LESSON PLANS JAN 23-27

Monday , January 23, 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials PE/ART Math Review (Division, Fractions, Time)

Division Review: Objectives: Find the quotient of tens, hundreds or thousands by a 1 digit number using estimation.

Write “356 divided by 3 equals” on the whiteboard. Remind the students that it is always a good idea to estimate the answer in advance so that they know whether their actual answer makes sense. Ask students for the estimate of 356 divided by 3. Tell students to round 356 first. Ask students how they would round 356. They may round it to the nearest hundred.

Write “ 400 divided by 3 equals”? On the whiteboard. Ask students if there will be a remainder. (yes) Tell students since they cannot round it to the nearest hundred, 00, they can try rounding it to the nearest ten. Ask students which ten they should round it to. Tell students they can look at 330 or 360 as such numbers are divisible by 3.

Consider 330 divided by 3 and 360 divided by 4, which is better estimate? Write the above equations on the whiteboard. Tell students that 356 is nearer to 360 than to 330, so 330 divided by 3 is a better estimate. Ask students for the estimated quotient. Tell them that the estimated quotient is 120. Have students to workout the actual quotient. Give students ample time to work out the answer. Then tell them the answer is 8 R 2. So the actual answer is reasonable.

Asses: Have students do tasks 9-11, TB p. 136

Practice: WB exercise 5, p. 91-92

Extra practice: Exercise 5,p. 91-92

Tests: Tests 5A and 5B,p. 175-182

Division Review: Division

Objectives: Divide tens, hundreds or thousands by a 1-digit number.

Materials: Number discs

Appendix 4.5b

Teaching Strategies: Draw or display 8 ones. Tell students the discs are going to be divided into two groups. Ask them how many disc will there be in group. (4) Separate the disc into 2 groups. Tell students that there are 4 ones in a group. Write “8 ones divided by 2=4 ones” and “8 divided by 2=4” on the whiteboard. Draw or display 8 tens. Tell students the discs are going to be divided into two groups. Ask the them how many discs will there be in each groups. (40) Separate the discs in two groups. Tell students that there are 4 tens in a group. Write b”8 tens divided by 2=4 tens” and “80 divided by 2=40” on the whiteboard. Show 8 hundreds. Tell students the discs are going to be divided into two groups. Ask them how many discs will there be in each group. Separate discs into 2 groups. Tell students that there are 4 hundreds in a group. Write “8 hundreds divided by 2 =4 hundreds” and “800 divided by 2=400” on the whiteboard. Tell students that 8 thousands will be divided into 2 groups. Ask them how many will be in a group. (400) Tell students that there will be 4 thousands in a group. Write “8 thousands divided by 2=4 thousands” and 8000 divided by 2 = 4000 on the whiteboard. Have students study the above equations. Ask them if they observed any pattern. Tell students that they need simply divide 8 by 2 and then add the correct number of 0’s.

Assess: Have students do tasks 6-8, TB p. 135

Practice: WB Exercise 19,p. 152-153

Review

Objectives: Review concepts learned in Unit 4

Teaching Strategies: Have students do Review 4, TB p. 137-139

This review can be done in class. H

Ave students do the problems one at a time on individual marker board or paper and share their answer. Provide re-teaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Practice Problem Solving: WB Review 4,p. 155-161

Tests: Units 1-4, Cumulative Tests A and B,p. 183-19

Fraction Review: Materials and Preparation Fractions

•Board

•Computers

•Individual dry erase boards (1 per group)

•Markers

•Fraction strips (cut out 1/8 strips from construction paper, 1 set per student)

•Same Denominator Partner Problems worksheet

Key Terms:

•denominator

•Numerator

•Learning Objectives

Students will be able to compare fractions with the same denominators.

Introduction Write a list of fractions with the same denominator, or bottom number, on the board, such as 1/3 and 2/3.

•Ask student volunteers to share a fraction comparison that they noticed, For example: 1/3 is less than 2/3.

•Write the fraction comparisons on the board, such as 1/3 2/4 next to the number line.

•Explain that using a number line and drawing are two different ways that can help determine fraction comparison.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling

•Give students 1/8 fraction strips, and have them make 2/8 and 4/8.

•Instruct students to draw a number line or make a drawing to compare.

•Then, direct students to write a comparative statement on their individual dry erase boards or notebooks.

Independent Working Time Direct students to work with a partner to complete the word problems on the Same Denominator Partner Problems worksheet.

•As students are working, circulate around the classroom to ask students to verbally explain their work.

Extend

Differentiation

•Enrichment: Use mixed denominators to compare fractions, and have your students use a number line or drawing to show this visually.

•Support: Put students in small groups, and direct them to use their dry erase boards to draw number lines and use drawings to make their comparative statements. Have them focus on the visuals rather than the numbers and number statements.

Review and Closing Ask a student volunteer to explain her answer in words to the class for the assessment.

•Instruct a different student to show a number line for this problem.

•Have a third volunteer show a drawing for this problem.

•Direct students to create a fraction rule or pattern when comparing fractions with the same denominator.

Equivalent Fractions: Asses Review Have student review task 1 TB p.92

Practice WB Exercise 4,.p. 100-101 Review

Telling Time: Ch 1 Review

Reading and writing time. Understanding the relative magnitudes of hours and minutes. Tell time to 1 minute intervals.

Materials: Geared mini clocks

Resources: TB: p. 112-113 WB: p. 123-124

Review a.m and p.m: TB: p. 114-115 WB: p. 125-126

Convert hours to minutes: TB: p. 116 WB: 127-128

Solving word problems involving time and duration: TB: p. 117 WB: 129-130

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8:50-9:35 CKLA REVIEW

Morphology

Review Suffixes –er, –or, –ist, and –ian

• Worksheets PP14 and PP15 (SKILLS UNIT 5)

• Answer questions using words with suffixes

Suffixes –y and –al

• Worksheet PP16

• Add the correct suffix to root words and write the meaning of the

affixed word; determine the correct word using word meaning

Suffixes –ous and –ly

• Worksheet PP17

• Select suffixed word to complete sentence, identify part of speech;

apply knowledge of suffixes to determine correct word using word

Meaning

Writing Prompts

3. Explain how your eyes see color.

Either fiction or nonfiction:

1. Summarize the story or chapter you read in three to five

sentences.

