LESSON PLANS FEB 27-MAR 3RD

Monday , February 27, 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials PE/ART

8:50-9:35 Math

Math/Capacity/Liters/Milliliters

Materials

1 liter beaker or measuring cup

Water preferably color

Various containers of different sizes

Basin

Teaspoon

Paper cups

Bucket

A big bottle

Learning Objectives

After finishing the lesson, students will be able to define and determine the Capacity, Liters and Milliliters units of measurements.

Lesson

Show students a liter beaker or measuring cup.

Pour water to the 1 liter line. Tell students that the amount of water in the beaker is 1 liter. The liter is a standard unit of measurement. Show students various containers filled with water. Tell students that the capacity of the container is the amount of liquid it can hold. Ask students the following questions:

-Is the capacity of each of the containers about 1 liter?

-Is it greater than a liter or less than a liter?

Ask students how to measure the extra amount of water in the beakers with capacity greater than a liter. Tell students that they need to use a smaller measuring scale. Amounts of water less than 1 liter are measured in milliliters.

Show students a teaspoon. Tell students that a teaspoon can hold about 5 milliliters of water. Show students medicine spoons or plastic 10 ml graduated cylinders if you have them. Show them a centimeter cube. Show the 1 liter beaker and give one to each group. ASk students to look at the markings on the beaker. Ask them how many divisions there are in 1 liter (10 100 ml divisions)

Ask students how many ml there are in 1 liter. Tell the students that there are 1000 ml in 1 liter. Write on board 1 l=1000ml Show students 500ml and 200ml beakers

Pour water into the beakers and have students read the amount of water in ml

Help students by asking the following:

-How many divisions are there?

-What is the value of each division?

-Which is the closest 100ml mark to the water levels?

-Which division is the water level on?

Show students smaller containers that hold less than 1 liter, filled. Ask students how much water they think is in each of the containers. Pour the water from the containers, one at a time, into the breakers/measuring cup to see if the estimates are correct. Repeat the process with a different amount a few times.

Divide students into groups. Hand out Appendix 8.1a to each group Show the following to students

Capacity/Liters/Milliliters

Materials

1 liter beaker or measuring cup

Water preferably color

Various containers of different sizes

Basin

Teaspoon

Paper cups

Bucket

A big bottle

Learning Objectives

After finishing the lesson, students will be able to define and determine the Capacity, Liters and Milliliters units of measurements.

Lesson

Show students a liter beaker or measuring cup.

Pour water to the 1 liter line. Tell students that the amount of water in the beaker is 1 liter. The liter is a standard unit of measurement. Show students various containers filled with water. Tell students that the capacity of the container is the amount of liquid it can hold. Ask students the following questions:

-Is the capacity of each of the containers about 1 liter?

-Is it greater than a liter or less than a liter?

Ask students how to measure the extra amount of water in the beakers with capacity greater than a liter. Tell students that they need to use a smaller measuring scale. Amounts of water less than 1 liter are measured in milliliters.

Show students a teaspoon. Tell students that a teaspoon can hold about 5 milliliters of water. Show students medicine spoons or plastic 10 ml graduated cylinders if you have them. Show them a centimeter cube. Show the 1 liter beaker and give one to each group. ASk students to look at the markings on the beaker. Ask them how many divisions there are in 1 liter (10 100 ml divisions)

Ask students how many ml there are in 1 liter. Tell the students that there are 1000 ml in 1 liter. Write on board 1 l=1000ml Show students 500ml and 200ml beakers

Pour water into the beakers and have students read the amount of water in ml

Help students by asking the following:

-How many divisions are there?

-What is the value of each division?

-Which is the closest 100ml mark to the water levels?

-Which division is the water level on?

Show students smaller containers that hold less than 1 liter, filled. Ask students how much water they think is in each of the containers. Pour the water from the containers, one at a time, into the breakers/measuring cup to see if the estimates are correct. Repeat the process with a different amount a few times.

Divide students into groups. Hand out Appendix 8.1a to each group Show the following to students

-A bucket

-A basin

-A big bottle

-3 smaller containers with a capacity less than a liter

-A teaspoon

-A papercup

Have students do tasks 1-8, TB p. 49-52

Assess: Have students do tasks 9, TB p. 52

Practice: WB 1,p. 49-50

9:40-10:25 DOMAIN IN CLASS ACTIVITIES

Regions and Cultures Organizer (Instructional Master 8B-1)

Give each student a copy of Instructional Master 8B-1. Have them fill in

the information pertaining to the region, dwellings, food sources, and

other aspects of the Inuit. Have students choose one or two items from

the read-aloud to illustrate on the back of the worksheet. You may wish to

have some students write a few additional sentences to accompany their

drawings. As students share their writing and drawings with a partner or

with the class, encourage them to use domain-related vocabulary.

Note: You may choose to copy this chart onto chart paper, a

chalkboard, or a whiteboard and display Image Card 18 (Dwellings

of the Thule and Inuit) along with words, phrases, and/or drawings

related to this group of Native Americans.

Cultural Identity Chart (Instructional Master 8B-2)

Begin by displaying Image Cards 13–18 to review dwellings, and Image

Cards 19–30 to review other aspects of the cultural practices and beliefs of

each group within each region.

Next, tell students that they will be using the charts they created at the

end of Lessons 3 through 7, and the completed Instructional Master 8B-1,

to compile that information on one chart (Instructional Master 8B-2). You

may wish to have students complete Instructional Master 8B-2 individually,

in groups, or as a class. You may wish to recreate the chart contained in

Instructional Master 8B-2 on a piece of chart paper, a chalkboard, or a

whiteboard to record student responses.

10:30-10:55 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:40 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 8 LESSON 9

PAUSING POINT

DOMAIN OBJECTIVIES

Students will:

Locate the continents of North America, South America, and Asia on

a map

Locate the Bering Strait on a map, and explain that during the Ice

Age, this region was an exposed land mass known as Beringia that

connected Asia to North America

Explain how and why nomadic hunters migrated from Asia to North

America

Explain that the ways Native Americans obtained food evolved over

time to include hunting, gathering, and in some areas, fishing and

farming

Explain that Native Americans spread out across North and South

America in search of food and eventually developed different

languages and cultures Describe the importance of trade in the development of farming

techniques

Explain how Native Americans adapted to their environments and how

these environments contributed to their cultural identity

Describe the way in which Native Americans handed down their

history from one generation to another

Explain why native people came to be called “Indians”

