell students that they can count by 7 until they reach 21 which equals 3 weeks. Ask students if there is another way of finding the answer. Tell students that besides counting by 7, they can also divide by 7. 21 divided by 7=3 hence the answer is 3 weeks. Ask students how many weeks 56 days is. Tell students that 56 divided by 7=8. So 56 days is 8 weeks.

Assess: Have students do task 4, TB p. 123

Practice: WB Exercise 8,.p. 139-140

9:40-10:25 DOMAIN IN CLASS ACTIVITIES

Big Bang Balloon

Tell students that they are going to observe you recreate a simple version

of the Big Bang using a balloon. Hold up an uninflated balloon. Remind

students that according to the Big Bang Theory, all matter first existed

in an extremely small, dense, hot speck. Tell students that the balloon

represents how some scientists believed the universe to be before the

Big Bang; imagine the balloon is a “speck” that contains all matter in its

own mini-universe. Use a marker to draw small dots on the balloon to

represent the galaxies that formed after the universe suddenly expanded.

Ask students to name the galaxy in which our own solar system exists.

(Milky Way) Draw a dot for the Milky Way in a different color. Ask

students what facts they remember about the Milky Way. (Our Milky Way

Galaxy is shaped like a spiral disk with stars in the middle; has billions of

stars; and has neighbor galaxies.)

Explain to students that when scientists perform experiments like the one

they are about to observe, they first predict what they think will happen.

Have students predict what they think will happen to the galaxy dots on

the balloon when the balloon is blown up, and to share their predictions

with a partner. You may wish to record several predictions on chart

paper, a chalkboard, or a whiteboard.

Then, blow up the balloon. You may wish to inflate and deflate the

balloon more than once so students can have multiple chances to

watch the balloon as it expands. Once all students have had a chance

to watch the balloon expand, discuss with students what they noticed.

Ask students to describe what happened as the balloon expanded. (The

space between each of the “galaxies” increased.) Compare what actually

happened with what students predicted. You may wish to record their

answers on chart paper, a chalkboard, or a whiteboard. Make sure that

students include the following:

• The “galaxies” move away from each other in all directions—up,

down, front, back, and to both sides.

• The farther apart the galaxy dots are, the faster they separate. Explain that the way the balloon expanded in three dimensions with the

galaxy dots moving apart in several different ways (up, down, front, back,

and both sides) is the same way that some scientists believe the universe

expanded, according to the Big Bang Theory

Sequencing the Big Bang (Instructional Master 7B-1)

Use Instructional Master 7B-1 to have students sequence the events of

the Big Bang in order from start to finish. Write the number 1 next to the

first event, 2 next to the second, and so on. Help students describe the

logical connection between events by identifying particular words and

sentences that provide clues to the order of events in the formation of the

universe.

You may wish to have students complete this activity individually, in small

groups, or as a class. Have students collect their worksheets in their

Space Notes notebooks or folder.

10:30-10:55 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:40 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 6 LESSON 8

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned? Instructional Master 7B-1

(optional)

Essential Background

Information or Terms Image Card 22

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Nicolaus Copernicus Image Card 23;

world map or globe

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Image Card 22 15

Word Work:

Geocentric and

Heliocentric

What Have We Already Learned?

Remind students that in the previous lesson they learned about the Big

Bang Theory. Ask students to define the word theory and to explain what

the Big Bang Theory is specifically.

Essential Background Information or Terms

Tell students that in today’s read-aloud, they will again hear vocabulary

words that are related to the process or work of science and also

sometimes to our everyday lives. Ask students if they have ever heard

the word hypothesis and what they think it means. Explain that people

often come up with a hypothesis to explain why something happens as

it does.

Purpose for Listening

Explain to students that back when Nicolaus Copernicus was alive,

everyone had a very different idea of how the universe was arranged. Tell

students to listen to find out how people used to think the universe was

arranged and how they responded to Copernicus’s new ideas.

Comprehension Questions

1.[Show Image Card 22 (Statue of Copernicus) and tell

students that this is a statue in Copernicus’s home country of Poland.]

Who was Nicolaus Copernicus? (Copernicus was a Polish astronomer

from the 1500s; he was also a doctor and a clergyman.) What are

some words you might use to describe Copernicus? (Answers may

vary, but may include words like thoughtful, curious, brave, logical,

educated, etc.) What tools and methods did Copernicus use for

studying space? (He made many observations, he kept records of his

data, he performed mathematical calculations, and he studied other

astronomers’ views.)

Show image 8A-3: The geocentric, or Earth-centered, view

2. What did astronomers believe for thousands of years

before Copernicus’s time about the arrangement of the universe?

(They believed that Earth was at the center of everything and that it

stood still while all the other celestial bodies orbited it.) What is the

word that describes this earth-centered view? (geocentric)

Show image 8A-6: The strange and unexpected movements of the

planets

3. Astronomers in Copernicus’s time were puzzled about

the movement of Mars and some of the other planets. What question

did they have about the planets’ movements, and how did this lead

Copernicus to a new understanding? (Astronomers wondered why

Mars and some of the planets seem to travel backward at times in

their paths across the night sky. This led Copernicus to think of other

arrangements of the planets and the sun that would explain this odd

and unexpected movement.)

4. Why did people have a difficult time believing that Earth

was spinning in space? (They thought that if Earth spun in space they

would be thrown off it, as would all of the objects on Earth.) Why don’t

people, objects, and the air we breathe float off into space? (Earth’s

gravity is a force that keeps everything from disappearing into space.)

5.What was new about Copernicus’s view of the world?

(He supported a heliocentric view with the sun in the center and Earth

and the other planets orbiting the sun.) What did people think about

Copernicus’s heliocentric ideas? (People were opposed to his ideas

and very upset by them; he was afraid he would be punished.)