2. After reading this story or chapter, I wonder…

3. Name three things you liked about the story or chapter.

4. Make a timeline of three to five events in your reading

today.

5. Pretend you are a TV reporter who has to interview the

main character or person in the story or chapter you

read, and write down five questions you would ask.

6. Make a prediction about what will happen next in the

story or chapter you just read. Explain why you think this will happen.

7. Pretend you are the main character or a person in the

story or chapter you read today and write a diary entry

for that person.

8. Tell about something in the story or chapter you read

today that is similar to something you have already read.

9. Draw a Venn diagram to show what is alike and/or

different between two characters or people in the story

or chapter you read.

10. How does the title fit the story or chapter? Suggest

another title.

11. Write down three new words you learned while reading

9:40-10:25 DOMAIN IN CLASS ACTIVITIES

Venn Diagram: Compare and Contrast

Materials: Instructional Master PP-1; chart paper,

Tell students that together you are going to compare and contrast two

people or items students have learned about by asking how the people

or items are similar and how they are different. Use Instructional Master

PP-1 to list two people or items at the top of the diagram and to capture

information provided by students. Choose from the following list or create

a pair of your own:

• Bjorn and Toli

• Greenland and Iceland

• Viking warriors and all Norse people

• blacksmiths and fisherman

• the Romans and the Vikings

• skalds and Viking warriors

longship, cargo ship, and rowboat; Ingólfur

Arnarson, Erik the Red, and Leif Eriksson; Norway, Denmark, and

Sweden; etc.

Be a Skald

Remind students that skalds were poets who memorized the Vikings’

sagas and mythology. They orally passed on these sagas and myths,

teaching them to other skalds. Tell students that they will get to act as

a skald. Ask them to select a short section of a Norse myth they have

read from the Skills reader. Students will read that section of a story to

the class, relying on their gestures and voice to make the storytelling

dramatic.

10:30-10:55 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:40 CKLA/LL Domain 6 Assessment

Domain Assessment

Part I (Instructional Master DA-1)

Directions: Look at the numbers on the map of the places that were

a part of the Viking Age. Then, look at the words in the word bank.

Write the correct number on the blank beside the correct word. Color

Scandinavia green. Identify one other place the Vikings traveled to for

raids or for trade, and color it blue. Write the name of the place you

colored blue in the word bank.

Part II (Instructional Master DA-2)

Directions: Listen to the sentence I read. Read the three words in the row.

Circle the name of the person, place, or thing described in the sentence.

1. People in England and in other parts of Europe lived south of

Scandinavia, and they therefore called the Vikings Norsemen, which

means . (Northmen)

2. The Viking people worshipped gods and goddesses. (many)

3. left Iceland and was the first known European to settle in

Greenland. (Erik the Red)

4. The were poets who memorized Norse sagas and myth.

(skalds)

5. Which of these were not considered one of the social orders, or

groups, of the Viking Age people? (warriors)

6. The was the name of the outdoor assembly where the Norse

made decisions for their town. (Thing) 7. In the inner parts of Iceland, there are , large bodies of snow

and ice. (glaciers)

8. Jewelry, swords, and keys are examples of items that a skilled Viking

Age would have made. (blacksmith)

9. was the first known European to settle in Newfoundland, or

Vinland. (Leif the Lucky/Leif Eriksson)

10. The Vikings were the earliest known Europeans to set foot on the

continent of . (North America)

Part III (Instructional Master DA-3)

Directions: Read along as I read each sentence. Think about the answer

to the question or statement. Write one or two complete sentences to

answer each question.

1. What are two things the Vikings and Viking people did on their trips to

other places?

2. Describe the three types of Viking ships.

3. How did living close to the water influence the lives of Viking people?

4. Besides raiding and trading, what else did the Viking people rely on

for their living?

5. Describe the everyday life of the Viking people.

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

12:50-1:25 CKLA SKILLS PAUSING POINT

Reading Time Small Group: Remediation and

Enrichment

Adventures in Light and Sound;

Small Group: Remediation and Enrichment

Small Group: “Light and Photography”

Small Group: “Thomas Edison: The Wizard of Menlo Park”

Worksheet PP1

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that the title of today’s chapter is “Light and Photography.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter. The Guided Reading Supports that follow are intended for use while you

work with students in Small Group 1.

›. Small Group 1: Ask these students to come to the reading table and

read the chapter with you.

.

›. Small Group 2: Ask these students to read the chapter independently

to find out what light has to do with photography. Remind them that

the bolded words in the chapter are found in the glossary and match

the words you previewed. Some words may appear in different forms

in the chapter. Then, tell them to complete Worksheet PP1.

Grammar

Adverbs that Tell how

• Worksheet PP9

• Identify adverbs that fit in sentences, change adjectives to adverbs

that end with –ly

Adverbs that Tell when and where

• Worksheet PP10

• Apply adverbs in context, write sentences using adverbsConjunction and

• Worksheet PP11

• Write compound subjects/predicates and compound sentences using

and; join and write simple sentences as compound sentences

Practice Conjunction and

• Worksheet PP12

• Identify subject/predicate, compound subjects/predicates, and

compound sentences

Conjunction but

• Worksheet PP13

• Create compound sentences with conjunction but

1:30-1:55 SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Tuesday , January 24, 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials PE/ART Math Review

Word Problem Review: Objectives: Review concepts learned in Unit 4

Teaching Strategies: Have students do Review 4, TB p. 137-139

This review can be done in class. H
Ave students do the problems one at a time on individual marker board or paper and share their answer. Provide re-teaching of concepts that may be necessary.