Explain that Native Americans still live throughout North America

Locate regions in North America where Native Americans lived, and

describe the physical characteristics of those regions

Identify three of the groups of Native Americans that are referred to as

Mound Builders

Explain how and why mounds throughout eastern North America

were built by different groups of people at different times and that

many are still visible today

Describe the various food sources and dwellings of Native Americans

as related to their environment

Locate on a map of North America the Mississippi River and

surrounding areas where the Mound Builders lived

List three of the groups of Native Americans that are referred to as

Mound Builders: Adena, Hopewell, and Mississippian

Explain that the Native Americans of the Southwest region developed

ways of channeling water from rivers to their fields

Explain that the Ancestral Pueblo became known for their stonework,

basket weaving, and pottery making

Describe some characteristics of Native American cultures, including

religious beliefs

Explain that the Ancestral Pueblo left their homes quite suddenly,

migrated to new areas in the same region, and established new

settlements, some of which still exist today

Identify some tribes of the Southwest as including the Hopi, Zuni,

Diné (Navajo), and Apache

Describe kachinas and their significant to the Hopi culture Explain the significance of the winter and summer solstices to the

Hopi culture

Identify the tribal names of some of the Native Americans of the

Eastern Woodlands, including the Iroquois, Mohican, and Powhatan

Explain why the Iroquois nation was formed

Explain that many families in the Northeast region lived together in a

longhouse and that a young married couple would live with the wife’s

family

Explain that corn, beans, and squash were very important to many

Native Americans and are referred to as the “three sisters”

Describe wampum and its significance in the Iroquois cultures

Describe the roles and areas of authority of both men and women in

Cherokee society

Explain why the Southeast was the most densely populated region

Identify the Thule people as the group with which the Inuit merged

Explain the importance of domesticated animals in Native American

Cultures

Image Review

Show the images from any read-aloud again, and have students retell the

read-aloud using the images.

Image Card Review

Materials: Image Cards 1–30

On a surface, spread out Image Cards 1–30 fanned out like a deck of

cards. Ask a student to choose a card but to not show it to anyone else

in the class. The student must then give a clue about the picture s/he is

holding. For example, for a buffalo, a student may say, “I am also known

as a bison, and I am one of the few prehistoric animals still in existence

today.” The rest of the class will guess what is being described. Proceed

to another card when the correct answer has been given.

Geography Review

Materials: Posters 1 and 2; world map or globe

Have students locate the geographic areas discussed in this domain:

Asia, Beringia, Bering Strait, North America, South America, and the five

regions of North America. Also, have a volunteer point out the Mississippi

River.

Writing Prompts

Students may be given an additional writing prompt such as the

following:

• You heard that Native American tribes developed a way of life that

was heavily influenced by the climate and the environment in which

they lived. How are you affected by your climate and environment?

• Can you think of examples that show how we care for the earth, and

examples that show how we don’t?

• Being a member of a tribe is somewhat similar to being a member

of a community. Every country has its own culture. Can you think of

things that represent our classroom or school community?

• Do you know of any Native American tribes that live in our state? [You

may wish to have students conduct research to answer this question

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

12:50-1:25 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 7

Lesson Number:9

Required Materials:board or chart paper;

Worksheets 9.2, Vocabulary Cards;

Worksheet 9.1 Worksheet 9.3 Worksheet 9.4

Objectives:

Reading Time Small Group Partner Reading: “A

Walk on the Moon”

What’s in Our Universe?;

Grammar Review Quotation Marks and

Conjunctions

Morphology Practice Suffixes –ous, –ive, –ly,

–ful, and –less

Spelling Word Sort

Take-Home Material “A Walk on the Moon” Worksheet 9.5

Advance Preparation:

Write these sentences on the board or chart paper to be used in the

Grammar lesson:

Bob said, “He eats bananas every day.”

“He eats bananas every day,” said Bob.

“That building is on fire!” exclaimed Mrs. White.

“Should we call the fire department?” she asked.

Mrs. White exclaimed, “That building is on fire!”

She asked, “Should we call the fire department?”

Instruction/Procedure:

Small Group Partner Reading: “A Walk on the Moon”

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that today, they will partner read the chapter called “A

Walk on the Moon.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter.

• Ask students to make predictions about what they think astronauts

found on the moon and/or what it was like.

Review Quotation Marks and Conjunctions

• Draw students’ attention to the quotation marks poster you displayed

in advance.

Quotation Marks

Quotation Marks are punctuation marks used to show exactly

what person says or has said.

• Have a student read it aloud to the class.

• Read and review the first two sentences you wrote on the board in

advance, pointing out quotation marks, commas, capital letters, and

end punctuation

Practice Suffixes –ous, –ive, –ly, –ful, and –less

Worksheet 9.3

• Review the meaning of the following suffixes:

• –ous means “full of”

• –ive means “relating to”

• –ly means “in a way”

• –ful means “full of”

• –less means “lacking”

• Tell students you will read a sentence that uses a word with one of the

suffixes they are reviewing. Students must determine if the sentence

demonstrates an example of the correct meaning of the word.

Word Sort

• Tell students they will sort words using /n/ spelled ‘n’, ‘nn’, ‘kn’, and ‘gn’.

• Have students turn to Worksheet 9.4.

• Ask students to identify the vowel patterns. (‘n’ > /n/, ‘nn’ > /n/,

‘gn’ > /n/, and ‘kn’ > /n/)

• Have students independently read the words in the box below the

headers and circle the consonants that have the /n/ sound

Supplemental Materials:NONE

Skill Check:

Ask students to comment on the predictions they made about the

chapter before they read it.

• Review answers to Worksheets with students.

Notes/Reflection/Reminds: (Handwrite these in the box after you teach each lesson)

•Sample Questions. Please add your own and be reflective!

•How did the lesson go? What went well? With what did you struggle? What could have made the lesson better? Did the students understand? Who is still struggling? What do you need to change next year? How are you going to follow-up to make sure the learning stuck?

1:30-1:55 SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Tuesday,February 28th, 2017

8:00-8:45 ART

8:50-9:35 STEM

9.40-10.25 MATH

CUPS-GALLONS

Students will:

1.Understand that standard measures can be used to describe capacity.

2.Order cup, pint, quart, and gallon from smallest to largest.

3.Understand that different measures can be used to describe capacity.

Materials:Materials:

•paper cups for Day 1 measuring activity and Day 5 soup-tasting

•Chart paper and marker

Drawing paper, markers, lined paper, pencils

Lesson Procedure:

1.Divide students into small groups. Distribute plastic containers of different sizes and paper “measuring” cups, one of each per group. Have each group determine the capacity of its container. Share the results.

: Units of Measurement – Show students several cups of different sizes. Explain that if they were expecting a super-sized cup filled with their favorite beverage, they might be disappointed to find out they were getting a tiny one. Scientists solve this problem by agreeing on standard units of measurement. Show students a standard-sized measuring cup.

1.Continue playing the Cups, Quarts, Pints, Gallons movie, beginning at ‘What is a cup?’ and continue as the cup and pint are shown. Stop before equivalents are revealed.

2.Explain that a pint is another standard unit of measurement. Show students a cup and a pint measure. Ask them to guess how many cups it would take to fill a pint. Ask how they could find out for sure.