6. Name another astronomer who later worked to prove

Copernicus’s heliocentric view that Earth and other planets orbited

the sun. (Galileo) How did he support Copernicus’s ideas with his own

discoveries? (Galileo used a telescope and saw that Jupiter had four

moons orbiting it, showing that there were some things in space that

didn’t orbit around Earth.)

7.What is the difference between a hypothesis and a

theory? (A hypothesis is an explanation about why something occurs;

a theory is a hypothesis that has been tested and has become widely

accepted.)

8. Evaluative Describe a hypothesis that you have about something

in your life. What evidence do you have for your hypothesis? What

else could you do to test your hypothesis more? (Answers may vary.)

9 What events on Earth occur on a diurnal or daily basis?

(Answers may vary, but may include day and night, the tides, and the

sun rising and setting.)

I am going to ask a question. I will give you a minute to think about the

question, and then I will ask you to turn to your neighbor and discuss the

question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you discussed

with your partner.

10. Think Pair Share: Copernicus’s curiosity for learning

about astronomy led him to observe the night sky and explore new

ideas in his mind. Eventually, his passion for astronomy led him to an

important new idea for the world. Think about your life and the things

in which you are most interested. Is there a topic or activity which

you have an interest in or a passion for? What is it, and why does it

hold your interest? Is there a way in which you’d like to make a new

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

12:50-1:25 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 6

Lesson Number:9

Required Materials:WORKBOOK 6

Objectives:

Reading Time Whole Group: “Loki’s

Punishment”

Gods, Giants, and Dwarves;

Vocabulary Cards; fiction

chart; Worksheet 9.1

Grammar Build Sentences with the

Conjunction because

Worksheet 9.2

Remediation and

Enrichment

Remediate and Enrich Student

Knowledge choice of material 30

Take-Home Material “Loki’s Punishment” Worksheet 9.3

Instruction/Procedure:

Whole Group: “Loki’s Punishment”

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that the title of today’s chapter is “Loki’s Punishment.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter.

Previewing the Vocabulary

• Following your established procedures, preview the vocabulary as

well as assist students who need help with decoding.

Vocabulary for “Loki’s Punishment”

1. patience—able to put up with problems without getting upset

(74)

2. vow—to make an important and serious promise (vowed) (74)

3. serpent*—a snake (76)

4. wound—an injury caused when something cuts or breaks the

skin (76)

5. writhe—to twist and turn in pain (writhed) (76)

6. agony—severe pain (76)

7. prophecy—a prediction of what will happen in the future

(prophecies) (78)

8. triumph—victory (78)

9. fate—the things that will happen to a person, destiny, fortune (80)

Guided Reading Supports and Purpose for Reading

• Review with students all that happened to Balder and how Loki was

involved. You may choose to use the fiction chart in your discussion.

• Remind students that as they are reading, if they do not recall the

meaning of a word, they can always look it up in the glossary.Build Sentences with the Conjunction because

Worksheet 9.2

• Read the following sentence to students:

The furry, black cat scampered quickly up the winding staircase early

in the morning because she was hungry.

• Ask students if they think the sentence is interesting and informative

and why. (The sentence has adjectives, adverbs, and the conjunction

because, which adds another simple sentence, all of which help make

it interesting and informative.)

• Tell students that in writing, sentences should be long enough to be

interesting to readers. Interesting and informative sentences also

include descriptive words and phrases.

Skill Check:

• Have students help you fill in the fiction chart for this chapter. Use

details from the chapter and images. Compare and contrast with

previously read chapters. You may wish to use the following questions

to generate student ideas:

Characters: Who are the main characters in this chapter?

Setting: Where do the events in this chapter take place?

Plot: What happens in this chapter?

Notes/Reflection/Reminds: (Handwrite these in the box after you teach each lesson)

•Sample Questions. Please add your own and be reflective!

•How did the lesson go? What went well? With what did you struggle? What could have made the lesson better? Did the students understand? Who is still struggling? What do you need to change next year? How are you going to follow-up to make sure the learning stuck?

1:30-1:55 SILENT READING

SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Tuesday,February 7th, 2017

8:00-8:45 ART/PE

8:50-9:35 STEM

ESSAY SCHOLARSHIP WRITING

9.40-10.25 MATH/Practice B

Objectives: Practice converting between hours, minutes, seconds, years, months, weeks and days/ Practice solving word problems involving addition and subtraction

Teaching Strategies: Have students do Practice B, TB p. 124 Call on students to explain how they solve their problems. Provide and reteaching of concepts that may be necessary. Extra Practice: Exercise 2,.p 205-206

Tests: Tests 2A and 2B ,.p. 209-214

10.30-11.00 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00- 11:40 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 6 LESSON 9

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned?

Essential Background 10

Information or Terms

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Space Exploration

Poster 4 (Distant Galaxies);

Image Cards 24–28;

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Image Cards 27–29 15

Word Work: Triumph

What Have We Already Learned?

Show image 9A-1: Copernicus and the heliocentric view

Remind students that they learned about Nicolaus Copernicus in

the previous lesson. Ask students to share some key details from

Copernicus’s life, including why we remember and study about him

today. (He was a Polish astronomer, also a clergyman; he said that Earth

moved in space; he proposed the heliocentric idea that the sun—not

Earth—was at the center of the solar system; he opposed the geocentric

view that said that Earth was the center of the universe.)

Ask students to share how Copernicus was able to come to these

conclusions. (He studied the movement of the planets; he studied the

night sky; he used his mind and his logical thinking; he did mathematical

calculations; he studied Aristarchus’s ideas.)

Essential Background Information or Terms

Tell students that telescopes are only one way that astronomers learn

about the universe. Another way is through space exploration. Share with

students that space exploration also depends on astronauts and various

kinds of spacecraft to explore space in different ways.

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen closely to learn more about space exploration and

the different kinds of telescopes and spacecraft.

Comprehension Questions

1. [Show Image Card 29 (Sputnik 1) and Image Card 27

(Apollo 11).] Why are the Sputnik 1 and Apollo 11 trips into space

considered triumphs? (Sputnik 1 was the first satellite to be sent

into space; Apollo 11 was the first spacecraft to successfully take

astronauts to the moon.)