Practice Problem Solving: WB Review 4,p. 155-161

Tests: Units 1-4, Cumulative Tests A and B,p. 183-194

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8:50-9:35 Reading Comprehension REVIEW

READ 2 SECLECTIOMS OF STORIES AND ANSWER QUESTIONS WHOLE GROUP WITH CLASS

1. Monitoring comprehension

Students who are good at monitoring their comprehension know when they understand what they read and when they do not. They have strategies to “fix” problems in their understanding as the problems arise. Research shows that instruction, even in the early grades, can help students become better at monitoring their comprehension.

Comprehension monitoring instruction teaches students to:

1.Be aware of what they do understand

2.Identify what they do not understand

3.Use appropriate strategies to resolve problems in comprehension

4.2. Metacognition

5.Metacognition can be defined as “thinking about thinking.” Good readers use metacognitive strategies to think about and have control over their reading. Before reading, they might clarify their purpose for reading and preview the text. During reading, they might monitor their understanding, adjusting their reading speed to fit the difficulty of the text and “fixing” any comprehension problems they have. After reading, they check their understanding of what they read

3. Graphic and semantic organizers

Graphic organizers illustrate concepts and relationships between concepts in a text or using diagrams. Graphic organizers are known by different names, such as maps, webs, graphs, charts, frames, or clusters.

Regardless of the label, graphic organizers can help readers focus on concepts and how they are related to other concepts. Graphic organizers help students read and understand textbooks and picture books.

Graphic organizers can:

1.Help students focus on text structure “differences between fiction and nonfiction” as they read

2.Provide students with tools they can use to examine and show relationships in a text

3.Help students write well-organized summaries of a text

4. Answering questions

Questions can be effective because they:

1.Give students a purpose for reading

2.Focus students’ attention on what they are to learn

3.Help students to think actively as they read

4.Encourage students to monitor their comprehension

5.Help students to review content and relate what they have learned to what they already know

6.5. Generating questions

7.By generating questions, students become aware of whether they can answer the questions and if they understand what they are reading. Students learn to ask themselves questions that require them to combine information from different segments of text. For example, students can be taught to ask main idea questions that relate to important information in a text.

8.6. Recognizing story structure

In story structure instruction, students learn to identify the categories of content (characters, setting, events, problem, resolution). Often, students learn to recognize story structure through the use of story maps. Instruction in story structure improves students’ comprehension.

7. Summarizing

9.Summarizing requires students to determine what is important in what they are reading and to put it into their own words. Instruction in summarizing helps students:

10.Identify or generate main ideas

11.Connect the main or central ideas

12.Eliminate unnecessary information

13.Remember what they read

9:40-10:25 CKLA LL DOMAIN 7 LESSON 1

Domain7 Objectives

Core Content Objectives

Students will:

Identify the sun as a constant source of heat and light energy

Classify the sun as a star

Identify our planet Earth as the third planet from the sun and ideally

suited for life

Demonstrate how day and night on Earth are caused by Earth’s

rotation

Explain why the sun seems to rise in the east and set in the west

Explain what happens during a solar eclipse and lunar eclipse

Explain the reasons for seasons

Describe the characteristics of a planet

Describe stars as hot, distant, and made of gas

Language Arts Objectives

The following language arts objectives are addressed in this lesson.

Objectives aligning with the Common Core State Standards are noted

with the corresponding standard in parentheses. Refer to the Alignment

Chart for additional standards addressed in all lessons in this domain.

Students will:

Sequence four to six sentences describing the events of a solar

eclipse and a lunar eclipse as illustrated and described in “Our Planet

Earth” (RI.3.3)

Interpret information from teacher demonstrations and diagrams in

“Our Planet Earth” about the movements of the earth and moon in

relation to the sun, such as solar and lunar eclipses, daytime and

nighttime, and the seasons (RI.3.7) Make personal connections to concepts related to the students’

position in space presented in “Our Planet Earth” through the creation

of a “space address” for the school (W.3.8)

Make personal connections to concepts presented in “Our Planet

Earth” through engagement with a class KWL chart (W.3.8)

Categorize and organize statements and questions about space

through engagement with the KWL chart used in “Our Planet Earth”

(W.3.8)

Categorize the sun as a star and Earth as a planet (W.3.8)

Make predictions about what would be included in the school’s

“space address” prior to hearing “Our Planet Earth” and then add

the next lines to the “space address” as gleaned from the read-aloud

(SL.3.1a)

Choose words and phrases to describe the motions of the earth

and moon in relation to the sun to effectively explain daytime and

nighttime and the seasons (L.3.3a)

Use the known root astro– as a clue to the meaning of unknown

words, such as astronomy and astronomer (L.3.4c)

Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general

academic, and domain specific words and phrases, including those

that signal spatial relationships, to describe the school’s space

address, such as street, city or town, state, ZIP code, country, and

planet (L.3.6)

Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general

academic, and domain specific words and phrases, including those

that signal spatial relationships, such as orbit, rotate, axis, tilted, and

eclipse (L.3.6)

Introducing the Read-Aloud

Domain Introduction

KWL Chart

Essential Background

Information or Terms

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Our Planet Earth

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Image Cards 2, 3;

globe; small ball; light source

Word Work: Universe

Domain Introduction

Ask students what they see when they look up at the sky during the day.

(Answers may vary, but may include the sun, clouds, occasionally the

moon, etc.) Ask students what they see when they look up at the sky at

night. (Answers may vary, but may include stars, planets, the moon, etc.)

Tell students that when they look up at the sky and past the clouds, they

are really looking into outer space.

Tell students that over the next few weeks they will be learning about

outer space and the study of outer space called astronomy, and that they

will be gathering information that they learn in a Space Notes notebook

or folder.