3.Explain that you will choose a small group of students to be Secret Scientists. Their job will be to test their hypothesis by using the cup measure to fill up the pint measure. You will ask students to put their heads down, then give a sticky

4.note to each Secret Scientist. Each will take a turn measuring (out of view of the rest of the class), and use their sticky note to tally the number of cups that it takes to fill a pint. At the appointed time, you will ask all Secret Scientists to reveal their findings. Record the results on chart paper: 1 pint (pt) = 2 cups (c).

5.Assign students to bring one cup containers from home as examples to share with the class. Clarify that they should not bring glass containers or perishable foods.

6.Equivalents – Share the one cup examples students brought from home and discuss.

Speculate about situations in which cups and pints would be too small to be useful. For example, you wouldn’t want to measure the amount of water in a swimming pool in cups–you’d be counting forever!

1.Show a quart bottle, and ask: How many cups might a quart contain? How many pints? Call on students to demonstrate by filling containers in front of the class. Add these equivalents to the chart: 1 quart (qt) = 2 pints, 1 quart (qt) = 4 cups.

2.Show a plastic gallon jug. Assign Secret Scientists to determine gallon equivalents, if desired. (Some can find equivalents using cups, some can use pints, and some can use quarts.)

Play the remainder of the movie, starting with the discussion of gallons that begins with Moby at the refrigerator. Add the following equivalents to the chart: 1 gallon (gal) = 4 quarts, 1 gallon (gal) = 8 pints, 1 gallon (gal) = 16 cups

10.30-11.00 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00- 11:40 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 8 ASSESSMENT

Domain Assessment

Note: You may wish to have some students do the three parts of

this assessment in two or three sittings. Some students may need

help reading the questions. You may wish to allow some students to

respond orally.

Part I (Instructional Master DA-1)

Directions: Look at the numbers on the map. Then, look at the words in

the word bank. Write the number on the blank beside the correct word.

Finally, draw the route on the map that the earliest known people used to

migrate to North America.

Part II (Instructional Master DA-2)

Directions: Let’s read the following questions and statements together.

Circle the letter that best answers the question or completes the

statement.

1. Why did the early Native Americans travel to the continent that is now

known as North America? (B—to follow the herds they hunted)

2. What term refers to someone or something that existed before people

started writing down history? (C—prehistoric)

3. Which of the following was NOT one of the Mound Builder tribes? (A—

Cherokee)

4. What was one of the biggest challenges faced by the tribes of the

Southwest region as they adapted to their environment? (C—not

always enough water)

5. What was the name for the underground rooms used by the Ancestral

Pueblo for religious ceremonies? (D—kivas)

6. After the Ancestral Pueblo abandoned their homes, they began to live

in . (A—cliff dwellings) 7. The Hopi planted many different crops, but which crop was the most

important to them? (D—corn)

8. The “Hopi Way” refers to which of the following? (A—the belief

that they should be kind to one another and thoughtful toward the

environment)

9. The Eastern Woodlands tribes built three types of homes to survive

the cold, snowy winters. Which are two types of houses used by the

Eastern Woodlands tribes? (A—longhouses and wigwams)

10. Like many Native American tribes, when the tribes of the Southeast

began to farm, they also continued to do which of the following

activities? (D—all of the above, i.e., hunt, gather, and fish)

11. Why was the Southeast region the most densely populated when

the European explorers first arrived on North America? (A—The

mild climate enabled the Native Americans to grow two main crops

each year, providing an abundance of food to support a growing

population.)

12. What was one of the main sources of food for the Inuit? (B—whales)

Part III (Instructional Master DA-3) Directions: Read along as I read each sentence. Write one or two

complete sentences to respond to each question or statement.

1. How were the earliest known inhabitants of North America able to

migrate from Asia?

2. How did the ways of gathering food change over time for some Native

Americans?

3. Why did the Native American tribes of the Greater Mississippi River

Areas build mounds?

4. Compare and contrast two tribes and their regions that you have

learned about.

5. What were some of the things the Hopi asked the kachinas to give

them?

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

1:30- 1:55 CKLA SKILLS

Lesson Number:

•Unit Lesson

Required Materials:Worksheets Workbook 10.2 10.3, 10.4; dice;

game markers

Worksheet 10.5

Objectives:

Spelling Spelling Assessment Worksheet 10.1;

Reading TIme Whole Group Silent: “What’s it

Like in Space?”

What’s in Our Universe?;

Grammar Match Me if You Can Spelling Practice Dictionary Skills

Advance Preparation:

Instruction/Procedure:

wwSpelling Assessment

Worksheet 10.1

• Have students turn to Worksheet 10.1 for the spelling assessment.

• If you would like for students to have pens, this is the time to pass

them out.

• Tell students that for this assessment, they will write their words under

the header to which they belong. For example, if you call out the word

net, they would write that word under the header ‘n’ > /n/.

• Tell students that should a spelling word fit under more than one

header, they should only write the word under one.

• Tell students that they may not have to use all the lines under each

header.

• Using the chart below, call out the word using the following format:

say the word, use it in a sentence, and say the word once more.

1. nearby

2. gnat

3. recently

4. knotted

5. knowledge

6. knighted

7. understand

8. design

9. knobby

10. gnarly

11. skinny

12. manned

13. flannel

14. campaign

15. channel

16. annoy

17. knuckle

18. Challenge Word: very

19. Challenge Word: vary

20. Challenge Word: enough

Content Word: astronomer

Whole Group Silent: “What’s it Like in Space?”

Worksheet 10.2

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that today they will be reading “What’s it Like in Space?.”

• Have students share facts from previous chapters about space.

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter.

• Tell students that today, they will read the chapter to themselves

independently.

Match Me if You Can

Worksheets 10.3, 10.4

• Tell students they will once again play Match Me if You Can.

• Have students pair up and have one student tear out Worksheet 10.3

(game board). Pairs of students should combine the game cards

(Worksheet 10.4) they cut apart during Lesson 9 and place them face

down near the game board.

• Have students follow these rules to play:

1. Begin at ‘Start’.

2. Draw a card, read the sentence aloud, and say whether the

punctuation (quotation marks, commas, end punctuation) used

in the sentence is correct or incorrect.

3. If your sentence is incorrect, tell the others playing the game

what is incorrect about it and how you would correct it.

4. Roll a die and count each direction to see on which square

you wish to land to match your card to the word correct or

incorrect or to a positive action.

5. If moving in one direction gives you a match, move there, and

place your card in front of you on the table.

6. If moving in another direction allows you to take your

opponent’s card, you may choose to move there, take the card,

and take another turn using your opponent’s card.

7. If neither gives you a match or a positive action, move either

way, turn your card face down, and place it on the bottom of

the pile. Do not keep it. Your turn has ended.

8. Continue in this fashion until all cards are gone.

9. At the end of play, the player with the most cards wins

Practice Dictionary Skills

Worksheet 10.5

• Remind students that in a previous lesson, they learned about many

different parts of a dictionary.