2. [Show Image Card 28 (Aldrin on the Moon; Armstrong in

the Reflection).] Describe Aldrin’s and Armstrong’s time on the moon.

What were some of the things they did and learned while there?

(They practiced walking, collected rock samples, took pictures, and

performed experiments. They learned that the soil on the moon is fine

and slippery, they brought back rocks that could be studied, and they

learned about the effects of gravity.)

3. Inferential [Show Image Card 27 (Apollo 11).] Describe the three

modules of Apollo 11 and the purpose of each. (The service module

on the top carried power, oxygen, and water; the command module

in the middle was called the Columbia, and it was the main part of

the spacecraft where the astronauts lived and traveled; the lunar

module on the bottom was called the Eagle, and it separated from the

Columbia to land on the moon.)

4. From its launch until its return to Earth, what effects did

gravity have on Apollo 11 and its astronauts? (Apollo 11 needed

powerful rockets to be launched in the opposite direction of Earth’s

gravitational pull; while on the moon, the astronauts had to learn to

move with less gravity; Apollo 11 was able to return to Earth with the

help of Earth’s gravity.)

5. What factors are important to consider when choosing

the site of an observatory? (Being high on a mountain reduces the

amount of distortion from the atmosphere; being far away from the

light pollution of cities provides darker skies.)

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

1:30- 1:55 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 6 LESSON 10

Lesson Number: 10

•Unit Lesson 6

Required Materials:

Worksheet 10.2 25

Remediation and

Enrichment

Remediate and Enrich Student

Knowledge choice of material

Objectives:Cause and Effect: Conjunction because

Worksheet 10.2

• Have students turn to Worksheet 10.2 and complete it independently.

Remediation and Enrichment

Remediate and Remediate and Enrich Student Knowledge

This block of time is set aside for you to provide remediation to students

who showed areas of need on the Mid-Year Assessment. For students

who do not need remediation, you may use this block of time for

enrichment.

Advance Preparation:

Instruction/Procedure:Remediation

• Information found in the Pausing Point

• The Pausing Point in this Teacher Guide lists specific grammar

and morphology skills and the lessons during which they were

first taught in Grade 3, followed by the Pausing Point worksheet

numbers.

• The Assessment and Remediation Guide

• You may choose to use this to remediate areas of letter-sound

correspondences as needed.

• Readers from Units 1–5

• You may choose to work with students in small groups to address

areas of need such as vocabulary and comprehension.

Enrichment

• Extension Activities from Units 1–5

• You may choose to have students complete extension activities

from previous units.

• Writing Prompts from Units 1–5

• You may choose to have students respond to writing prompts from

previous units.

• Additional Chapters and Worksheets from Units 1–5

• You may choose to have students read additional chapters and

complete accompanying worksheets from previous units.

• Reader’s Chair

• You may choose to have students do this in small groups or with

partners using any of the Readers from previous units.

• More Classic Tales and Worksheets

• You may choose to have students read selections from More

Classic Tales and complete the accompanying worksheets

Skill Check:

Writing Prompts from Units 1–5

Choose to have students respond to writing prompts from

previous units

Also, examine the dictated sentences for errors in capitalization and

punctuation

Notes/Reflection/Reminds: (Handwrite these in the box after you teach each lesson)

•Sample Questions. Please add your own and be reflective!

•How did the lesson go? What went well? With what did you struggle? What could have made the lesson better? Did the students understand? Who is still struggling? What do you need to change next year? How are you going to follow-up to make sure the learning stuck?

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )Remind students that they have learned two parts of speech—nouns and

verbs—and review them. (A noun names a person, place, or thing. A verb can

show action.)

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Wednesday February 8th, 2017

8:00- 8:45 MATH/Review 11

Objectives: Review concepts learned in Units 1-11

Materials: Appendix 11.r

Cards with years, months and corresponding number of months and likewise for weeks and days.

Teaching Strategies: Have students do Review 11, TB p. 125-126

You can do this in class as a class having students do the problems one at a time on individual marker boards and sharing their answers. Provide any reteaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Problem Solving: Give students copies of Appendix 11.r Allow students to work on the problems independently or in small groups. Discuss their solutions.

Practice: WB Review 11,.p. 141-145

Tests: Units 1-11, Cumulative Test A and B,.p. 215-226

8:50-9:35 GEOGRAPHY

9:40-10:25 DOMAIN

Writing a Narrative: Plan (Instructional Master 8B-1)

Explain to students that the read-aloud they heard today, “Nicolaus

Copernicus,” is considered a biography. Write the word biography on

chart paper, a chalkboard, or a whiteboard. As you write, be sure to

leave a space between the ‘o’ of bio and the ‘g’ of graphy. Tell students

that the word biography can be separated into parts. Circle the word

part bio–. Explain to students that bio– at the beginning of the word

biography means life, or pertaining to life. Write life below bio–. Explain

that in the middle of the word is the word part –graph, which means to

write. Write the word write below –graph. Ask students what they think a

biography is, given the definitions of the two parts of the word: bio– and

–graphy. Then, explain to students that a biography is a written account

of someone’s life. Often, biographies are written about people who have

achieved great things or changed other people’s minds in some way.

Explain to students that because a biography is written about a person

who actually existed, it is considered a form of nonfiction. Tell students

that some biographies are written in an informational style similar to

the pieces they wrote in the Classification of Animals and Light and

Sound domains, whereas other kinds of biographies are written more

like narratives, or stories, like the pieces they wrote in the Human Body:

Our Systems and Sense domain. Explain that even when a biography is

written in the form of a narrative, it always strives to remain true to what

actually happened to the person and is not made up from the author’s

imagination, such as a fictional narrative would be. Remind students that

The Wind in the Willows is a fictional narrative.