KWL Chart

On chart paper, a chalkboard, or a whiteboard, create a KWL (What I

Know, Wonder, and Learn) chart. This chart will be used throughout

Lessons 1–6 to determine what your students may already know (K),

what they wonder (W), and what they have learned (L) about our solar

system. Make three columns labeled ‘K,’ ‘W,’ and ‘L.’ Give students the

opportunity to share anything they already know about astronomy and

outer space.

Comprehension Questions

If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent

passages of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. If students

give one-word answers and/or fail to use read-aloud or domain

vocabulary in their responses, acknowledge correct responses by

expanding the students’ responses using richer and more complex

language. Have students answer in complete sentences by having them

restate the question in their responses. It is highly recommended that

students answer at least one question in writing and that some Domain Assessment.

1. [Show Image Card 2 (Sun).] What kind of space object

is our sun? (a star) Why is the sun classified this way? (Our sun is a

huge, distant mass of fiery gas that gives off constant light and heat.)

2. Inferential What kind of space object is Earth? (a planet) Why is Earth

classified this way? (Earth is a sphere in space with a large mass; it

orbits around a star, our sun; it has cleared most other objects from

its path around the sun; it is made mostly of rock and gas; it does not

make its own light.)

3. Describe the ways in which Earth moves in space.

(Earth travels around the sun in an elliptical orbit; Earth rotates or

spins on its axis.)

4. [Show Image Card 3 (Earth).] What characteristics of

Earth did you hear about in this read-aloud that make it a good place

for life? (Earth is the third planet from the sun and gets just the right

amount of heat and light; Earth is just the right temperature; it has an

atmosphere that protects life from harmful sunlight and helps hold

heat to maintain a steady temperature; it has water.)

students share their writing as time allows.

10:30-12.15 MAP TESTING

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

1.00-1.40 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 6 LESSON 1

. Mid-Year Student Performance Task Assessments

In this unit, a Mid-Year Assessment is provided during the first week of

whole group Skills instructional time. There are four main components of

the assessment: a written assessment of silent reading comprehension,

a written assessment of morphology, a written assessment of

grammar, and the oral reading of words in isolation, the last of which is

administered one-on-one with students.

Assessment Mid-Year Assessment Worksheet 1.1 30

Reading Time Whole Group: “Introduction to

Norse Mythology”

Gods, Giants, and Dwarves 25

Spelling Introduce Spelling Words board; Individual Code Chart;

Worksheet 1.1

Take-Home Material Family Letter Worksheet 1.2

Mid-Year Assessment

Worksheet 1.1

During this week, you will be administering the Mid-Year Assessment to

students. This is a valuable time to pause and reflect on the progress that

students have made and plan to address any deficiencies that may be

appearing at this point in the year.

At the end of Lesson 2, you will find a guide that will assist you in

determining the areas of concern and success for each student for silent

reading comprehension and word reading in isolation.

• Ask students to turn to Worksheet 1.1.

• Be forthright with students and tell them that this is a long

assessment.

• Tell them how important it is that they do their very best.

• Discuss with students once again how to take a personal break as

they work.

• Tell students that they will only be working for 30 minutes today and

then they will stop.

• Reassure students that they most likely will not finish today.

• Tell students that tomorrow, they will finish anything that is not finished

today and that they should take their time and check their work.

• Tell students that this assessment consists of three reading

selections. Each reading selection is followed by comprehension

questions.

• Tell students to silently read the first selection and then answer the

comprehension questions. Point out that they may refer back to the

reading selection if needed as they answer the questions. When they

finish the first selection and set of questions, they should start the

second selection and set of questions. When they finish the second

selection, they should start the third selection and set of questions.

Whole Group: “Introduction to Norse Mythology”

.

Introducing the Reader

• Make sure that each student has a copy of the Reader, Gods, Giants,

and Dwarves. Explain that this Reader includes myths from the

ancient Scandinavian countries.

• Tell students that the word Norse comes from the word north; the

warriors who lived in the north were called Vikings. They left the

area where they lived, in what is now northern Europe, and attacked

foreign lands. The Vikings passed down the Norse myths in this

Reader through many generations.

• Remind students that in the earlier unit on ancient Rome, they read

several Roman myths; ask them to name and briefly describe these

myths. (e.g. “Cupid and Psyche” and “Androcles and the Lion”)

• Ask students to describe what myths are. (Myths are fictional tales

that often include gods and goddesses with supernatural powers.

Ancient people often used myths to explain natural events for which

they did not have a scientific explanation. The violence often found in

myths reflects the harsh realities of ancient times.)

• Have students turn to the Table of Contents.

• Either read several chapter titles from the Table of Contents aloud to

students or have students read them.

• Give students a few moments to flip through the Reader and

comment on the images they see.

1:40-:2.00 SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Wednesday , January 25, 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials Measurement REVIEW

•Adding And Subtracting Pounds and Ounces in Compound Units

Objectives: Add or subtract pounds and ounces in compound units

Materials: Appendix 7.3b

Teaching Strategies: Write on board 11 oz + 8 oz=

Ask students how to solve this problem. Tell students that they can add the ounces and then convert to pounds and ounces. Write on the board as shown on the right. Tell students that they can also make a 16 (1pound), taking ounces from one of the numbers of ounces to make 16 with the other number. The remainder is the number in ounces. Tell students that in this example,7 they should take 5 ounces from the 8 ounces to make 16 with the 11 ounces and 8 ounces is 1 pound 3 ounces.

Write on board “3lb 9oz +1lb 14 oz= ____lb____oz

Ask students what strategies they can use to solve this problem here. Tell students that they can add the pounds first, and then add the ounces using strategies already learned.

Have students supply the answer for the task 10(a), Textbook p. 44

Write on board “3lb 5oz-9oz=___lb___oz

Tell students that they can rename one of the pounds as 16 ounces, add that to the 5 ounces giving them 21 ounces and then subtract 9ounces from 21 ounces giving them 12 ounces. Write this on the board.