• Review the various components of the dictionary such as entry

words, numbers of word meanings, and parts of speech.

• Ask students to complete Worksheet 10.5 independently or as a

teacher-guided activity

Supplemental Materials:NONE

Skill Check:Have students complete Worksheet 10.2 independently.

Notes/Reflection/Reminds: (Handwrite these in the box after you teach each lesson)

•Sample Questions. Please add your own and be reflective!

•How did the lesson go? What went well? With what did you struggle? What could have made the lesson better? Did the students understand? Who is still struggling? What do you need to change next year? How are you going to follow-up to make sure the learning stuck?

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )Remind students that they have learned two parts of speech—nouns and

verbs—and review them. (A noun names a person, place, or thing. A verb can

show action.)

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Wednesday March 1st , 2017

8:00- 8:45 MATH

8:50-9:35 GEOGRAPHY

Class Book: Native Americans: Regions and Cultures

Materials: Drawing paper, drawing tools

Tell the class or a group of students that they are going to make a class

book to help them remember what they have learned in this domain.

Have the students brainstorm important information about Native

Americans, the regions in which the different tribes settled, the types of

dwellings built by the different tribes, and some of the beliefs or practices

of the different tribes. Have each student choose one idea to draw a

picture of, and ask him or her to write a caption for the picture. Bind the

pages to make a book to put in the class library for students to read

again and again. You may choose to bind the book and keep it in the

classroom library for reference.

Oral Histories

Remind students that they heard that Native American people did not

put in writing any details about their lives. Ask students how these

people passed down their stories from one generation to the next. (orally)

Tell them that this method of passing down stories through different

9:40-10:25 DOMAIN

Poetry Reading

Materials: “Hiawatha’s Childhood,” by Henry Wadsworth

Longfellow, and “When Earth Becomes an It,” by Marilou

Awiakta (optional), from the poetry collection Listen, My

Children on the Recommended Resources list or from

another source

Tell students you are going to read a poem called “Hiawatha’s Childhood”

from the book The Song of Hiawatha, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Before reading, tell students to listen for clues in the poem that will tell

them which region and group of Native Americans this poem is about.

After reading the poem, you may wish to have students illustrate the

features of the poem that signify the Iroquois tribes and Northeast region.

You may also wish to read the poem “When Earth Becomes an It,” by

Cherokee poet Marilou Awiakta, and discuss the differences between the

poems and the poets’ points of view.

10:30-10:55 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:40 CKLA/LL Domain 9 LESSON 1

Introducing the Read-Aloud

Domain Introduction Poster 1 (World Map);

world map or globe (optional)

What Do We Know?

Poster 1;

Image Cards 1–3;

world map or globe

Making Predictions About the

Read-Aloud

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud 1492: A Year That Changed

the World

Poster 1;

Poster 2 (Routes of

Exploration);

Image Cards 4–7;

world map or globe (optional)

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Posters 1 and 2;

world map or globe (optional)

15

Word Work: Propose

Core Content Objectives

Students will:

Explain why kings and queens in Europe were interested in exploring

the Atlantic and the area to the west of Europe

Identify motivating factors that led to the exploration of the Americas

in different expeditions

Explain the significance of Christopher Columbus in the early Spanish

exploration of the Americas

Locate on a map or globe key places explored and visited by the

Spanish (the Caribbean Sea and the West Indies)

Describe the encounters between early explorers and Native

Americans

Domain Introduction

Ask students, “On what continent do we live?” Using a world map or a

globe (or Poster 1), ask a student to locate North America. Ask students,

“Who can locate the continent of Europe?” Have a volunteer point to the

European continent. Ask a different student volunteer if s/he can locate

Spain on Poster 1, or on a world map or globe. Tell students that over

the next few weeks, they will be learning about European explorers who

traveled to different parts of the Americas, and that first they will hear

about explorers who sailed for Spain. On Poster 1, or on a world map or

globe, point to the areas known as the Americas: North America, Central

America, South America, and the islands in the West Indies (the group of

islands that separate the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea from the

Atlantic Ocean).

What Do We Know?

Note: Students who have participated in the Core Knowledge

Language Arts program are familiar with the explorations and

accomplishments of Christopher Columbus and the foundations

of the United States through the Kindergarten Columbus and the

Pilgrims domain, and the Grade 1 A New Nation domain. Students

also learned about the Maya, the Aztec, and the Inca civilizations

in the Grade 1 Early American Civilizations domain, including

information about some conquistadors that interacted with these

native populations. These domains, along with the Grade 2 Westward

Expansion domain, also exposed students to the fact that Native

American populations have been mistreated by Europeans and

Americans who claimed land the native people had already settled

Making Predictions About the Read-Aloud

Read students the title of today’s read-aloud: “1492: A Year That

Changed the World.” Ask students to predict what happened in the year

1492 to change the world.

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully for the main ideas, or important points, of

The read-aloud, and to hear whether their predictions are correct.

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS

1. Were your predictions correct about how the year 1492

changed the world? Why or why not? (Answers may vary.)

2. What are the areas known today as the Americas? (North

America, Central America, South America, and the islands in the West

Indies) [Have a student volunteer point to these areas on a map, or

on Poster 1.] What was the year that Columbus sailed to the islands

in the West Indies? (1492) What was the area Columbus was trying

to reach on his voyage? (the East Indies in Asia) [Have a student

volunteer point to the parts of Asia that lay south of China and north

of Australia on a map, or on Poster 1.] Did Columbus realize that he

had arrived at the islands of the West Indies? (No, he was convinced

he had reached the East Indies in Asia.) [Have a student volunteer

point to the islands on Poster 2 where Columbus actually landed.]

3. Why was it important for Columbus to find a new route

to the East Indies? (Spice traders in Europe transported spices by

going through the Middle East on a long, dangerous journey. It took

a lot of time to transport the spices through the Middle East, and

that made buying spices expensive. Columbus wanted to find a new

route to make trading spices and other Asian goods cheaper.) Why do

you think it was so important to Europeans to have gold and spices?

(Answers may vary.) 4. Inferential What was Columbus’s bold idea that he proposed?

(Columbus knew that the earth was a sphere, or shaped like a ball, but

he didn’t think it was as big as most people thought. If the earth were

smaller, he could reach the other side of the world in a reasonable

amount of time by sailing west rather than east from Europe.)

5. Evaluative Was his proposed idea perfect? (no) Why not? (Columbus

was wrong about the size the earth, so the East Indies were farther

away than he thought. He also didn’t realize that there was a large

amount of land in the ocean blocking his westward path from Europe

to the East Indies.)

6. Evaluative Who were Columbus’s sponsors on his “Enterprise to the

Indies”? (King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain) Why do you

think they agreed to be his sponsors? (Answers may vary.)

7. Describe Columbus’s uncharted voyage and his

landing. (Columbus sailed in uncharted and unfamiliar waters for five

weeks with a fleet of three ships. His sailors grew nervous. One sailor

spotted land. Columbus thought he had reached the East Indies in

Asia, when he had really reached the West Indies. Columbus and his

crew explored the island and staked a flag in honor of Spain.)