You may also wish to explain that biographies are only one form of

nonfiction narratives. Nonfiction narratives can also retell factual events

from history, such as the Apollo 11 mission when man first landed on the

moon.

Ask students what kind of information they think should be included in

a biography. You may wish to list students’ responses on chart papera chalkboard, or a whiteboard. Once students have had a chance to

respond, use the list below to fill in any gaps about what should be

included in a biography.

• date and place of birth and death

• major events in person’s life

• achievements

• impact the person had on society

Explain that a biography may often be divided into three sections: early

life, achievements, and the impact the person had on society, that is,

how this person changed the lives or thoughts of a society. Tell students

that together as a class, they are going to write a biography of Nicolaus

Copernicus. The biography will have at least three paragraphs—one for

the beginning of his life, one for his achievements, and one for the impact

he had on society.

Ask, “Who can tell me the steps of the writing process?” Review the

steps—plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish—and tell students that today

they will begin the first step of the biography together: plan. Remind

students that they have completed these steps while writing pieces in

other domains.

Copy Instructional Master 8B-1 onto chart paper, a chalkboard, or a

whiteboard. Tell students that they are going to fill out the brainstorming

chart together. Write “Nicolaus Copernicus” in the center of the oval.

Have students share facts about Nicolaus Copernicus. Record their ideas

in the smaller ovals coming off the spokes. You may wish to show Flip

Book images again, related to Copernicus and his life and contributions.

You may also wish to allow students to research Nicolaus Copernicus

further, using domain-related trade books from the classroom book tub

and/or other sources. If students include information that they find in

these sources in their writing piece, be sure to explain that they need

to write this information in their own words in order to avoid plagiarism.

Remind students that plagiarism is the act of taking other people’s work

exactly as it is written and using it as your own.

After students have completed the brainstorming chart, read through

each of the ideas in the smaller ovals, and have students classify each

one as “Early Life,” “Achievements,” or “Impact.” If one of the ideas

does not fit easily into one of those categories, label it as “Other,” and

explain to students that although this information does not fit readily into one of the three categories, they may still be able to use it to fill

out the biography, just as they may have added extra details to their

informational writing piece about an animal group in Classification of

Animals. Tell students that they will begin the draft stage together the

next time they meet to work on writing. Tell students to be thinking of a

title for this biography.

10:30-10:55 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:40 CKLA/LL Domain 6 LESSON 10

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned?

Essential Background 10

Information or Terms

Purpose for Listening Image Card 30

Presenting the Read-Aloud Mae Jemison

Image Card 24;

U.S. map; world map or

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Image Card 30 15

Word Work: Mission 5

What Have We Already Learned?

Remind students that in the last lesson they heard about the first

astronauts to walk on the moon. Have students describe what this

experience was like for the astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin.

(scary, exciting, etc.) Have students describe what this experience was

like for the people listening to the steps of their journey on Earth. (scary,

exciting, joyous, etc.) Reread Armstrong’s words, “That’s one small step

for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind!” Ask students, “What did his

words mean when he said them?

Essential Background Information or Terms

Review the term astronaut with students. Tell students that all astronauts

in the United States train with NASA. Ask students if they remember

what the letters in the acronym NASA stand for. (National Aeronautics

and Space Administration) Share that NASA is an organization that was

started to lead the scientific research and exploration of outer space.

Tell students that it was NASA that coordinated the Apollo 11 trip to

the moon, other manned flights into space, and many voyages of the

spacecraft that have taken pictures of the distant planets in our solar

system.

Purpose for Listening

Show students Image Card 30 (Mae Jemison) and tell them that Jemison

is a famous astronaut who worked for NASA. Tell students to find out

why Jemison is famous and in what year she traveled into space. Ask

students to listen for the many contributions Jemison has made during

her life.

Comprehension Questions

1. Literal [Show Image Card 30 (Mae Jemison).] Why is Mae Jemison

famous? (In 1992, she was the first African-American woman to

become an astronaut and travel into space.)

2. Inferential Describe Jemison’s mission as an astronaut. (She

traveled into space and lived on the Space Shuttle Endeavor for eight

days. She conducted many experiments about how weightlessness

affects plants and animals.)

3. Inferential What are some of the achievements Jemison had before

becoming an astronaut? (She graduated from school early, became

a doctor and studied engineering, joined the Peace Corps, helped

refugees, etc.)

4. NASA considers many applications for the astronaut

program. What kinds of characteristics and skills do you think made

Jemison a good candidate for NASA? (She had determination, strong

academics, a love of reading and science, was a doctor and an

engineer, had many degrees, etc.)

5. Why did NASA stop taking applications for new astronauts

for a period of time when Jemison was interested in joining NASA?

(There was a tragedy in the space program when the Space Shuttle

Challenger burst into flames. NASA stopped taking applications for

new astronauts for a while.)

6. Inferential What kind of international work did Jemison do to help

people around the world? (Jemison helped with a community

medicine project in Kenya; she helped care for Cambodian refugees

in Thailand; she was responsible for the healthcare of Peace Corps

volunteers in West Africa; she founded an international science

camp to help students learn to solve global problems; she started a

company to develop technologies to help planet Earth and the people

who live on it.)

7. Compare and contrast the lives of Nicolaus Copernicus

and Mae Jemison. (Answers may vary, but may include: Copernicus

was a white man; Jemison is an African-American woman.

Copernicus lived in the late 1400s and early 1500s; Jemison was

born in the mid-1900s and is still living. Copernicus had little use of

technology to make his observations; Jemison had the help of NASA

and its technology to conduct her observations and experiments.

Copernicus studied in Europe; Jemison traveled all over the world and

into space.)

nce

A.