Tell the students that alternatively, they can rename one of the pounds as 16 oz, subtract 9 oz from it, and add the difference to the remaining pounds and ounces.

Write on board 3lb 9oz-1lb 14oz=___lb___oz Ask students how to solve this problem. Tell students that they can subtract the pounds first, then the ounces, using strategies they have already learned. They can also write these problems vertical,

Have students look at task 13, TB p.45 Aid discussion using the following questions:

-What do they need to find? (Weight of squash)

-What do they know? (Weight of tomato and weight of avocado which is 4 oz more than tomato)

-What else do they know? ( Weight of squash is 2 times that of avocado)

-What model do they use? (Comparison /model)

-How many bars do they draw? (3 bars)

-What is the relative size of each bar?(Tomato is shortest. Avocado is slightly more than 2 times of tomato. Squash is 2 times avocado)

-How do they find the value of the missing part? (Add 3oz and 4 oz together, then multiply by 2)

-What is the answer? (14oz)

Assess: Have students do task 11, 12 and 14, TB p. 45

Practice:WB 6, p. 42-43

Extra Practice: Exercise 3,p. 133-134

Test: Tests 3A and 3B,p. 57-64

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8:50-9:35 MATH REVIEW

9:40-10:25 CKLA LL DOMAIN 7 LESSON 2

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned? Image Cards 2, 3

Essential Background

Information or Terms

Poster 1 (Our Solar System);

yardstick; a lemon-sized

sphere; small marble

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Our Solar System, Part I

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Poster 1; Image Cards 5–7 15

Word Work:

What Have We Already Learned?

Remind students that for the next several days they will be learning about

outer space and astronomy. Ask students if they remember what astro–

means. (stars) Ask students what other words they know that have the

word part astro– and ask if they know what those words mean. (Answers

may vary, but may include astronomer, astrology, astrolabe, etc

Essential Background Information or Terms

Show students Poster 1 (Our Solar System). Tell students that in today’s

read-aloud they will be learning more about the planets in our solar

system. 1. [Show Poster 1.] What is our solar system? (It is the sun

and all of the objects that are in orbit around our sun.) What kinds

of celestial bodies can be found in our solar system? (It includes the

planets, their moons, dwarf planets, asteroids, comets, meteoroids,

and other space debris.)

2. Literal [Show Poster 1 and the mnemonic written on the chart paper,

chalkboard, or whiteboard.] What is the order of all eight planets

from the sun? (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus,

Neptune)

3. [Show Poster 1.] Which four planets form a group

closest to the sun? (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars) What

characteristics do these four planets share? (They all have a core, a

rocky terrain, and are much smaller than the other four planets.)

4. Literal [Show Poster 1.] Describe the asteroid belt and tell where

it is found. (It is a ring of large and small asteroids orbiting the sun

between Mars and Jupiter; it contains the dwarf planet Ceres.)

5. [Show Poster 1.] Which planets are next in sequence

after Mars and the asteroid belt? (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and

Neptune) What characteristics do these four planets share? (They are

very large, have an inner core, are far from the sun, and are called

“gas giants.”)

6. How is a comet like Halley’s comet different from an

asteroid? (An asteroid is made of rocky or metallic material, like a

small planet. Many are found in the asteroid belt. A comet is a lump of

ice, dust, and gas. A comet’s ice melts as it nears the sun.) How are

they similar? (They are both part of our solar system, and they both

orbit the sun. Some are similar in size.)

Show image 2A–9: A meteoroid and a shooting star

7. [Show Image Card 5 (Meteorite Crater).] How are these

three images related? (Meteoroid is the name for a piece of space

debris. If it enters a planet’s atmosphere, it is called a meteor, and

when we can see it burning up, we call it a shooting star. If it hits the

planet, it is called a meteorite, and if it’s big enough, it can create a

crater.)

8. Inferential What is a dwarf planet? (It is a spherical celestial body that

orbits the sun and has not cleared space debris from its orbit.) What

two dwarf planets did you hear about in today’s read-aloud? (Ceres

and Pluto)

9. [Show Image Cards 6 (Ceres and the Asteroid Belt)

and 7 (Pluto).] Compare and contrast Ceres and Pluto and the eight

major planets. (Like some of the planets, Ceres and Pluto are rocky,

spherical, celestial bodies that have a regular orbit around the sun;

they are smaller than all but Mercury and have more debris than the

other planets in the path of their orbits around the sun.)

10. Evaluative What? Pair Share: Asking questions after a read-aloud is

one way to see how much everyone has learned. Think of a question

you can ask your neighbor about the read-aloud that starts with

the word what. For example, you could ask, “What is the difference

between a meteoroid, a meteor, and a meteorite?” Turn to your

neighbor and ask your what question

10:30-12.15 MAP TESTING

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

1.00-1:40 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 6 LESSON 2

Assessment Mid-Year Assessment Worksheets 1.1, E.1, E.2 30

Reading Time Whole Group: “Sif’s Golden

Hair”

Gods, Giants, and Dwarves;

Vocabulary Cards; fiction

chart; Worksheets 2.1, 2.2

Grammar Introduce Conjunction because

board or chart paper;

Worksheet 2.3

Take-Home Material “Sif’s Golden Hair”; Glossar

Mid-Year Assessment

• Tell students that today, they will continue to work on the Mid-Year

Assessment. Pass out Worksheet 1.1 that you collected during the

previous lesson for students who need to finish it.

• Ask them to resume their work at this time. Once again, urge them to

take their time and do their very best.

• For students who have finished, encourage them to check over every

single question before turning the assessment in to you.

• If you have students who have finished the written portion, today you

will begin to administer the Word Reading in Isolation portion of the

Mid-Year Assessment.