8. Inferential How did Columbus first interact with the natives he met

on the island? (He called the people he made contact with “Indians.”

The natives were friendly, and the Europeans traded with the Native

Americans.) How did the Europeans and the natives communicate

with each other? (with gestures because they did not speak the same

language) What did Columbus think the natives were telling him?

(Columbus thought that the natives were telling him that there was

gold located on other islands.)

9. What did Columbus do to prepare for his return to

Spain? (He took some of the natives as prisoners in order to prove that

he had reached the East Indies. [Emphasize that Columbus thought he

had reached an undiscovered part of the East Indies, when in fact he

had actually landed in the West Indies.] He wrote a report describing

what he had found, including gold and spices, and described the

islands he claimed in honor of Spain.) Did his findings satisfy the king

and queen? (Yes, they decided to sponsor another voyage.)

nce

A.

At a Glance Exercise Materials

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

12:50-1:25 CKLA SKILLS LESSON

Lesson Number:

•Unit Lesson

Required Materials:Vocabulary Cards;

Worksheet 11.1, board; Worksheet 11.2 ,Worksheets 11.2–11.4

Objectives:

Reading Time Whole Group: “The Space

Shuttle”

What’s in Our Universe?;

Spelling Introduce Spelling Words

Take-Home Material Family Letter; “What’s it Like in

Space?”; “The Space Shuttle”

Advance Preparation:NONE

Instruction/Procedure:

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that today’s chapter is entitled “The Space Shuttle.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter

Vocabulary for “The Space Shuttle”

1. space shuttle—a manned spacecraft used for exploration (92)

2. exploration—the study of unknown places or things (92)

3. reusable—when something can be used more than once (92)

4. shuttle—to go back and forth from one place to the next

(shuttled) (94)

5. booster rocket—one of two parts of a space shuttle that helps

launch it into space by overcoming gravity (booster rockets) (94)

6. research—the kind of equipment used to collect information

through experiments (96)

7. especially—very much; particularly (96)

8. space station—a manned satellite that is made to be in outer

space for a long period of time (96)

9. unmanned—not carrying people (96)

10. satellite—a natural or man-made object that orbits a planet or

smaller object (satellites) (96)

Introduce Spelling Words

• Tell students that this week, they will review the spellings of /ae/, /k/,

/s/, /j/, and /n/.

• As you introduce each of the spelling words, write it on the board,

pronouncing each word as you write it.

Supplemental Materials:NONE

Skill Check:Independant worksheets

Notes/Reflection/Reminds: (Handwrite these in the box after you teach each lesson)

•Sample Questions. Please add your own and be reflective!

•How did the lesson go? What went well? With what did you struggle? What could have made the lesson better? Did the students understand? Who is still struggling? What do you need to change next year? How are you going to follow-up to make sure the learning stuck?

rcise Materials Minutes

Ba

1:30-1:55 SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Thursday, March 2nd , 2017

8:00-8:45 STEM/PE

Song: “1492” Ask students, “Who recalls the short rhyme to help us remember the year

Columbus sailed to the Americas?” (“In fourteen hundred ninety-two /

Columbus sailed the ocean blue.”) Tell students that the rhyme is part of

a song about Columbus, his bold idea, and the people he encountered

who were already living in the area where he landed. Tell students they

will be listening to the song today. Visit the website noted above to play

the audio, and if possible, display the lyrics for the class to follow along

as they listen to the song.

You may wish to address the following content after listening to the song

once or twice:

• Review the Native American groups mentioned with which students

are familiar. Emphasize that these are just a few of the Native

American groups that were living in the Americas.

• Explain that the Menominee are Native Americans who lived in the

area now known as the eastern boundary between Wisconsin and the

upper peninsula of Michigan. [Point to the Menominee on Image Card

3, near the Great Lakes.]

• Explain that the Onondaga are the Native Americans who lived in the

area now known as New York. [Point to the Onondaga on Image Card

3, near the label of the Iroquois.] Explain that the Onondaga are one

of the original five tribes that composed the Iroquois Confederacy.

• Explain that the Cree are Native Americans who lived in the subarctic

region of Alaska and Canada. [Point to the Cree on Image Card 3,

below the much smaller labels of the Inuit and the Thule.]

• Explain that the Caribs are the American Indians who lived on the

islands in the Caribbean Sea. The Caribbean Sea is named after

these American Indians.

P

8:50-9:35 MATH

MATH/Seconds

Objectives: Understand the second as a unit of measurement.

Measure time in seconds, Convert from minutes and seconds and vice versa.

Materials? Large wall clock with a second hand/Stop watches.

Teaching Strategies: Have a large wall clock with second hand ready. Tell students to observe the movement of the seconds, minutes and hour hands. Have students watch the clock for 2 min. Ask students how many rounds the second hand moved. Tell students that it moved two rounds. Ask students how much the hand moved. Tell the students that it moved two marks. Ask students how long that is. Tell students that it is 2 min. Tell students that 2 rounds of the second hand is 2 min, so 1 round is a minute. Ask students how many seconds 1 round is. Tell students that 1 round is 60 sec. So 60 sec is a minute. Write on board 1 min=60 sec.

Measure time in seconds: Divide students into pairs or groups. Give each group a stopwatch, or let them use their watches as stopwatches. Have them turn to TB p. 121 and 122. Find out the answers to tasks 1 and 2. Have them record their results in their TB.

Assess: Have students do task 3, TB p. 123

Practice: Exercise 6, p. 133-136

9:40-10:25 DOMAIN IN CLASS ACTIVITIES

Exploration Timeline

Ask students if they remember the terms BC and BCE. Remind them

that they discussed these terms and this time period when they studied

ancient Rome. They should remember that BC stands for “Before

Christ” and BCE stands for “Before the Christian/Common Era.” Remind

students that they also learned about the terms AD and CE when they

studied ancient Rome. AD is a calendar term that stands for Anno Domini

[an-oh dom-uh-nee], which is Latin for “in the year of the Lord,” and CE

is a calendar term that stands for “Christian/Common Era.” Explain that

we are living in the latter of the two eras identified: AD or CE. Explain

that when we write the date, we can identify our era by including “AD”

before the date or “CE” after the date. Tell students that the voyage of

Columbus, and events that they will be hearing about throughout the

domain, take place in AD/CE, the more recent years; however, remind

students that native peoples in the Americas began their settlements in

the BC/BCE time period, a much longer time ago.

Tell students that as a class, you are going to create a timeline to help

them sequence important events about early European exploration of

the Americas. You may want to attach several pieces of chart paper that

would be large enough to accommodate twelve image cards used for this

reoccurring timeline activity.