At a Glance Exercise Materials

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

12:50-1:25 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 6 PAUSING POINT

Lesson Number:PAUSING POINT 1

Required Materials:WORKBOOK 6

Objectives:

Nouns, Verbs, and Adjectives

Subjects and Predicates

Practice Parts of Speech, Subjects and Predicates

Complete Sentences vs. Fragments

Sentences vs. Fragments

Advance Preparation:NO

Instruction/Procedure:• Worksheet PP1

• See Unit 2, Lesson 2

• Identify nouns, verbs, and adjectives in sentences

• Worksheet PP2

• See Unit 2, Lesson 4

• Separate subject and predicate

• Worksheet PP3

• See Unit 2, Lesson 5

• Separate subjects and predicates and identify nouns, verbs, and

adjectives in sentences

• Worksheet PP4

• See Unit 2, Lesson 7

• Identify sentences and fragments and correct fragments by adding

subjects or predicates

• Worksheet PP5

• See Unit 2, Lesson 7

• Identify sentences and fragments and correct fragments by adding

subjects or predicates

Skill Check:

Notes/Reflection/Reminds: (Handwrite these in the box after you teach each lesson)

•Sample Questions. Please add your own and be reflective!

•How did the lesson go? What went well? With what did you struggle? What could have made the lesson better? Did the students understand? Who is still struggling? What do you need to change next year? How are you going to follow-up to make sure the learning stuck?

rcise Materials Minutes

Ba

1:30-1:55 SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

8:00-8:45 STEM

Solar System Models

Materials: Poster 1; drawing paper, drawing tools

Tell students that before Copernicus discovered that Earth orbited the

sun, many people believed a theory by a man named Ptolemy. Ptolemy

said that Earth was at the center of the universe. Invite students to

draw Ptolemy’s geocentric solar system (with Earth in the center). Show

students Poster 1, and invite them to draw the solar system as we know it

today—and as Copernicus described it—with the sun in the center.

P

8:50-9:35 MATH /Geometry

Ch 1: Angles

Objectives: Identify angles in the environment, relate size of angle to the degree of turning, relate the number of angles to the number of sides in a polygon.

Materials: Stiff cards, folding meter, geo strips

Resources: TB: p. 127-129

WB: p. 146-147

EP: p. 211-212

Tests: p. 227-234

Ch2: Right Angles

Objectives: Identify right angles, classify angles as less than, equal to, greater than.

Materials: Rough paper, index cards, geostrips, clock

Resources: TB: p. 10-131

WB: p. 148-150

EP: p. 213-214

Tests: p. 235-242

Ch3: Quadrilaterals

Objectives: Recognize parallel lines and intersecting lines. Recognize and identify squares, rectangles, parallelogram, rhombus, equilateral, isosceles, and scalene triangles.

Resources: TB: p. 132-134

WB: p. 151-152

EP: p. 215-216

TEsts: p. 243-250

Ch4: Solid figures

Objectives: Review surfaces, vertices and edges. Review cube, rectangular prism, triangular prism, cylinder, sphere, rectangular pyramid, triangular pyramid.

Materials: Objects with curved and flat surfaces for example, tin can, dice, boxes cones

Resources: TB p. 135-136

WB: p. 153-154

EP: p. 217-218

TEsts: p. 251-258

9:40-10:25 DOMAIN IN CLASS ACTIVITIES

Sayings and Phrases: A Feather In Your Cap

An idiom is an expression whose meaning goes beyond the literal

meaning of its individual words. Idioms have been passed down orally

or quoted in literature and other printed text. Idioms often use figurative

language, meaning that what is stated is not literally taking place. It is

important to help your students understand the difference between the

literal meanings of the words and their implied or figurative meanings.

Ask students if they have ever heard someone say “a feather in your

cap.” Have students repeat the idiom. Ask students what a cap is. (hat)

Explain that this idiom refers to an accomplishment that is worthy of

praise. Memorizing all of the multiplication tables, for example, can be

a feather in your cap. This 17th-century idiom comes from an ancient

Native American and Asian custom. Warriors placed a feather in their

headgear for every enemy they defeated in battle.

Ask students, “In today’s read-aloud, which of Jemison’s

accomplishments could be seen as a feather in her cap? (becoming

a doctor and an engineer, serving in the Peace Corps, being the first

African-American female astronaut, etc.)

When Mae Jemison became the first African-American female in space,

someone could have told her, “That accomplishment is a feather in your

cap!” It used to be that only men with backgrounds as jet pilots were

considered for becoming astronauts with NASA, so Jemison broke many

boundaries as an African-American woman who worked hard to develop

herself as a scientist.

Ask students if they can think of a situation where they or someone else

they know has achieved an accomplishment that is a feather in their

cap. You may wish to share an example of your own. Try to find other

opportunities to use this saying in the classroom

Writing a Narrative: Draft/Revise (Instructional Masters 8B-1,

9B-1, 10B-1, and 10B-2)

Display the planning and drafting charts created as a class based on

Instructional Masters 8B-1 and 9B-1. Remind students that they have

completed the planning step of the writing process and that today they

are going to continue working on the drafting step together.

Read the draft of the biography to the class. Have students share any

additional ideas they may have for a title and/or subtitle and add these

to the list. Have students also share any other ideas they may have for a

new/different “hook.” Display this list of ideas.

Tell students that they are going to use a Revision Checklist to help them

know what other changes need to be made to the biography, just as they

did with their opinion and informational paragraphs. Remind students

that the word revise means change and is a substep of the drafting step.

Explain that writers often revise many, many times before they are able

to call their final manuscript “finished.” Remind students that revising

is different from editing: revising often includes making changes to the

content and/or the order of the content, whereas editing often includes

making corrections to grammar, punctuation, and spelling according to

the rules of standard English. Tell students that they will complete the

editing step the next time you meet to work on writing.

Copy Instructional Master 10B-1 onto chart paper, a chalkboard, or a

whiteboard. Read the Revision Checklist to students. Remind students

that in the opinion paragraph they wrote together in Classic Tales:

The Wind in the Willows, their supporting example sentences were in

chronological order because they followed the plot of the story. Tell

students that many biographies follow the events of a person’s life in

chronological order, but that sometimes a biography begins halfway

through the person’s life and then flashes back to the past, or moves

forward into the future.