• Students who have finished the assessment and are waiting for you

to administer the Word Reading in Isolation Assessment may work

on Worksheets E.1 or E.2. Each of these worksheets is a stand-alone

worksheet and may be used in any order that you feel best suits the

needs of your class.

Note: At the end of this lesson is an analysis sheet for your use as

you check Worksheet 1.1.

Whole Group: “Sif’s Golden Hair”

Introducing the Chapter

• Review the kingdoms and characters in Norse mythology that were

discussed in the previous lesson.

Introduce Conjunction because

• Draw students’ attention to the conjunctions poster.

Conjunctions

Conjunctions are words that connect other words or groups of

words.

• The conjunction and connects words or groups of words. It

means plus, along with, or also.

• The conjunction but is used to connect groups of words. It

signals that “something different,” such as a different idea, will

come after but.

• The conjunction because is used to mean “for this reason” and

signals the answer to a “why” question. It signals the cause of

something.

• Review meanings of the conjunctions and and but.

• Read the third bullet on the poster. (The conjunction because is used

to mean “for this reason” and signals the answer to a “why” question.

It also signals the cause of something.

1:40-2.00 SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Thursday , January 26, 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials MUSIC/PE

P

8:50-9:35 MATH NEW LESSONS/Adding and Subtracting Gallons, Quarts, Pints and Cups in Compound Units…

Objectives: Add or subtract in compound units

Teaching Strategies: Have students discuss task 8 (a), TB p. 60. Aid discussion by asking the following:

-What do they add first?

-What do they add next?

-What other strategies can they use?

-How do they convert from cups to pints? Do they multiply or divide? (Divide by 2)

-What is the final answer?

Write on board 4 gallons 2 qt+ 3 gal 3 qt= ____gal ____qt

Ask students what the steps are to find the answer. Tell students that they can add the gallons first. 4 and 3 is 7, Then they add qt. 2 and 3 is 5. So they have 7 gallons 5 qts. Now, they can convert into gallons and quarts, which is 8 gallons 1 quart. Tell students that they can also get the answer by making a gallon with the 2 qts. Write this on board:

7 gal 2 qt+ 3 qts= 8 gal 1 qt

2 qt 1 qt

You may illustrate with a few more examples. You may use tasks from the following .

-2 ga 3 qt+ 6 gal 2 qt (9 gal 1 qt)

-4 pt 1c +7 pt 1 c (12 pt)

-3 gal 1 qt + 1 gal + 3 qt ( (5 gal)

Have students discuss task 8 (b), TB p. 61. Aid the discussion

-What do you subtract first? ( The pints)

-What do you subtract next? ( The cups)

-What is the answer? ( 1 pt)

Have students do tasks 9 and 10 TBp. 61 Review

Practice Workbook exercise: 5,p.61

9:40-10:25 CKLA DOMAIN 7 LESSON 3

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned?

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Our Solar System, Part II

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Images Cards 3, 7–14 15

Word Work: Frigid

What Have We Already Learned?

Tell students that today they will continue to learn about the planets in

our solar system. Ask students the following questions to review what

they learned in the last read-aloud. You may wish to allow students to

refer to the KWL chart as they answer the questions.

• How many planets are in our solar system? (eight)

• Name the eight planets in order from the sun. (Mercury, Venus, Earth,

Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune) Which planet position is Earth

from the sun? (third)

• What other celestial bodies can be found in our solar system

besides the sun and its planets? (dwarf planets, comets, asteroids,

meteoroids, moons)

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen carefully to find out which planets in our solar

system other than Earth have an atmosphere and how the atmosphere

affects the characteristics of the planet.

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS

1.What is the smallest planet of the eight planets in our

solar system? (Mercury) [Show Image Card 8 (Mercury).] What are

some facts that scientists know about Mercury? (It rotates slowly; its

planetary year is eighty-eight Earth days; its day length is fifty-eight

Earth days; it has a rocky terrain with many craters; it has no real

atmosphere; it is very hot on the side facing the sun and frigid on its

dark side; it is the closest planet to the sun.)

2. How does a planet’s atmosphere act like a

greenhouse? (It traps the heat from the sun and warms the planet.)

Which planets did you hear about in today’s read-aloud that have

atmospheres dense enough to have this “greenhouse effect”? (Venus

and Earth)

3. [Show Image Card 3 (Earth) and Image Card 9 (Venus).]

Compare and contrast the “sister” planets Earth and Venus. How are

they similar? (They are the second and third planets from the sun;

they both have atmospheres that are dense enough to help warm

the planet; they are similar in size.) How are they different? (Venus’

atmosphere is much denser than Earth’s; Venus is much hotter than

Earth; we do not know of living things on Venus.)

4. [Show Image Card 10 (Mars).] What are some facts

scientists know about Mars? (It is covered by reddish, dusty soil; has

a very thin atmosphere; has polar ice caps; is about half the size of

Earth; is the fourth planet from the sun; has two moons or satellites

named Phobos and Deimos.)

5. [Show Image Card 11 (Jupiter).] Describe the planet

Jupiter. (It is a gas giant far from the sun; its atmosphere is very

stormy and constantly moving; it has rings that are hard to see; it has

more than sixty moons; it is the fifth planet from the sun.) What is the

Great Red Spot on Jupiter? (It is a gigantic storm on the surface of

the planet.)

6. Evaluative [Show Image Card 12 (Saturn) and Image Card 14

(Neptune).] Compare and contrast Saturn and Neptune. How are they

similar? (They are both gas giants far from the sun; they both have

rings and moons.) How are they different? (Saturn is much bigger than

Neptune; we have known about Saturn much longer; Saturn’s rings

are more visible; they are the sixth and seventh planets from the sun.)

7. Inferential [Show Image Card 13 (Uranus).] What characteristic makes

Uranus unique in our solar system? (Its axis is tipped far to the side.)