Show students Image Card 2 (Maya, Aztec, Inca). Remind students

that these vast empires existed for several hundreds or thousands of

years, long before the Americas and areas of what we now call the

United States were ever inhabited by Europeans. Tell students that the

Maya, Aztec, and the Inca interacted with many Europeans when they

started exploring the Americas. Explain that they will briefly hear about

their shared history in this domain. Show students Image Card 3 (Native

American Groups Across North America). Explain to students that, like

the Maya, Aztec, and Inca, Native Americans in North America and

Canada settled in these areas long before Europeans knew they existed.

Tell students that there were many more tribes in these areas than the ones shown, and that these are only a small representation. Place Image

Cards 2 and 3 on the left end of the timeline, putting one above the other

to indicate a “shared” time frame prior to European exploration in the

Americas. Show students Image Card 1 (Christopher Columbus). Ask

students to share what they remember about his voyage to the West

Indies in 1492. Ask students, “If the Native Americans and the early

American civilizations existed before Europeans traveled to the Americas,

should Columbus’s voyage to the West Indies be placed before or after

Image Cards 2 and 3?” (after Image Cards 2 and 3) Have a volunteer

place the image card on the timeline. Show students Image Card 8 (Viking Explorers). Ask students to

describe what they see and to share what they remember about the

Vikings, especially about Leif Eriksson. Remind students that he became

recognized as the first known European to set foot in an area now known

as Newfoundland in Canada in North America. Point to Newfoundland

on Poster 1, or on a world map or globe. Remind students that Eriksson

found that there were already people living in Newfoundland, the Inuit.

Ask students, “If Leif Eriksson was the first known European to set foot

in North America, but he found that there were already Native Americans

settled in the area, where does this image card fit on the timeline?”

(between Image Card 1 and 2) Ask a student volunteer to explain why it

should be placed there. (Native Americans were already present in the

area, but the European explorer Columbus arrived in the islands of the

West Indies after Leif Eriksson arrived in Newfoundland.) Tell students

that at the time of these voyages, the Americas were indeed a “New

World” to the Europeans, because they had no idea anyone was settled

there. Explain to students that what they will be hearing throughout the

domain happened long before the birth of our nation, the United States

of America.

10:30-10:55 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:40 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 9 LESSON 2

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned?

Poster 1 (World Map);

Poster 2 (Routes of

Exploration);

Exploration Timeline;

world map or globe (optional) 10

What Do We Know?

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Columbus and the

Conquistadors Image Cards 2, 9 20

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Poster 1;

world map or globe (optional)

Word Work: Conquistadors chart paper, chalkboard,

What Have We Already Learned?

Briefly review with the students the content they learned from the

previous read-aloud. To guide the review, you may wish to show any

images from the previous read-aloud, and/or ask the following questions:

• Using Poster 2 (Routes of Exploration), have a student volunteer

trace Christopher Columbus’s voyage (brown dots) from Spain to the

New World. As the student traces the voyage, encourage him/her to

name the places along the journey, e.g., “Columbus started in Spain,

traveled to the Canary Islands,” etc.

• What area was Columbus hoping to reach? (the East Indies) [Have a

student volunteer point to this area on Poster 1, or on a world map or

globe.]

• Why was Columbus eager to find a shorter route to the East Indies?

(to gain wealth and fame) Why did King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella agree to sponsor his

voyage? (They wanted to claim wealth and new lands in honor of

Spain.)

• On what lands did he end up landing? (the West Indies) [Have a student

volunteer point to this area on Poster 1, or on a world map or globe.]

• What year did Columbus sail to islands in the Caribbean, or the West

Indies? (1492)

• Upon which island did Columbus land, claim for Spain, and build

a fort? (Hispaniola) [Have a student volunteer point to the island

of Hispaniola—the island that today is comprised of Haiti and the

Dominican Republic—on Poster 1, or on a world map or globe.]

Review the information covered thus far on the timeline, highlighting the

sequence of events. Emphasize that, although Columbus and his crew

were the first known Europeans to sail to the islands of the Caribbean,

he and his crew were not the first people to arrive there; the Native

Americans called the Taino were there before him.

Purpose for Listening

Tell students that in today’s read-aloud, they will continue learning about

Christopher Columbus. Remind students that at the end of the previous

read-aloud, they heard that King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain

agreed to fund another voyage as his sponsors. Ask students to predict

what Columbus would find on his second voyage.

Comprehension Questions

1. Evaluative Were your predictions correct about what Columbus found

on his second voyage? Why or why not? (Answers may vary.)

2. Inferential How many voyages did Columbus make to the West

Indies? (four) [Have a student volunteer locate the West Indies on

Poster 1, or on a world map or globe. Remind students that Columbus

believed he reached the East Indies in Asia, even though he ended up

landing in the West Indies.] 3. Inferential How did the Spanish public respond to Columbus on his

return to Spain? (He was well received as a hero. The king and queen

of Spain named him the “Admiral of the Ocean Sea,” a big honor.)

How was Columbus’s report able to spread so quickly and easily? (It

was printed in great quantities on the newly invented printing press.)

4. Inferential Who sponsored Columbus’s second voyage? (the king and

queen of Spain, Ferdinand and Isabella) You heard that Columbus

explored the coasts of different islands before returning to Hispaniola,

where he had built a fort and left behind thirty-nine crew members

from his first voyage. What did he expect to find upon his return? (He

hoped the men he had left behind would have established peaceful

trading relationships with the Taino, and that they would have

collected large quantities of gold.)

5. What did Columbus actually find upon his return to the island

of Hispaniola? (The fort had been burned to the ground, the crew left

on the island from his first voyage had been killed, and there was no

collected gold.)

6 Describe the way Columbus and his crew members

treated the Taino. (The Taino were treated unfairly. The crew members

left behind from the first voyage raided their villages and took many

of them as slaves. When Columbus returned on his second voyage,

he created unfair rules, forcing the Taino to collect gold and work on

plantations. Columbus took some Native Americans back to Europe

as slaves. Many Native Americans were killed because of these

unfair rules, and many more died because they were not immune

to the germs the Europeans carried in their bodies.) How did the

Taino respond to this treatment? (Many of them fought against the

conquering Europeans but did not have much success. They were

weakened by disease.)

7. You heard that Columbus’s crew grew increasingly

unhappy. Why? (His crew began to understand that he had

exaggerated about the amount of gold on the island. They felt that he

had lied to them about the riches they would find on the island.) What

did his crew do? (Some of them decided to sail back to Spain and

complain about Columbus to the king and queen.) How did that make

Columbus feel? (Columbus grew nervous or anxious.) 8. ✍ Evaluative Compare and contrast Columbus’s first voyage and

second voyage. In other words, what were some similarities and

some differences? (Answers may vary, but may include the following:

similarities—King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain sponsored

both voyages, Columbus arrived by traveling west, he had to recruit

sailors, and he traveled in search of gold and spices; differences—

the second voyage was much bigger with more ships and men,

Columbus had an easier time recruiting sailors on the second voyage,

and he treated the natives poorly on the second voyage, whereas on

the first voyage, he traded peacefully, etc.)