You may wish to introduce/review the terms flashback and

foreshadowing if students grasp the concepts of the basic biography

and are ready for this variety/challenge, writing the sentences onto

strips and moving them around to see which order helps the narrative

flow best.

Once the class has decided upon the necessary revisions, tell students

that the last substep of the drafting step is to write a second draft of

the biography, incorporating the changes made during the revision

10:30-10:55 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:40 CKLA/LL Domain 6 PAUSING POINT 2 REVIEW

Students have now heard all of the read-alouds in the Astronomy: Our

Solar System and Beyond domain. It is highly recommended that you

pause here and spend two days reviewing, reinforcing, or extending the

material taught thus far.

You may have students do any combination of the activities listed below.

The activities may be done in any order. You may wish to do one activity

on successive days. You may also choose to do an activity with the

whole class or with a small group of students who would benefit from the

particular activity

Core Content REVIEW

Students will:

Identify the sun as a constant source of heat and light energy

Classify the sun as a star

Identify our planet Earth as the third planet from the sun and ideally

suited for life

Demonstrate how day and night on Earth are caused by Earth’s rotation

Explain why the sun seems to rise in the east and set in the west

Explain what happens during a solar eclipse and lunar eclipse

Explain the reasons for seasons

Describe the eight planets of our solar system and their sequence

from the sun

Identify our solar system as the sun and all of the smaller bodies that

orbit it, e.g., the planets, moons, asteroids, etc.

Describe the characteristics of a planet

Explain that Pluto has been reclassified as a dwarf planet

Describe the asteroid beltCompare and contrast asteroids, meteoroids, and comets

Describe stars as hot, distant, and made of gas

Describe the characteristics of stars

Compare and contrast our sun and other stars

Describe a galaxy as a very large cluster of many stars

Identify the Milky Way as our own galaxy and Andromeda as the

closest spiral galaxy in our universe

Describe the universe as a vast space that extends beyond the

imagination

Describe gravity

Describe the effects gravity has on Earth, within the solar system, and

in the universe

Explain what constellations are and how they are useful

Recognize and name important contellations

Describe tools and methods used to study space and share information

Identify and use vocabulary important to the process of science

Explain the Big Bang Theory as an important scientific theory of the

origin of the universe

Describe the life and contributions of Copernicus

Recall key details about the history of space exploration, e.g.,

Galileo’s invention of the telescope, Sputnik 1, Apollo 11, and the

Hubble Space Telescope

Describe the life and contributions of astronaut Mae Jemison

Writing a Narrative: Edit/Final Copy

Materials: Instructional Masters 8B-1, 10B-2, PP2-1, and PP2-2

Display the plan and drafts created as a class based on Instructional

Masters 8B-1 and 10B-2. Remind students that they have completed

the planning and drafting steps of the writing process together and that

today they are going to complete the editing step. Tell students that this

is also the time to decide on a final titleTell students that they are going to use an Editing Checklist to help them

know if any further corrections are needed. Remind students that writers

often edit their drafts many, many times before they are able to call their

manuscripts “finished.” Remind students that editing is different from

revising; revising often includes making changes to the content and/

or order of content, whereas editing often includes making corrections

to grammar, punctuation, and spelling to follow the rules of standard

English.

Copy Instructional Master PP2-1 onto chart paper, a chalkboard, or a

whiteboard. Read the Editing Checklist to the class. Have students refer

to the most recent draft of the narrative and discuss any necessary edits

to grammar, punctuation, or spelling. As you make corrections to the

draft and check off the items on the checklist, you may wish to model

basic proofreading marks for students.

Tell students that after editing and deciding on a title, the last substep

before publishing the biography is to create a final copy. You may wish to

type this final copy, modeling for students keyboarding skills, including

spellcheck, dictionary, and thesaurus functions.

Writing a Narrative: Publish

Materials: Instructional Master PP2-2

Remind students that they have completed the editing step of the writing

process, including the substep of creating the final copy. Display this finalcopy based on Instructional Master PP2-2, and tell students that they will

now complete the publishing step of the writing process. Explain that this

means they will create a presentation of their biography to share.

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

12:50-1:25 CKLA SKILLS PAUSING POINT 2

Lesson Number PAUSING POINT

Required Materials:WORKBOOK 6

Objectives:

Change Fragments and Run-On Sentences into Simple

Sentences

Grammar Review

Write Compound Sentences

Identify Topic and Concluding Sentences

Organize a Paragraph

Write Topic and Concluding Sentences

Instruction/Procedure:• Worksheet PP11

• See Unit 3, Lesson 5

• Create a topic and concluding sentence for groups of sentences to

form paragraphs• Worksheet PP6

• See Unit 2, Lesson 8

• Add subjects or predicates to make simple sentences and split run-on

sentences into simple sentences Worksheet PP7

• See Unit 2

• Review prior grammar concepts• Worksheet PP8

• See Unit 2, Lesson 14

• Add subjects or predicates to make compound sentences Worksheet PP9

• See Unit 3, Lesson 2

• Identify topic and concluding sentences in paragraphs • Worksheet PP10

• See Unit 3, Lesson 3

• Sequence sentences into a paragraph

Skill Check:

Notes/Reflection/Reminds: (Handwrite these in the box after you teach each lesson)

•Sample Questions. Please add your own and be reflective!

•How did the lesson go? What went well? With what did you struggle? What could have made the lesson better? Did the students understand? Who is still struggling? What do you need to change next year? How are you going to follow-up to make sure the learning stuck?

1:30-1:55 SILENT READING

SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Friday ,February 10th, 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials MUSIC/DRAMA

P

8:50-9:35 Math/Geometry /Angles

Objectives: Identify angles in the environment/ relate size of angle to the degree of turning, relate the number of angles to the number of sides in a polygon.