8. [Show Image Card 7 (Pluto).] Why has Pluto been

reclassified as a dwarf planet rather than a planet? (Scientists have

made more discoveries and established new criteria for identifying

a planet. Pluto has not yet cleared its orbit of debris; other celestial

bodies of similar size have been discovered.)

10:30-12.15 MAP TESTING

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

1,00-1:40 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 6 LESSON 3

Assessment Mid-Year Assessment Worksheets 1.1, 3.1, E.1–E.3 30

Reading Time Whole Group: “Loki and the

Dwarves”

Gods, Giants, and Dwarves;

Vocabulary Cards; fiction

chart; Worksheet 3.2

Morphology Introduce Suffixes –ive and –ly

board or chart paper;

Worksheets 3.3–3.6

Take-Home Material “Loki and the Dwarves” Worksheet 3.7

Mid-Year Assessment

Although the majority of students should have completed the Silent

Reading Assessment in the previously allotted 60 minutes, there may

be a few who have not finished. If this is the case, ask them to finish it

today. You may also want to pay particular attention to these students to

find out why it may be taking them longer than their peers. For students

who were absent, please have them complete the assessment during this

time. Whole Group: “Loki and the Dwarves”

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that the title of today’s chapter is “Loki and the

Dwarves.”

• Ask students to turn to the Table of Contents, locate the chapter, and

then turn to the first page of the chapter.

Previewing the Vocabulary

• Following your established procedures, preview the vocabulary as

well as assist students who need help with decoding.

Vocabulary for “Loki and the Dwarves”

1. realm—a kingdom (18)

2. creature—a living thing, specifically an animal (creatures) (18)

3. surly—rude, mean, unfriendly (18)

4. craftsman—a person who is skilled in making things, especially

by hand (craftsmen) (18)

5. flatter—to praise too much in a way that is not sincere or genuine

(flattered, flattery) (18)

6. anvil*—a large, iron block used by blacksmiths on which heated

metal is hit to shape it (anvils) (20)

7. forge—the furnace in a blacksmith shop used for heating metal (20)

8. master—an expert (masters) (22)

9. guardian—a person who watches and/or protects something or

someone (26)

Introduce Suffixes –ive and –ly

Worksheets 3.3–3.6

• Remind students that suffixes are added to the end of a root word.

• Tell students that the two suffixes they will study this week are –ive

and –ly. Students previously learned about adding –ly to words with

the suffix –ous.

• Write the suffixes on the board and point out that the suffix –ive is

pronounced /iv/, even though it is spelled ‘ive’. Students know that –ly

is pronounced /lee/.

Adding Suffix –ive

• Explain to students that –ive means “relating to.”

• Tell students that in this part of the lesson, they will add the suffix –ive

to root words that are verbs. When –ive is added to a verb, the new

word is an adjective.

1:30-1:55 SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up

Friday , January 27, 2017

8:00-8:45 Specials MUSIC/DRAMA

P

8:50-9:35 Math NEW LESSONS/ Practice B/ Lesson 8.2

Objectives: Practice converting between pints, quarts, and gallons.

Practice adding and subtracting pints, quarts and gallons in compound units

Teaching strategies: Have students do Practice B, TB p. 62

Call on some students to explain how they solved the problems. Provide reteaching of concepts that ,may be necessary.

Extra Practice: Exercise 2, p. 143-146

Test: 2A and 2 B,p. 85-90

9:40-10:25 DOMAIN IN CLASS ACTIVITIES

KWL Chart

Using the KWL chart you created in Lesson 1, review briefly with

students what they said they knew about outer space and astronomy.

Ask students if after hearing today’s read-aloud, there is anything they

would like to change in the ‘K’ (Know) column.

Note: If there are any factual inaccuracies in the Know column that

were addressed in today’s read-aloud, prompt students to recognize

and correct them.

Then, remind students of the ‘W’ (Wonder) column to see if they can

find answers to some of their questions from today’s read-aloud. Ask

students if there is anything from today’s read-aloud that they would

like to add to this column. Finally, point to the ‘L’ (Learn) column. Ask

students if there is anything from today’s read-aloud that they would like

to add to this column.

You may wish to have some students create their own KWL charts

and keep them in their Space Notes notebooks or folders.

Planet Research (Instructional Master 2B-1; 3B-1, optional)

Remind students of the planet and dwarf planet research they began

during the last lesson. Allow students to continue their research and to

record the information they gather on Instructional Master 2B-1.

Some students may be ready to use Instructional Master 3B-1 to

record additional information from their research. Students may

also illustrate and/or capture more information about their topic on

the back of the worksheet if they do not have enough room on the

template. Have students keep their worksheets in their Space Notes

notebooks or folders.

10:30-10:55 COMPASS LEARNING

11:00-11:40 CKLA/LL DOMAIN 7 LESSON 4

Introducing the Read-Aloud

What Have We Already Learned? Poster 1 (Our Solar System);

KWL Chart

Space Address

Poster 2 (A Galaxy Like the

Milky Way);

envelope with space address;

dark permanent marker

Essential Background

Information or Terms

Purpose for Listening

Presenting the Read-Aloud Galaxies

Image Card 15;

Discussing the Read-Aloud

Comprehension Questions Poster 2;

Image Card 2

Word Work: Irregular Poster 3 (Galaxy Shapes)

What Have We Already Learned?

Remind students that in the previous lessons, they learned about our

solar system Explain that you will read a statement about the solar system. One word

in the statement will be incorrect. If that one incorrect word is replaced

with the correct word, the statement will be true. Ask students to listen

carefully to each statement and identify the incorrect word. Then ask

a student to repeat the sentence, replacing the correct word for the

incorrect word and making the statement true.

1. There are seven planets in our solar system. (eight)

2. Earth is the fifth planet away from the sun. (third)

3. The four gas giants are Jupiter, Mars, Uranus, and Neptune. (Saturn)

4. The comet belt lies between the planets Mars and Jupiter. (asteroid)

5. Pluto is a dwarf planet and lies in the asteroid belt between Mars and

Jupiter. (Ceres)

6. Moons are natural meteors that orbit a planet. (satellites)

7. It is hot on the side of Mercury facing “away” from the sun. (frigid)

(Alternative correction: It is hot on the side of Mercury facing “toward”

the sun.)