9. Literal Who were the conquistadors? (The many men who explored

and conquered lands for Spain were known as conquistadors, the

Spanish word for conqueror. Conquistadors were travelers, soldiers,

and explorers from Spain who traveled to the Americas to look for

wealth, conquer the native peoples, and take over land.)

10. How do you think the Native Americans felt about the

conquistadors in the Americas? Why? (Answers may vary.)

I am going to ask a question. I will give you a minute to think about the

question, and then I will ask you to turn to your neighbor and discuss the

question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you discussed

with your partner.

11. Think Pair Share: Why were Columbus’s voyages

important to the explorers and conquistadors who would come after

him and trek across the Americas? How do you think this would

affect the native peoples in the Americas? (Answers may vary, but

may include the following: Columbus inspired people to travel to

uncharted territories through unfamiliar waters in search of riches; his

exaggerated reports led others to believe there was immense wealth

waiting to be discovered; Europeans now knew there were entire

continents to the west, and Europeans considered this new land their

own to explore; the native peoples would gradually lose their land

and way of life; many native people would die in conflicts with the

Europeans, and die of diseases to which they were not immune; etc.)

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

12:50-1:25 CKLA SKILLS

Lesson Number:

•Unit Lesson

Required Materials:Worksheet 12.1,Worksheet 12.2,Worksheet 12.3,board or chart paper;

Objectives:

Reading Time Partner Reading: “The

International Space Station”

What’s in Our Universe?;

Grammar Introduce Singular Possessive

Nouns

Take-Home Material “The International Space

Station”

Advance Preparation

Create and display the following possessive nouns poster:

Possessive Nouns

• A singular possessive noun shows that one person, place, or thing

has or owns something. Form a singular possessive noun by adding

an apostrophe and ‘s’ to a singular noun. (–’s)

Write the following sentences on the board or chart paper for use during

the Grammar lesson:

(The office of the doctor) is crowded today.

(The tractor of the farmer) is painted green.

(The ballet shoes of the dancer) are made of pink silk.

(The mitt of the catcher) is made of brown leather.

(The letters from the visitor) made me laugh

Instruction/Procedure:

.

Partner Reading: “The International Space Station”

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that today, they will partner read the chapter called “The

International Space Station” and complete Worksheet 12.1 as they read.

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter.

• Ask students to predict what astronauts do at the space station.

Introduce Singular Possessive Nouns

• Ask, “What is a noun?” (name of a person, place, or thing)

• Ask, “What is the difference between a common noun and a proper

noun?” (A common noun names a general person, place, or thing,

such as boy, airport, or book. A proper noun names a specific person,

place, or thing, such as Mrs. Brown, Park Elementary School, or the

Washington Monument.)

• Ask, “What is different between a common noun and a proper noun

in terms of capitalization?” (A common noun is not capitalized while a

proper noun is capitalized.)

• Ask, “What is the difference between singular and plural nouns?”

(Singular denotes one while plural denotes more than one.)

• Tell students, “One interesting way nouns can be used is to show

ownership. Examples are: The book that belongs to a girl is the girl’s

book. The desk that belongs to a boy is the boy’s desk. The pencil

that belongs to Mrs. Todd is Mrs. Todd’s pencil.”

• Direct students’ attention to the possessive nouns poster you created

and displayed in advance and read it with them.

Possessive Nouns

A singular possessive noun shows that one person, place, or

thing has or owns something. Form a singular possessive noun

by adding an apostrophe and ‘s’ to a singular noun. (–’s)

• Tell students that the words girl’s, boy’s, and Mrs. Todd’s are called

singular possessive nouns.

• Tell students that the word possessive means to possess something

or own it.

• Tell students that a singular possessive noun shows that one person,

place, or thing has or owns something.

Supplemental Materials:NONE

Skill Check: Review answers to Worksheet 12.1 as a class.

Notes/Reflection/Reminds: (Handwrite these in the box after you teach each lesson)

•Sample Questions. Please add your own and be reflective!

•How did the lesson go? What went well? With what did you struggle? What could have made the lesson better? Did the students understand? Who is still struggling? What do you need to change next year? How are you going to follow-up to make sure the learning stuck?

1:30-1:55 SILENT READING

SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Friday ,March 3rd , 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials MUSIC/DRAMA

P

8:50-9:35 Math

Practice B

Objectives: Practice converting between hours, minutes, seconds, years, months, weeks, and days

Practice solving word problems involving addition and subtraction of time.

Teaching Strategies:

Practice: Have students do Practice B, TB p. 124

Call on students to explain how they solved the problems. Provide any reteaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Extra Practice: Exercise 2,.p. 205-206

Tests: 2A and 2B,.p. 209-214

Review 11

Objectives: Review concepts learned in Units 1-11

Materials: Cards with years and months and corresponding number of months and likewise for weeks and days

Teaching Strategies: Review: Have students do Review 11, TB p. 125-126

You can do this as a class having students do the problems one at a time on individual marker boards and sharing their answers. Provide any reteaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Activity: Version 1 Convert between years and months.
Use 10-20 pair of cards for each group, one card in each pair with the years and months and the other with the corresponding number of months.

Version 2: Convert between weeks and days. Use 10-20 pairs of cards for each group, one card in each pair with the weeks and days and the other with the corresponding number of days.

Material for each group: 10-20 pairs of cards as described above.

Procedure: Cards are shuffled, placed face down in the middle, and the first one turned over. Students take turns turning over the next card and trying to match it with a faceup card. If there is n o match, they leave it face up on the table.

Problem Solving: Give students copies of Appendix 11.ry or in small groups. Discuss their solutions.

Practice: WB Review 11, p. 141-145.

Tests: Units 1-11, Cumulative Tests A and B,. p. 215-226

9:40-10:25 DOMAIN IN CLASS ACTIVITIES

Expedition Log: Christopher Columbus (Instructional Master 2B-1)

To complete this reoccurring activity, you may wish to

differentiate by having some students work individually, with a partner,

or with a small group. You will need to save all of the students’ journal

entries to be compiled into a booklet for each student at the end

of the domain. You may wish to have students refer to their written

responses to comprehension questions for this activity.

Explain to students that explorers wrote in journals, or logs, to help them

remember important information about their expedition. These journals

described the landscape of a certain area, the people they encountered,

and the resources they found on their travels. Tell students that some

explorers also sketched images of the places, people, and things they

encountered. Sometimes these logs would get printed and shared with

the public upon their return to their home country. Remind students

that Columbus’s report to the king and queen of Spain was printed on

the newly invented printing press, and because of that, word about

his travels quickly spread throughout Europe, encouraging the age of

exploration.