Materials: Stiff Cards/folding meter sticks/ geostrips

Teaching Strategies: Hand each student a stiff card or two geostrips attached at one end or a folding stick meter . Tell students to make an angle with their cards, folding meter stick, geo strips. Open the folding meter stick a little and trace the angle on the board. Tell students that an angle is formed when two straight lines meet at a point. Have students do problem in TB p. 127 Have students look around the class to find angles to measure. Give students ample time to do so. Ask students to name some other objects outside the classroom that contains angles. Have students refer to task 1 TB p. 128, for some examples of angles of objects outside the class. Ask students what have they noticed about the angles as they pull one side of the folding meter stick or geo strip apart. Tell students that the larger the angle, the more one side has to be turned away from the other side. Have students to work in pairs to locate angles in the class. Hand each pair a sheet Appendix 12.1A Draw or display on the board afterwards 1 rectangle, i triangle, 1 octagon, 1 hexagon, and 1 pentagon. Sk students to name these shapes. Ask students supply the answer, write it down below each shape. Tell students to draw 3 polygons on their own. Remind them that the figures must be closed and the lines must be straight and they meet to form angles. Give students ample time to draw and have them share their shapes with the class.

Assess: Have students do tasks 2-6, TB p. 128-129

Practice: WB Exercise 1,.p. 211-212

Extra Practice: Ex 1,.p. 211-212

Tests: 1A and 1B,.p. 227-234

9:40-10:25 DOMAIN IN CLASS ACTIVITIES

Image Review

Show the Flip Book images from any read-aloud again, and have

students retell the read-aloud using the images.

Image Card Review

Materials: Image Cards 1–30

In your hand, hold Image Cards 1–30 fanned out like a deck of cards. Ask

a student to choose a card but to not show it to anyone else in the class.

The student must then perform an action or give a clue about the picture

s/he is holding. For example, for Mae Jemison, a student may pretend to

practice medicine or say, “I founded an international space camp to use

science and technology to help solve world problems.” The rest of the

class will guess what person is being described. Proceed to another card

when the correct answer has been given.

Domain-Related Trade Book or Student Choice

Materials: Trade book

Read an additional trade book to review a particular concept; refer to

the books listed in the introduction. You may also choose to have the

students select a read-aloud to be heard again.

If students listen to a read-aloud a second time, you may wish to have

them take notes about a particular topic. Be sure to guide them in this

important method of gathering information. You may wish to model how

to take notes, construct an outline, etc.

Key Vocabulary Brainstorming

Materials: Chart paper, chalkboard, or whiteboard

Give the students a key domain concept or vocabulary word such as

Big Bang Theory or stars. Have them brainstorm everything that comes

to mind when they hear the word, such as, theory of the beginning of

the universe, constellations, Orion, etc. Record their responses on chart

paper, a chalkboard, or a whiteboard for reference.

You may also wish to have students do this brainstorming acitvity

individually or with a partner. Multiple-Meaning Word Activity: Conducted

Materials: Chart paper, chalkboard, or whiteboard; images

depicting the various meanings of the word conducted

1. In the read-aloud “Mae Jemison,” you heard the word conducted in

this sentence about Jemison: “She lived on the Endeavour for eight

days and conducted many experiments while she was there.”

2. With your neighbor, think of and discuss as many meanings for

the word conducted as you can. [Give students a few minutes to

brainstorm and discuss. You may wish to encourage them to jot down

their ideas.]

3. [Create three columns on chart paper, a chalkboard, or a whiteboard.

Write the letter ‘A’ at the top of the first column. Now ask a volunteer

to come up with a definition for the word conducted as it occurred in

the read-aloud. Write “carried out or made something happen” next to

the ‘A.’]

4. [Ask a volunteer to share a different meaning of conducted that may

have emerged from their discussions; guide students to the second

meaning for conducted. Write the letter ‘B’ at the top of the second

columns, and add the definition “directed or led” beside it.]

5. [Ask if anyone came up with a third different meaning for conducted;

guide the discussion to the third meaning. Write the letter ‘C’ at the

top of the third column, and add the definition “served as a route/path

or direction for, as for electricity.”]

6. [Read the following sentences one at a time. At the end of each

sentence, have students indicate which column the sentence belongs

in according to the meaning for conducted, and write it on chart

paper, a chalkboard, or whiteboard in the correct column.]

• Terry Ann conducted the orchestra for her school’s spring musical.

(B)

• Electricity cannot be conducted through rubber, so a safe place

during a lightning storm is in a car. (C)

• Mr. Lee’s class conducted a survey to find out which piece of

playground equipment was most commonly used. (A)

• The mother duck conducted her ducklings through the rippling

stream, seemingly to avoid the waterfall. (B)

• The soapstone floor under Sandy’s wood stove conducted heat,

which warmed the entire room. (C)

• The marching band played their instruments together beautifully as

Minna conducted them with precision. (B)

• Judge Vance conducted the trial with fairness and compassion. (A)

Class Book: Astronomy: Our Solar System and Beyond

Materials: Drawing paper, drawing tools

Tell the class or a group of students that they are going to add to the

class book to help them remember what they have learned in this

domain. Have the students brainstorm important information about the

Big Bang Theory, stars and constellations, space exploration, Nicolaus

Copernicus, and Mae Jemison. Have each student choose one idea to

draw a picture of and ask him or her to write a caption for the picture.

Bind the pages to make a book to put in the class library for students to

read again and again.

Venn Diagram

Materials: Instructional Master PP2-3; chart paper, chalkboard, or

whiteboard

Tell students that together you are going to compare and contrast two

things students have learned about during Astronomy: Our Solar System

and Beyond by asking how they are similar and how they are different.

Use Instructional Master PP2-3 to list two things at the top of the diagram

and then to capture information provided by students. Choose from the

following list or create a pair of your own:

• Galileo and Aristotle

• Aristarchus and Aristotle

• Jemison and Armstrong

10:30-10:55 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:40 CKLA/LL Domain 6 ASSESSMENT

Domain Assessment

Part I (Instructional Master DA-1)

Directions: Use the names in the box to fill in the names of some of the

objects in our solar system.