8. The terrain of Venus acts like a greenhouse and traps the heat energy

from the sun. (atmosphere)

Essential Background Information or Terms

It’s hard to imagine a billion stars or how much a billion of anything is.

Here are some ways to think about just how big a billion is.

• A dump truck full of sand contains about a billion grains of sand.

• It would take you almost thirty-two years to count to a billion if you

counted one number each second without stopping.

• A giant cube of ice the length and width of a football field (not

including the end zones) and thirty-five building stories high would

weigh about a billion pounds.

Purpose for Listening

Tell students to listen to learn more about galaxies and to listen to find

1. [Show Image Card 2 (Sun).] What kind of celestial

body is our sun? (a star) Explain why you would classify it that way.

(It is very hot and made of gas—mostly hydrogen and helium gas; it

constantly gives off vast amounts of heat and light.)

2. Compare and contrast our sun with other stars. (Our

sun is a medium-sized, middle-aged, yellow star. Most stars are

bigger, but some are smaller; many stars are hotter, and others not

as hot as the sun; many stars are different colors; our sun is brighter

than some stars and less bright than others; some stars are younger,

and some are older than our sun. Our sun looks bigger and brighter

than other stars because it is so much closer to us than other stars.

Like our sun, most stars are part of a galaxy.)

out why our galaxy is called the Milky Way. 3. Inferential How do the sun and other stars produce constant heat and

light? (The atoms of hydrogen in the star fuse together to form helium;

this fusion releases vast amounts of energy in the form of heat and

light; this is a continuous process.)

4. Literal In the read-aloud today, you learned that even though all stars

look like they are the same distance away, they are not. What do

scientists use to measure the astronomical distances between stars

and other celestial bodies? (the light-year) How far is a light-year?

(One light-year is the distance light travels in one year; nearly six

trillion miles.)

5. [Show Poster 2 (A Galaxy Like the Milky Way).] What is

the Milky Way? (It is the spiral galaxy of which our solar system is a

part.) How did the Milky Way get its name? (The ancient Greeks and

Romans thought that it looked like a milky band in the sky.)

6. What is a galaxy? (A galaxy is a very large collection or

cluster of gas, dust, and stars, separated from other star systems by

lots of space.)

7. There are billions of galaxies in space. What is the name of the

closest spiral galaxy to the Milky Way? (The closest spiral galaxy is

the Andromeda Galaxy.)

8. Describe a spiral shape. What are other examples of

things that have a spiral shape? (Answers may vary, but may include

certain seashells, a spiral staircase, a metal spring, a snail shell, etc.)

9 What words and phrases would you use to describe

the universe? (Answers may vary, but may include words and phrases

like vast, gigantic, astronomical, filled with stars, beyond the galaxy,

etc.) Do you think scientists could measure the entire universe? Why

or why not? (Answers may vary, but may include the idea that the

universe is a vast space that is larger than we can imagine or currently

measure.)

11:45-12:10 RECESS

12:15-12:45 LUNCH

1.00-1.40 CKLA SKILLS UNIT 6 LESSON 4

Assessment Mid-Year Assessment Worksheets 4.1, E.1–E.4 30

Reading Time Whole Group: “Stolen Thunder”

Gods, Giants, and Dwarves;

Vocabulary Cards; fiction

Grammar

Answer Comprehension

Questions Using Conjunction

because

Worksheet 4.3

Take-Home Material

“Stolen Thunder”; Practice

Conjunctions and, but, and

because

Worksheets 4.4, 4.5

Mid-Year Assessment

Worksheets 4.1,

E.1–E.4

• Ask students to turn to Worksheet 4.1.

• Tell students that today, they will take an assessment on all of the

prefixes and suffixes that they have learned so far in third grade.

• Remind them that they should do their very best work and work

quietly so that others may do their best as well.

• When students finish, they may work on additional worksheets

provided.

Whole Group: “Stolen Thunder”

Introducing the Chapter

• Tell students that the title of today’s chapter is “Stolen Thunder.”

Vocabulary for “Stolen Thunder”

1. boomerang—a curved stick that is thrown and then returns to

the person who threw it (28)

2. journey [‘our’ > /er/ (tournament)]—a trip (32)

3. what a pity—that’s too bad (32)

4. mince words—to speak in an indirect and dishonest way (32)

5. villainy—evil behavior (34)

6. beast—scoundrel (36)

7. wisdom—knowledge and good judgment gained over time (36)

Comprehension Questions Using Conjunction

Worksheet 4.3

• Draw students’ attention to the conjunctions poster you prepared for

an earlier lesson.

Conjunctions

Conjunctions are words that connect other words or groups of words.

• The conjunction and connects words or groups of words. It

means plus, along with, or also.

• The conjunction but is used to connect groups of words. It

signals that “something different,” such as a different idea, will

come after but.

• The conjunction because is used to mean “for this reason” and

signals the answer to a “why” question. It signals the cause of

something.

• Remind students that the conjunction because is used to mean “for

this reason” and signals the answer to the question “why.” It also

signals the cause of something.

140-:2.00 SILENT READING

SILENT READING

STUDENTS WILL READ IN CLASS CHAPTER BOOKS SILENTLY INDIVIDUALLY OR IN GROUPS ,CHAPTER REPORTS WILL BE COMPLETED ON EVERY FRIDAY .

2:00-2:55 EOG PREP

Students will be placed into 3 groups according to MAP scores, low, medium and high performing. This week the focus will be reading comprehension, each group will have a short story to read, then summarize, plus answer comprehension questions (READING A TO Z BOOK )

3:00 Dismissal Classroom Clean up