Tell students that they will be creating an expedition log to help them

remember important information they learn in this domain. Tell students

that page 1 of the journal will be about Christopher Columbus and his

voyages. Have students use the information heard in the first two readalouds

and the images from the read-aloud to help them remember

details about Christopher Columbus and answer the questions on

Instructional Master 2B-1. After answering the questions, have students

draw a picture to illustrate the information. After writing and drawing,

have students share their journal pages with a partner or with the class.

10:30-10:55 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:40 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 9 LESSON 3

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned?

Poster 1 (World Map);

Exploration Timeline;

world map or globe (optional)

10 Making Predictions About the

Read-Aloud Image Card 10

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Juan Ponce de León

Poster 1;

Image Cards 11 and 12;

world map or globe (optional)

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions

Poster 1;

Image Card 10;

Exploration Timeline;

world map or globe (optional)

Word Work: Colonization

What Have We Already Learned?

Review the information covered thus far, highlighting the sequence of

events on the timeline. Emphasize that, although Columbus and his crew

were the first known Europeans to discover the islands of the Caribbean,

he and his crew were not the first people to arrive there—the Native

Americans were.

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully to learn about Juan Ponce de León’s

expedition and his discoveries. Tell students to listen carefully to hear if

their predictions about what Ponce de León found in Florida are correct.

1. Evaluative Were your predictions correct about what Ponce de León

would discover? Why or why not? (Answers may vary.)

2. Inferential What did Ponce de León do before becoming an explorer in

the New World? (He fought the Moors in Spain and helped drive them

out of Europe.) Who were the Moors? (The Moors were Muslims who

came to Spain from Morocco and other parts of North Africa, and took

over most of the Iberian Peninsula, the land where Portugal and Spain

are. They were part of a civilization with great architecture, writers, and

scientific and cultural achievements. Their religion of Islam clashed with

Christianity. They inhabited the Iberian Peninsula until they were forced

out by the armies of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella from Spain.)

3. On which of Columbus’s expeditions did Ponce de

León travel? (the second voyage, or expedition) How do you think

Columbus may have influenced Ponce de León? (Answers may vary,

but may include that Columbus inspired Ponce de León to explore

and find the wealth Columbus had reported.)

4. You heard that Ponce de León was given some land on

Hispaniola. Why? (In the year 1504, the Taino rebelled because they

were angered by the years of mistreatment by the Spaniards. Ponce

de León played an important part in stopping the rebellion. He was

awarded a piece of land on Hispaniola, appointed as governor of the

island, and assigned a number of slave laborers to help him cultivate

a plantation.) 5. ✍ Inferential Did Ponce de León stay on Hispaniola, or did he explore

nearby areas? (He explored nearby areas.) What led him to explore

nearby areas? (He was interested in finding gold. With the help of

a translator, he might have also heard an intriguing story about the

Fountain of Youth, and he may have wanted to find that as well.) What

areas did he explore? (Puerto Rico and the coast of Florida) [Have a

student volunteer point to these areas on Poster 1, or on a world map

or globe.]

6. What were some of Ponce de León’s discoveries? (the

Gulf Stream, the Florida Peninsula) What is the Gulf Stream? (The Gulf

Stream is like a river within the Atlantic Ocean. It is a current of warm

water that flows out of the Gulf of Mexico, around Florida, along the

southeastern coast of the United States, and then northeast, all the

way to northern Europe.) [Have a student volunteer point to the area

of the Gulf Stream in the Atlantic Ocean on Poster 1, Image Card 12,

or on a world map or globe.]

7. Did Ponce de León ever find the Fountain of Youth? (no)

Do you think the Fountain of Youth really exists? Why or why not?

(Answers may vary, but no it does not really exist. However, there are

many tourist areas throughout Florida and the Caribbean which claim

to be the Fountain of Youth.)

8. Describe the interaction between Ponce de León

and the Native Americans he encountered on his expedition. (They

experienced many conflicts. The Native Americans would attack the

Europeans because they wanted to protect themselves and the land

they inhabited. Ponce de León and the members of his expedition

often mistreated the native people, which did not help the relationship

between the two.)

9. You learned that Ponce de León was interested in colonization.

What does that mean? (He wanted to develop a settlement in the area

and take control of the land and the people who lived there.) Was this

successful? Why or why not? (It was not successful because, as they

were setting up their colony along the southwestern coast of Florida, they

were attacked by the Calusa Indians.)

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

12:50-1:25 CKLA SKILLS UNIT

Lesson Number:13

Required Materials: Worksheet 13.2,Worksheet 13.1

Objectives:

Assessment Student Skills Assessment

Optional Assessment of

Fluency “The Hoba Meteorite”

Advance Preparation:NONE

Instruction/Procedure:

Student Skills Assessment

• Have students tear out Worksheet 13.1.

• Tell students they will read three selections printed on Worksheet 13.1

and answer comprehension, morphology, grammar, and dictionary

skills questions that follow each selection.

• Tell students that should they feel tired, it’s a good idea to take a short,

personal break. Explain to students that they need to respect the

others in the classroom and stay seated, while quietly looking up to the

ceiling, stretching their shoulders, and taking a deep breath or two.

• Tell students they should go right on to the second selection once

they have finished the first and right on to the third selection once

they have finished the second.

• Encourage students to do their best.

• Once students finish all three selections, encourage them to review

their papers, rereading and looking over their answers carefully. Again, explain the necessity of respecting that not all classmates

will finish at the same time, and, if they finish and have checked their

papers, they should remain quiet and allow others to finish.

When time permits, score these assessments using the guidelines at the

end of this lesson to evaluate each student’s mastery of the skills taught

in this unit.

If additional practice is needed to remediate skills students have not

mastered, materials are available in the Pausing Point.

Instructions for Student Fluency Assessment

• Turn to the text copy of “The Hoba Meteorite” at the end of this

lesson. This is the text copy students will read aloud.

• Ask the student to remove Worksheet 13.2 from his/her workbook.

You will use this worksheet to mark as a running record as you listen

to the student read orally.

• Tell the student that you are going to ask him or her to read the

selection aloud. Explain that you are going to keep a record of the

amount of time it takes him or her to read the selection. Please also

explain to the student that he/she should not rush but rather read at

his/her own regular pace.

• Begin timing when the student reads the first word of the selection.

If you are using a watch, write the exact Start Time, in minutes and

seconds, on your record page. If you are using a stopwatch, you

do not need to write down the start time since the stopwatch will

calculate Elapsed Time. As the student reads the selection, make

a running record on the copy with the student’s name using the

following guidelines:

Supplemental Materials:NONE

•How are you using these materials in your instruction?

Skill Check:REVIEW STUDENT ANSWERS

Notes/Reflection/Reminds: (Handwrite these in the box after you teach each lesson)

•Sample Questions. Please add your own and be reflective!

•How did the lesson go? What went well? With what did you struggle? What could have made the lesson better? Did the students understand? Who is still struggling? What do you need to change next year? How are you going to follow-up to make sure the learning stuck?

1:30-1:55 SILENT READING

SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up