1. Mercury

2. Venus

3. Earth

4. Mars

5. Asteroid Belt

6. Jupiter

7. Saturn

8. Uranus

9. Neptune

Part II (Instructional Master DA-2)

Directions: Read each question and the optional answers with your

teacher. Circle the letter that best answers each question or completes

each statement.

1. Why do the seasons change? (B)

2. Which is the name of our galaxy? (D)

3. Stars are . (C)

4. Which are objects found in our solar system? (D)

5. During a solar eclipse, the moon moves between the sun and Earth

and . (A)

6. Which is not true of gravity? (C)

Part III (Instructional Master DA-3)

Directions: Write one or two sentences to answer each question.

1. Who was Nicolaus Copernicus, and how did he challenge how people

thought about the universe?

2. Who was Mae Jemison? What are some words you can use to

describe her and why?

3. How was the Apollo 11 mission important to astronomy and space

exploration?

4. What is a theory? What is the Big Bang theory?

5. What are some ways that scientists study space? What are some

questions you would like scientists to answer?

Writing Prompts

Students may be given an additional writing prompt such as the

following:

• Nicolaus Copernicus’s theory was remarkable because . . .

• The most interesting thing about Mae Jemison is . . .

• Some of the ways that astronomers study space are . . .

• If I were an astronomer, I would study because . . .

Describe an experiment you would like to perform if you had a chance

to go to the moon or orbit the earth in a spaceship.

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

12:50-1:25 CKLA SKILLS REVIEW

Unit Lesson

Required Materials:WORKBOOK 6 PP WORKSHEETS

Objectives:

Quotation Marks

Adverbs that Tell when and where

Build Sentences

Conjunction but

Morphology

Prefix un– Prefix non– Prefix re– Prefix pre– Prefixes re– and pre–,mis,dis

Prefixes dis– and mis– Suffix –er,or,ist,ian,al,ly,ous

Advance Preparation:COPIES

Instruction/Procedure:

• Worksheet PP22

• See Unit 4, Lessons 17 and 19

• Rewrite sentences using quotation marks

• Worksheet PP23

• See Unit 5, Lesson 4

• Identify adverbs and use them in sentences

• Worksheet PP24

• See Unit 5, Lessons 7 and 8

• Add adjectives, adverbs, and synonyms to create longer, more

interesting sentences

• Worksheet PP25

• See Unit 5, Lesson 14

• Apply knowledge of conjunction but

• Worksheet PP26

• See Unit 2, Lesson 3

• Choose from the root word and affixed word to complete the

sentence; add prefix to root word to make a new word

• Worksheet PP27

• See Unit 2, Lesson 3

• Choose from the root word and affixed word to complete the

sentence; add prefix to root word to make a new

• Worksheet PP28

• See Unit 2, Lesson 4

• Write sentences using affixed words

• Worksheet PP29

• See Unit 2, Lesson 8

• Match the affixed word to its meaning; choose the correct affixed

word to complete the sentence

• Worksheet PP30

• See Unit 2, Lesson 8

• Use clues to choose the correct affixed words to complete the

crossword puzzle

• Worksheet PP31

• See Unit 2, Lesson 9

• Choose from the root word and affixed word or two affixed words to

complete the sentence; write a sentence using the affixed word

• Worksheet PP32

• See Unit 3, Lesson 3

• Determine if the sentence using the affixed word shows an example of

the correct meaning of the word; write your own example showing the

correct meaning of the affixed work

• Worksheet PP33

• See Unit 3, Lesson 3

• Replace the meaning with the affixed word in a sentence and write

the word, part of speech, and prefix • Worksheet PP34

• See Unit 3, Lesson 4

• Choose between root word and affixed word or two affixed words

to complete the sentence; write the part of speech, root word, and

meaning for the affixed word

• Worksheet PP35

• See Unit 4, Lesson 3

• Match the affixed word to its meaning; write a sentence using the

affixed word

• Worksheet PP36

• See Unit 4, Lesson 3

• Use clues to choose the correct affixed words to complete the

crossword puzzle

• Worksheet PP37

• See Unit 4, Lesson 4

• Add the appropriate suffix to the root word to complete the sentence;

write the affixed word

• Worksheet PP38

• See Unit 4, Lesson 8

• Choose from the root word and affixed word to complete the

sentence; add prefix to root word to make a new word

• Worksheet PP39

• See Unit 4, Lesson 8

• Choose the root word or affixed word to complete the sentence; write

a sentence using the affixed word • Worksheet PP40

• See Unit 4, Lesson 9

• Answer questions by choosing the correct affixed word

• Worksheet PP41

• See Unit 4, Lesson 13

• Match the affixed word to its meaning; choose the correct affixed

word to complete the sentence

• Worksheet PP41

• Determine if the sentence using the affixed word shows an example of

the correct meaning of the word; write your own example showing the

correct meaning of the affixed word

• Worksheet PP42

• See Unit 4, Lesson 14

• Write sentences using affixed words

• Worksheet PP43

• See Unit 5, Lesson 8

• Choose between root word and affixed word or two affixed words

to complete the sentence; write the part of speech, root word, and

meaning for the affixed word

• Worksheet PP44

• See Unit 5, Lesson 8

• Add suffix to a word to create a new word to complete the sentence;

write a sentence using the verb and affixed word given

Supplemental Materials:

•How are you using these materials in your instruction?

Skill Check:

Notes/Reflection/Reminds: (Handwrite these in the box after you teach each lesson)

•Sample Questions. Please add your own and be reflective!

•How did the lesson go? What went well? With what did you struggle? What could have made the lesson better? Did the students understand? Who is still struggling? What do you need to change next year? How are you going to follow-up to make sure the learning stuck?

1:30-1:55 SILENT READING

SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up